Conference Paper

Design and Evaluation of an Exploration Assistant for Human Deep Space Risk Mitigation

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Abstract

This paper describes the development of a Virtual Camera (VC) system to improve astronaut and mission operations situation awareness while exploring other planetary bodies. It is claimed that the advanced interaction media capability of the VC can improve situation awareness as the distribution of human space exploration roles change in deep space exploration. It can minimize the risk of astronauts exploring unknown reaches of the solar system with limited previous knowledge of the area under exploration. It can be thought of as a tour guide with captured expertise to aid exploration. It provides a collaborative tool so that ground-based expert knowledge can be captured and be easily assessable in the remote deep space environment. A tablet PC-based interactive database application has been developed and tested for usability and capability to improve situation awareness. The method of testing will be described as well as testing results.

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... Astronauts and ground personnel never stop switching from one to the other. In this section of the article, I will use the virtual camera concept, initially developed in the context of the NASA Lunar Electric Rover 25 (LER) for the exploration of the Moon (Boy et al. 2010;Platt 2013;Platt et al. 2013;Platt & Boy 2014), describing its salient parts that enable presentation of generic HCD principles. Aerospace and more generally complex life-critical system domains involve expert and experienced human operators, which is not the case in public domains such as telephony and office automation. ...
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Multi Level Cooperation in Air-Traffic Control
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