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Evaluation of Key Team Integration Indicators for New Product Success by Using a Two-step Methodology

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Abstract

Project team integration relates directly to the New Product Development (NPD) success. However, in new product management practice, there are too many team integration indicators to distinguish the importance of them. To solve the problem, this paper investigates the key integration indicators of project team, according to the influence of integration indicators on NPD success. Firstly, we constructed the evaluation model of integration indicator. Then, a two-step Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP) and Support Vector Regression (SVR) methodology was used to analyze the weights of NPD success factors and the optimal integration indicators. An F-test was also applied to identify the importance sequence of key integration indicators. The findings show that collective sense, information sharing, commitment from top management and leadership are the key indicators for NPD success. Finally, implications for research and practice are discussed.

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