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Neurofeedback and Epilepsy

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Abstract

This chapter introduces the published research on neurofeedback and epilepsy, followed by a description of the clinical protocols typically used and illustrated with case examples when appropriate. Then, the use of qEEG (electroencephalography) to improve outcome is described. The research on neurofeedback and epilepsy has historically been limited (of necessity) to small sample sizes and only a single group for which pre- and post-treatment effects are determined. One exception was a study using SCP, which was a controlled study with between-group comparisons. Despite these limitations, results have been consistent across studies, generally suggesting that neurofeedback leads to reduction in seizures. The chapter argues that the studies utilizing SCP training, though not as numerous, also show positive outcomes.
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Article
Epilepsy is the fourth most common neurological disorder worldwide despite many anti-seizure medications. Biofeedback (BFB) and neurofeedback (NFB) have shown significant promise since the 1960s to improve seizure control, abnormalities in electroencephalography (EEG) and quantitative-EEG, and quality of life. Epilepsy is a disease of brain networks and BFB/NFB is a non-invasive, brain-centered, low-risk, low-cost, and reliable treatment for people with seizures/epilepsy and especially since standard seizure medications and epilepsy surgery often do not result in complete seizure control. Neuroscience healthcare clinician experience and a 60-year literature foundation show that BFB/NFB to improve brain dysregulation and abnormal network dynamics are known to be at the root of seizures/epilepsy. BFB/NFB trains individuals to self-regulate brain activity through real-time performance feedback. An exhaustive literature review for NFB/BFB and seizures/epilepsy (1960s–present) yielded 150 articles documenting improvements in seizures and EEG/QEEG abnormalities. Clinicians, insurers, and the public should support BFB/NFB as a first-line intervention for seizures/epilepsy.
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This is a case report of an adult female patient with ADHD, temporal seizure disorder, and Borderline Personality Disorder treated with 30 weekly sessions of SMR neurofeedback and carbamazepine. Posttreatment measures showed improvements in T.O.V.A., self report, and QEEG. Both neurofeedback and carbamazepine showed the most effect in early treatment. Progress continued after discontinuance of the drug.
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Article
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Article
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