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Effects of Yogasanas in the Management of Pain during Menstruation

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Menstrual irregularities are main problems in females due to many reasons. The aim of the study is to evaluate effects of yogasanas in the management of pain during menstruation.100 patients were selected as subjects, among them 50 participants in the case group were asked to attend 45 minutes yoga class every day with medications for a period of 3 months. The control group 50 subjects did not receive any yoga intervention only medications and were asked to complete questionnaires. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to measure the pain severity for both the groups. The results of this study showed that yoga and relaxative techniques are better and beneficial therapy in the management of irregular menstruation and reducing the pain during menstruation. These techniques may be used as supportive along with conventional medications.
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Effects of Yogasanas in the Management of Pain during Menstruation
Authors
Vungarala Satyanand1, Kaliki Hymavathi2, Elakkiya.Panneerselvam3
Shaik Mahaboobvali4, Shaik Ahammad Basha5, Chemuru Shoba6
1Professor, Department of philosophy of Nature Cure and Yoga, Narayana Yoga and Naturopathy Medical
College and Hospital, Nellore
2Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Narayana Medical College and Hospital, Nellore
3Lecturer, Department of Yoga, Narayana Yoga Naturopathy Medical College and Hospital, Nellore
4Scientist, advanced Research center, Narayana Medical College, Nellore
5Statistician, Narayana Medical College, Nellore
6BNYS Student, Narayana Yoga Naturopathy Medical College and Hospital, Nellore
Correspondence Author
Dr. Vungarala Satyanand
Professor & Head
Department of philosophy of Nature Cure and Yoga, Narayana Yoga Naturopathy Medical College and
Hospital, Chinthareddypalem, Nellore-524003 Andhra Pradesh. India.
Email: drsatyanand@gmail.com
ABSTRACT
Menstrual irregularities are main problems in females due to many reasons. The aim of the study is to
evaluate effects of yogasanas in the management of pain during menstruation.100 patients were selected as
subjects, among them 50 participants in the case group were asked to attend 45 minutes yoga class every day
with medications for a period of 3 months. The control group 50 subjects did not receive any yoga intervention
only medications and were asked to complete questionnaires. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to measure
the pain severity for both the groups. The results of this study showed that yoga and relaxative techniques are
better and beneficial therapy in the management of irregular menstruation and reducing the pain during
menstruation. These techniques may be used as supportive along with conventional medications.
Key words: Yogasanas, pain during menstruation.
INTRODUCTION
A menstrual disorder is a physical or emotional
problem that interferes with the normal menstrual
cycle, causing pain, unusually heavy, light
bleeding, delayed menarche, and missed periods1.
Menstrual disorder is one of the most common
problems in the women of the reproductive age
group. Generally, women’s are having menstrual
irregularities like excess or scanty flow etc2.
Women have high rates of menstrual irregularities
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33%, Amenorrhea 9%, psychological factors,
stress, depression, lack of concentration were
found to be associated with menstrual
irregularities3. A menstrual disorder is a physical
and psychological problem that interferes with the
normal menstrual cycle. Irregular menstruation is
common gynaecological disorder among female
adolescents4.
The symptoms of irregular periods are may vary
depending on the woman, her hormonal patterns
and menstrual history. It may causing painful
cramping, involves menstrual periods that are
accompanied by usually in the pelvis and lower
abdomen(Dysmenorrhea), Infrequent menstrual
periods (oligomennorrhoea), too frequent periods
(Polymenorrhoea), missed periods (Amenorrhea),
abnormal duration of bleeding(Menorrhea),blood
clots, changes in blood flow unusually heavy or
light bleeding5. Patient with irregular menstrual
cycles, obesity, infertility, all likely to impact
quality of life, mood, potentially precipitate
depression and anxiety. Indeed, it has a significant
effect on adult women, resulting in diminished
quality of life, dysfunction in the family and work
environment6.
