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EXTERNAL MORPHOLOGY OF THE EGGS OF SOME IAPPET MOTHS (LEPIDOPTERA, LASIOCAMPIDAE)

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External Morphology of the Eggs of Some Lappet Moths (Lepidoptera, Lasiocampidae). Dolinskaya I. V. • Pljushch I. G. -'Eggs of 9 species belonging to 5 genera of Lasiocampidae were examined with the use of scanning electron microscopy. Descriptions and comparative morphological analysis are provided for all these species. As a resuh,'all the examined species arc divided into 2 groups and 2 subgroups; the diagnostic characters for genera and species are chosen. HapYJKuaJl Mop4>OJlOnIJl Jlllll nCKOTopblX KOKOltonpJUlOB (Lepidol)tcra, Lasiocampidae). .uOJlIIHCKaJl M. B., nJUow M. f. -C nOMOIllbK> 3J1CKTpoHHOro cKaH~lpYK>UlerO MUKpocKona H3Y~leHbl Jlj.{ua 9 BH.llOB Lasiocampidae. OTHOCflllU1eCSI K 5 pOllaf>1. BblJJCnCHbl .oWlrHOCTI1'ICCKl1e npH3HaKI1 DJIfI pOJJOS 11 I3H.o08. npo-BellCHa OUCHKa 3Ha'1l1MOCTH npH3HaK013. Ha OCH013<lHIIH CpaI3HHTellbHO-MOp(~OllOrH'leCKOro aHMH3a Bce I1cCllcnyeMblc lH1l1bJ pa311eJleHbi Hn 2 rpynnbl 11 2 no.arpynnbL K1110 'I e Bbl e en 0 13 a: Lcpidoptem. Lasiocampidae. flHua, Mopcl>ollOrI1H, cKYllbnTypa 3K30XOp110Ha, onl1ca-HIHI, llJ.1<lrHOCTWleCKHC npH3H<lKI1.
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... Egg:~2.2 mm by 1.6 mm. A detailed description of the egg with SEM images can be seen in Dolinskaya and Pljushch (2000). Clusters of 20-30 eggs are laid on needles towards the top of a host tree (Kobayashi and Taketani, 1994). ...
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The EFSA Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of Dendrolimus superans Butler (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), the larch caterpillar, for the EU territory. D. superans is a major pest of conifer forests in Japan, northeast China and non-European Russia. However, reports of damage are to conifer species not grown in EU forestry. Larix gmelinii and Pinus pumila are regarded as major hosts. Eggs are laid on host needles and developing larvae feed on host foliage. Larvae overwinter in the soil. In its native range, D. superans usually takes one or two years to develop. In principle, host plants for planting and plant products, such as cut branches and wood with bark, could provide pathways into the EU. However, prohibitions on the import of Abies, Cedrus, Larix, Picea, Pinus and Tsuga from areas where D. superans occurs closes such pathways. Nevertheless, a derogation for specific dwarfed Pinus plants from Japan exists. Climates similar to those in some of its existing range occur in the EU. Norway spruce (Picea abies) is a known host in Japan although reports of any impact are lacking. Experiments on the related species D. sibiricus indicated that larvae were able to develop on forestry conifer species occurring in the EU, but which are found outside the native range of D. sibiricus. Were D. superans to be introduced into the EU, impacts on P. abies are possible and it is conceivable that D. superans could expand its host range, as seems possible with D. sibiricus. However, this remains uncertain. Other hosts are grown in the EU as ornamentals or amenity trees. D. superans satisfies all the criteria that are within the remit of EFSA to assess for it to be regarded as a potential Union quarantine pest. Some uncertainty exists over the magnitude of potential environmental and economic impacts.
... Cellular sculpture is typical for many Bombycoidea, Lasiocampidae, Notodontidae and Erebidae (Lymantriinae, Arctiinae, Hermeniinae). The cells in these groups are located chaotically on the surface of eggs, and not grouped in regular columns (Dolinskaya, 1987 a, b, c;Dolinskaya, 1990Dolinskaya, , 2014bDolinskaya, Pljushch, 1999, 2000Pljushch, Dolinskaya, 2000 a, b;2001). ...
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A comparative morphological analysis is provided for 70 species belonging to 59 genera of 13 subfamilies of Noctuidae from Ukraine. Diagnostic characters of the eggs for some species are identified. A comparison with representatives from other families of Noctuoidea is conducted. Some characters typical for separate species and general characters typical for most species are discussed.
... comm.). Most studies of lepidopteran eggs focus on the external morphology of the chorion (Hinton 1981;Dolinskaya and Pljushch 2000), but the morphology of the chorion has only been described in a few species in Tineidae (Arbogast et al. 1980(Arbogast et al. , 1989Robinson and Nielsen 1993). Eggs of Tineidae are generally "flat" (with the micropylar axis horizontal) and ovoid or subcylindrical in actual shape. ...
