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Effect of Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) Leaf Extract on Serum and Liver Lipid Levels of Rats Fed a High Fat Diet

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Abstract

Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaf is known to be effective for 'overcoming body heat' and stopping bleeding. It is commonly used as a traditional curing plant for the treatment of hematemesis, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematuria, and metrorrhagia in traditional Chinese medicine. This study investigated on the effect of oral administration of lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaf extract on the serum and liver lipid levels of rats fed a high fat diet. Experimental rats were divided into five different experimental groups, including the general diet group (Cont), high fat diet with lotus leaf extract groups (HL40, HL80, HL120), and high fat diet group (HFG). Body weight significantly decreased in the HL120 sample compared to that of Cont. The weights of the livers and kidneys of rats corresponded to the increase in body weight. Total cholesterol and triglyceride contents in liver tissues of rats were lowest in the sample HL120 sample. The levels of total lipids, total cholesterol, and triglycerides in serum were lower in the HL120 sample compared to the HFG.

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... The results show that dietary AELL can decrease serum TAG, cholesterol, and LDL levels and increase the serum HDL level of grass carp. Similar hypolipidemic effects of dietary lotus leaf extract addition are reported in hamsters and rats (Du et al., 2010;Lee and Lee, 2011;Guo et al., 2013;Lee et al., 2015). Thus, dietary lotus leaf extract can improve the blood lipid profiles of animals for better health. ...
... Apart from the hypolipidemic effect, dietary supplementation of lotus leaf extract is reported to decrease hepatic TAG in rats and hamsters (Du et al., 2010;Lee and Lee, 2011;Guo et al., 2013). Our study is in agreement with these results. ...
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... Similar to the results of the present study, the animal study by Cha and Cho [32] reported that potato extract added by 0.5% level of the meal caused no changes in body weight during 2 weeks. The study by Lee and Lee [33] reported that there was a decreased trend of body weight gain in the lotus leaf extract intake group compared to the high fat diet group. In other words, potato and lotus leaf extract intake might have caused a decreased trend of body weight gain in participants of this present study without controlling the dietary habit and daily activity. ...
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