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Abstract

People respond to the hazards they perceive. If their perceptions are faulty, efforts at public and environmental protection are likely to be misdirected. In order to improve hazard management, a risk assessment industry has developed over the last decade which combines the efforts of physical, biological, and social scientists in an attempt to identify hazards and measure the frequency and magnitude of their consequences.**
... Illusion of control has been chosen as one of the cognitive biases under study in the current project. This choice was made based on the ability of this bias to be measured on a self-report scale, as well as the finding that controllability has been identified in past literature as an important facet of risk perception (e.g., Benthin et al., 1993a;Hampson et al., 2001a;Slovic et al., 1979). ...
... The results supported a relationship between positive thought-action fusion and some forms of risk-taking behaviour, but there were no significant relations between this cognitive bias and risk perception. A limitation of this study was that risk perception was measured based only on how risky the participants believed the activities to be, using a five-point rating scale that ranged from "not at all risky" to "extremely risky"; however, past research (e.g., Sargeant et al., 2010;Slovic et al., 1979;Weinstein, 1982) has shown that personal and contextual factors are also involved in risk perception. ...
... The concept of risk inherently has two components: possible benefits and possible consequences. Whether or not an individual chooses to engage in the risky activity is a decision that is largely based on personal and situational factors (e.g., Sargeant et al., 2010;Slovic et al, 1979;Weinstein, 1982), which may be conceived as facets of risk perception. A measure of risk perception that incorporated these risk-perception facets would provide a more holistic assessment of risk perception. ...
Thesis
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Development and psychometric evaluation of a holistic measure of risk perception
... Receiving formal education in an area has been considered as a form of conceptual expertise (Kahneman, 2011), as higher education appears to involve an understanding of intricate relationships among factors and context-sensitive application of such knowledge (Kahneman, 2011;Kahneman & Klein, 2009;Shafto & Coley, 2003). Indeed, results in the literature show that graduates and professionals in a given field can be distinguished based on specific aspects of their expertise (Asamizuya et al., 2022;Kahneman, 2011;Savadori et al., 2004;Slovic et al., 1979;Smith et al., 2013). For example, there are differentiations in the thinking patterns of biology and non-biology college majors (Smith et al., 2013), as well as in the cognitive strategies and solutions employed by experienced fishermen as compared to novices (Shafto & Coley, 2003) or legal experts versus lay persons (Asamizuya et al., 2022). ...
... Las evaluaciones de riesgo de los expertos se basan en proyecciones metodológicas, muchas veces numéricas y técnicas: número de muertes, lesiones y daños a las propiedades (Slovic, Fischhoff y Lichtenstein, 1979). Por el contrario, las percepciones del público tienden a considerar mayores los riesgos cuando los peligros son relativamente menos familiares y evocan más emociones negativas debido a su potencial catastrófico (Slovic, 1987). ...
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