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On the basis of comparative-morphological analysis of 43 genera and 92 species of Palaearctic Notodontidae, as well as the study of the eggs of outgroup species, complexes of characters that are diagnostic, taxonomic or phylogenetic are singled out. It is shown that the egg characteristics are of great taxonomic value at species and generic levels. Some characters are useful for grouping genera. In general, a complex of characters should be used, because different species or genera often share the same characters. Possible apomorphic and plesiomorphic states of the different characters are discussed in relation to the different taxa. The results of this study are discussed with reference to recently published classifications of Notodontidae. As a result of the studies, the keys for identification to the eggs of 43 genera and 92 species of notodontid moths from the Palaearctic region are presented. Reliable diagnostic characters that do not disappear with the injury of eggs or with eggs preserved in alcohol were used. Characters including egg shape, egg and chorion colour, the shape of gnawed holes in eggs when caterpillars hatched, chorionic sculpture, the type of oviposition, foodplants, and geographic distribution of the genera and species were applied. Occasionally, characters that are typical for live eggs, which vary during development, were used. These are characters of egg colour and pattern. The keys are illustrated with photographs made using a digital camera and a scanning electron microscope.
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Presented, with comments, are 131 plates of illustrations of geometrid eggs representing five subfamilies of the Geometridae: one species of Oenochrominae, 72 species of Ennominae, four species of Geometrinae, nine species of Sterrhinae, and 45 species of Larentiinae. The illustrations are useful as identification aids, in demonstrating relationships between species, and in assessing the validity of species groupings based on taxonomic criteria from other life stages.
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Presented, with notes, are 124 plates of SEM illustrations of noctuid eggs representing 14 subfamilies of the Noctuidae: one species of Agaristinae, four species of Pantheinae, six species of Acronictinae, 34 species of Noctuinae, 26 species of Hadeninae, 10 species of Cuculliinae, 14 species of Amphipyrinae, three species of Acontiinae, two species of Euteliinae, two species of Plusiinae, 11 species of Catocalinae, one species of Hypeninae, one species of Rivulinae, and nine species of Herminiinae.
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Morphological features of the eggs of Euxoa campestris, E. declarata, and E. rockburnei, the “declarata group”, were diagnostic for the species; the esterase zymograms of the eggs of campestris and declarata support the morphological findings. Chorionic features and the esterase zymograms of a hybrid resembled those of the female parent.
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The eggs of several species of cutworms of the subgenera Chorizagrotis, Crassivesica, Longivesica, Orosagrotis, and Pleonectopoda in the genus Euxoa Hübner are described. Within the genus eggs are of two main types, those with smooth chorions and those with ridged chorions, but all have the same basic chorionic design. Variations in the degree of ridging and in the detail of the design make the egg useful for species determination, and a key to some species is provided. However, the egg is of little value in distinguishing the subgenera as they are currently constituted.
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The eggs of 18 species of cutworms of the subgenus Euxoa Hübner are described and a key for separating some of them has been constructed. Only in rare instances can species be identified from egg morphology alone, but the egg stage can usually be identified to the subgeneric level.
The eggshells of 3 moths, Cydia pomonella (Tortricidae), Heliothis virescens, and Spodoptera littoralis (Noctuidae) were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. The surface of the noctuid eggs shows structural elements (micropylar rosette, ribs, cross-ribs, and aeropyles) and regional differentiation, all typical of Lepidoptera. The egg of C. pomonella shows a different regional morphology due to its watch-glass shape and its position, lying on the flank. The micropylar structures are on the lower egg face in contact with the substrate. For S. littoralis, the surface structure (sculpturing) of the egg is not species-specific, being indistinguishable from that of S. frugiperda (Salkeld, 1984).In all 3 moths, the eggshell fine structure is basically identical, as revealed by TEM. Both the vitelline envelope and the chorion consist of several distinct layers. The vitelline envelope, bi-layered and several μm thick, undergoes a marked structural change when embryogenesis begins. At the same time, Golgi vesicles bearing dense particles, appear in the periplasm of the egg cell in fertilized eggs of H. virescens and S. littoralis. The chorion of all 3 species consists of a basal layer (C-1), a cavity layer (C-2) supported by trabecles and opening to the exterior via aeropylar canals, and a lamellar layer (C-3), which probably consists of helicoidally arranged stacks of fibrils. In H. virescens and S. littoralis, an additional epicuticle-like layer (C-4) is present. Available data from the literature are summarized and a basic scheme of the radial eggshell fine structure of ditrysian Lepidoptera is proposed.
Morphology of the egg of Notodontid moths (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae) of the fauna of the USSR. Comm. 2. II Vestnik zoologii. -1987 b. -NQ 2. -P. 50-60)
  • I V Dolinskaya
Dolinskaya I. V Morphology of the egg of Notodontid moths (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae) of the fauna of the USSR. Comm. 2. II Vestnik zoologii. -1987 b. -NQ 2. -P. 50-60). -[J1.0JlUHCKafl f1. B. BHewHHH MOP<pOJtOnlH 5II1U xoXJtaTOK (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae) <PaYHbI CCCP. Co06meHI1e 2. II BecTH. 300JtO- nll1. -19876. -NQ 2. -C. 50-60).