Article

Skin Lightening and Wrinkle Improving Efficacy of Organic Portulaca oleracea Extract in Skin Care Cosmetic

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Abstract

To find the new raw material having skin care activity, P. oleracea of organic native plant was extracted and concentrated with solvent extracting method. As a cosmetic active material, it is to develop an active raw molecule for discovering new skin pathway such as anti-aging, whitening and wrinkle skin improvement. The skin irritating evaluations (in-vitro) were performed to confirm the skin safety of its extract. Both free radical scavenging activity and collagen biosynthesis activity for skin anti-aging activity were evaluated with control sample (pure ascorbic acid). Melanin inhibition activity (in-vitro) as a skin lightning effect, to find the skin whitening was tested to use its material. As an application study, two high functional emulsion lotion having almost natural sources containing P. oleracea extract were formulated without any preservatives and totally evaluated the skin improvement effect (whitening, anti-aging activity and fine wrinkle diminish effect, human volunteer test, in-vivo). Therefore, the organic P. oleracea extract can contribute to the development of new natural active ingredients for advanced skin care cosmetic.

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... D. edulis oils have been projected as possible substitute for P. Americana oil in cosmeceutical formulations [26] . Apart from traditionally documented applications, some modern trials have also established the utility of plant extracts in personal care products [27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34] . Herbal cosmetics, referred to as products, are formulated using various permissible cosmetic ingredients to form the base in which one or more herbal ingredients are used to provide defined cosmetic benefits 35 . ...
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Modern skincare products are formulated using plant extracts as active ingredients. Leaf and stem of Talinum triangulare and leaf and bark of Dacryodes edulis extracts were used for the development of cosmetic formulations for in vivo evaluation of their moisturizing effects. Absence of redness, itching, or blemishes on the forearms of volunteers, with the cream without the extracts (control) and with creams containing the extracts (actives), confirmed the safety of these formulations. The pH of the active creams and control (4.9-5.4) were within the pH of the skin. There were no coalescence of dispersed phase, phase separation and change in colours of the active creams and the control from their respective initial colours stored at 7 °C, 30 °C and 40 °C for 90 days. Creams prepared with ethanol extracts of T. triangulare leaf hydrated the skin more than the other plant materials, indicating its potentials as moisturising ingredient to treat dry skin.
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... The other constituents of the plant include glutathione (Lalromawii Devi et al. 2014), terpenoids, alkaloids (Chowdhary et al. 2013), phenolic compounds (flavonoids in particular) (El-Aziz et al. 2014), and volatile oils (Chowdhary et al. 2013). Furthermore, purslane shoots contain high levels of vitamins A, C, B1, B2, B3, B6, B9 (Azuka et al. 2014), and E (Kim et al. 2013), and minerals (Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, K, Zn) (Azuka et al. 2014). This medicinal herb has bactericidal, antidiabetic, diuretic, antiinflammatory, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-arthritic (Chowdhary et al. 2013) and anticancer effects (El-Aziz et al. 2014). ...
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Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) contains a variety of natural products with different biological properties. The objective of this research was to estimate changes in total phenolics, flavonoids, and fatty acids (α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid) contents as well as antioxidant activity of P. oleracea at different growth stages. Seeds were germinated in soil-filled plastic pots at greenhouse. Leaves and stems were collected at the vegetative and flowering stages. Total phenol and flavonoid contents of the samples were determined by Folin–Ciocalteau and aluminum chloride methods, respectively. The contents of α-linolenic and linoleic acids were determined using gas chromatography analysis after transesterification of fatty acids. Furthermore, Ferric reducing antioxidant power and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assays were used to determine the antioxidant activities. The highest contents of total phenols (698.6 mg GAE 100 g−1 DW), flavonoids (46.9 mg QE 100 g−1 DW), α-linolenic acid (2.7 mg g−1 DW) and linoleic acid (0.8 mg g−1 DW) were determined in the leaves at flowering stage. Free radical scavenging capacity was significantly affected (P ≤ 0.05) by age; and the leaves of purslane had more antioxidant potential compared to stems. A positive correlation was observed between the antioxidant activities and total phenols content. Overall, purslane leaves at flowering stage can be regarded as a valuable source of fatty acids (especially α-linolenic acid) and antioxidants in human diet.
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The phytochemical analysis of the fresh aerial parts of Portulaca oleracea (Portulacaceae), growing in Jordan, using conventional chromatographic procedures resulted in the isolation of Beta-sitosterol, Beta-sitosterol-glucoside, N,N'-dicyclohexylurea, and allantoin. The last three compounds were isolated for the first time from this plant. The structure elucidation of these compounds was attained by the use of spectral data (UV, IR, MS, 1H-, 13C- and 2D-NMR), X-ray crystallography and by comparison with authentic samples.
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Multiple forms of tyrosinase, T1, T2, T3, have been shown to differ with respect to carbohydrate moieties of these isozymes. We demonstrated that, in cultured B-16 melanoma cells, melanization can be completely interrupted by glycosylation inhibitors, such as glucosamine and tunicamycin, and that these inhibitors cause a selective loss of membrane-bound T3. It is further found that inhibition of melanization induced by glucosamine occurs even in the presence of protease inhibitors, such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and leupeptin, and that melanization inhibition is reversible upon removal of the inhibitor. In this report we have also examined the process of development and recovery of the tyrosinase isozymes in cells in which the interruption of melanogenesis has been released by the removal of these glycosylation inhibitors. The recovery process, which occurs during the period after interrupted melanogenesis and is a process of remelanization, has been biochemically followed. Tyrosinases obtained from the deoxycholate-solubilized large-granule fraction of these melanoma cells have been analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immediately after removal (0 h recovery) of the glycosylation inhibitor, loss of melanization and T3 is accompanied by T1 heterogeneity which is visualized as two electrophoretically distinct species, T1' and T1''. At this time, T1' and T1'' do not have a concanavalin A affinitive carbohydrate moiety but do possess in vitro dopa reactivity. When recovery of melanization begins visibly 24 h later, T3 is re-formed with disappearance of T1 heterogeneity. By 48 h, the previous normal level of melanization is almost attained. These results suggest that maturation of tyrosinase may occur via T1' and T1'' as precursors of T3, or possibly T1 through the addition of N-glycosydically linked oligosaccharide moieties which can be interrupted by glucosamine and tunicamycin.
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