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Stress and Thyroid Disease Atsushi Fukao, Junta Takamatsu, Akira Miyauchi and Toshiaki Hanafusa Fukao, A., Takamatsu, J., Miyauchi, A. & Hanafusa, T. (). Stress and Thyroid Disease. Endocrine Diseases. ISBN: 978-1-922227-78-2. iConcept Press. Retrieved from http://www.iconceptpress.com/books/047-1-1/endocrine-diseases/

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This chapter reviwed the role of psychosocial factors including personality traits as well as stresses on the onset and clinical course of Graves' disease including our reports. Because there are some studies about the relationships between stress and other thyroid diseases including Hashimoto' s thyroiditis, Plummer' disease and benign thyroid nodule, we also introduced these reports.
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Objective. —This article defines stress and related concepts and reviews their historical development. The notion of a stress system as the effector of the stress syndrome is suggested, and its physiologic and pathophysiologic manifestations are described. A new perspective on human disease states associated with dysregulation of the stress system is provided.
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