Article

The Challenge of Internationalizing FCS Faculty Activity

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Abstract

This study explores the challenges family and consumer sciences (FCS) faculty face as they internationalize their teaching, research, and service. Challenges to internationalized activity as perceived by FCS faculty include institutional, resource, and personal barriers. Although institutional and resource barriers are considered more challenging by FCS faculty, analysis shows that personal barriers such as lack of personal engagement with international issues are most related to decreased international activity.(Contains 5 tables.)

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... A number of studies address the external and/or institutional variables that often influence the ability to internationalize a college or university (Hustvedt & Dickson 2011;NAFSA, 2012;O'Connor, 2009;Olson & Kroeger, 2001;Ray & Solem, 2009). Most of these studies cover the four-year university environment. ...
... Intrinsic/Internal variables such as competencies, capacity, background, experience, attitudes, personality, and values/beliefs may all influence faculty engagement in this topic (Heely, 2005;Hustvedt & Dickson, 2011;NAFSA, 2012;O'Connor, 2009;Olson & Kroeger, 2001). Extrinsic/External variables, such as the Five I's (intentionality, investment, infrastructure, institutional networks, and individual support) also play an important role in engaging the faculty toward internationalizing their practice (Childress, 2010). ...
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