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Salvaging national pride: The 2010 taekwondo controversy and Taiwan's quest for global recognition

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Abstract

In this article, we analyze Taiwan's grassroots reactions to the disqualification of taekwondo icon Yang Shu-chun in the 2010 Guangzhou Asian Games, in order to examine how a technical dispute induced political and popular campaigns that variously blamed the governing party, the People's Republic of China, and South Korea for inflicting shame on both the athlete and on Taiwan. Our research combines a historiography of Taiwan's post-WWII experience, analysis of the nature of the Internet, and an assay of Taiwan's three major newspapers. We find that the Yang incident became a symbolic vehicle for expressing the feeling of the nation's citizens that Taiwan is trapped in international politics, and for restoring their national pride by transforming Yang into a virtuous heroine. We propose an attention to local, contingent narratives on sports, through which even regional games or failures serve to reinforce national identity.

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This paper discusses some principles of critical discourse analysis, such as the explicit sociopolitical stance of discourse analysts, and a focus on dominance relations by elite groups and institutions as they are being enacted, legitimated or otherwise reproduced by text and talk. One of the crucial elements of this analysis of the relations between power and discourse is the patterns of access to (public) discourse for different social groups. Theoretically it is shown that in order to be able to relate power and discourse in an explicit way, we need the `cognitive interface' of models, knowledge, attitudes and ideologies and other social representations of the social mind, which also relate the individual and the social, and the micro- and the macro-levels of social structure. Finally, the argument is illustrated with an analysis of parliamentary debates about ethnic affairs.
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Indonesia's achievement and engagement as the host of the fourth Asian Games in Jakarta was not only a big leap towards adopting the knowledge and skills of modern sport management and reaching international athletic standards, but also a triumph of nationalism. Through the games the Indonesian people established their national identity and rebuilt their self-esteem. Let by President Soekarno, the games were used as a symbol to break Western hegemony and to establish a ‘new order’ in the world.
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Thailand has played a unique role in the history of the Asian Games. It was the host country for the Asian Games in 1966, 1970, 1978 and 1998. It saved the Asian Games when they were in crisis. This contribution will analyse how the crisis happened and how Thailand coped with it and saved the games three times within 12 years; and how Asian countries have used sport for national identity and co-operation within the Asian world.
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The internet and its surrounding technologies hold the promise of reviving the public sphere; however, several aspects of these new technologies simultaneously curtail and augment that potential. First, the data storage and retrieval capabilities of internet-based technologies infuse political discussion with information otherwise unavailable. At the same time, information access inequalities and new media literacy compromise the representativeness of the virtual sphere. Second, internet-based technologies enable discussion between people on far sides of the globe, but also frequently fragmentize political discourse. Third, given the patterns of global capitalism, it is possible that internet-based technologies will adapt themselves to the current political culture, rather than create a new one. The internet and related technologies have created a new public space for politically oriented conversation; whether this public space transcends to a public sphere is not up to the technology itself.
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To what extent do online discussion spaces expose participants to political talk and to cross-cutting political views in particular? Drawing on a representative national sample of over 1000 Americans reporting participation in chat rooms or message boards, we examine the types of online discussion spaces that create opportunities for cross-cutting political exchanges. Our findings suggest that the potential for deliberation occurs primarily in online groups where politics comes up only incidentally, but is not the central purpose of the discussion space. We discuss the implications of our findings for the contributions of the Internet to cross-cutting political discourse.ResumenLos Grupos Online y el Discurso Político: ¿Facilitan los Espacios de Discusión online la Exposición a los Desacuerdos Políticos?¿Hasta qué punto los espacios de discusión online exponen a los participantes a hablar de política y sobre sus visiones en temas relevantes de política? Recurriendo a una muestra nacional representativa de más de 1000 Estadounidenses que reportaron haber participado en salones de conversación ó foros de mensajes, examinamos los tipos de espacios de discusión online que crearon oportunidades para intercambios de temas relevantes de política. Nuestros resultados sugieren que el potencial para la deliberación ocurre primariamente en los grupos online donde los temas políticos aparecen solo en forma incidental, pero no es el propósito central del espacio de discusión. Discutimos las implicancias de nuestros hallazgos para las contribuciones del Internet sobre los temas del discurso político relevante.ZhaiYaoYo yak
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A revised set of International Health Regulations came into force in June 2007. A month earlier, The Lancet had noted the importance of filling the remaining gaps in the global health system. One of these gaps was the exclusion of Taiwan from the structures of the World Health Organization (WHO), denied a presence at the World Health Assembly and able to communicate with the WHO only through a complex and time-consuming bureaucratic process. This situation was becoming increasingly indefensible in the face of clear difficulties in transmitting information about epidemic diseases, such as the SARS outbreak in 2003 and the growing threat of avian influenza since 2004. This is at last being addressed following a landmark decision to admit Taiwan to observer status at the World Health Assembly in May 2009. These developments will be addressed in this article.
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Bairner A (2005) Sport and the nation in global era. In: Allison L (ed.) The Global Politics of Sport: The Role of Global Institutions in Sport. London; New York: Routledge, pp. 87-100.
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