In a study by Lisa J Moran7, psychological stress,
anxiety, depression, fatigue, vomiting, lack of
attention, Sleeplessness, life style changes, diet
modification and without daily exercises are the
causes for increasing weight, that leading to
irregular periods. If one month the cycle 23 days
and another it's 35 days, and then another it's 30
days, this type of changes observe in the
menstrual cycle called as irregular periods7. Yogic
techniques offer a means to reduce the
physiological and psychological problems8. Yoga
has its origin in ancient India. Its original form
consisted of spiritual, moral, and physical
practices. The different relaxation techniques
often lead to specific psychological and
physiological changes termed as relaxation
response9. Yogic life style is a form of holistic
mind-body medicine, developed thousands of
years ago, is simple and can be practiced by all.
There is mounting evidence that yoga reduces the
pain and menstrual disorders10. Yoga reduces the
psychological conditions like stress, tension,
depression and anxiety, and also reduces the
physiological problems like pain during
menstruation and irregular periods11.Yogic
relaxation training should be prescribed more
frequently as an adjunct or alternative to
conventional drug therapy for menstrual pain and
disorders12.
The present study was planned to assess the effect
of Yogasanas in the management of pain during
menstruation in adolescent group with unknown
causes.
METHODOLOGY
This randomized study with 100 subjects
conducted at Narayana medical college and
hospital, Narayana Yoga and Naturopathy
Medical College and Hospital, Nellore, Andhra
Pradesh, India. The study protocol approved by
the Institutional Ethical Committee. Informed
consent was obtained from study participants. The
subjects were familiar with the aims and
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objectives of the study. The study will be
conducted up to 3 months (90 days) of periods.
YOGA INTERVENTION
The following yoga poses were done by the study
groups are practicing 45 minutes daily. Sukshama
vyayama 12 minutes, Padmasana 2 minutes,
Paschimottasana 2 minutes, Vajrasana 2 minutes,
Ushtrasana 2 minutes, Shashankasana 2 minutes,
Matsyasana 2 minutes, Uttanpadasana 2 minutes,
Sarvangasana 2 minutes, Surya namaskara 12
rounds 10 minutes. After practicing these asana
Shavasana were given up to 7 minutes as follows.
S.No
Asana Names
Duration
1.
Sukshama Vyayama
12 minutes
2.
Padmasana
2 minutes
3.
Paschimottasana
2 minutes
4.
Vajrasana
2 minutes
5.
Ushtrasana
2 minutes
6.
Shasangasana
2 minutes
7.
Matsyasana
2 minutes
8.
Uttan Padasana
2 minutes
9.
Sarvangasana
2 minutes
10.
Surya Namaskara
10 minutes
11.
Shavasana
7 minutes
EXCLUSION CLITERIA:
Women’s were having any gynaecological related
surgeries, pregnancy, Pelvic inflammatory
diseases , Thyroid problems, Poly Cystic Ovarian
Disease, Hereditary problems and uncooperative
subject were excluded.
STUDY PROTOCOL
In this study protocol the total participants are
100. Among them 50 participants in the study
group were asked to attend 45 minutes yoga class
every day for a period of 3 months. All classes
were free of charge to the participants. The control
group 50 subjects did not receive any yoga
intervention only medications and were asked to
complete questionnaires. Each group was
evaluated after 3 months. Visual analog scale
(VAS) was administered on both the groups at the
end of 3 months.
SAFETY EVALUATION
Any adverse events will be recorded at during the
study period. Breakfast will be provided at the end
of study. At the period of menstruation unable to
perform the yoga during these days subjects will
not practiced.
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ASSESSMENT
The collected data’s were statistically analyzed by
the student’s t test. p value less than 0.05 shown to
be significant.
RESULTS
The present interventional study shows that 50
adolescent’s girls with mean±S.D age of 21.50
±3.164 were selected as cases those underwent
yoga session with medicines. 50 girls of age
matched (mean±S.D. 20.50 ±1.930) were selected
as control group underwent only medication.
During the first visit, case group girl’s shows
mean VAS score 4.16 versus 4.22 with p-value
0.679. During second visit, case group girl’s
shows mean VAS score 2.38 versus 2.8 with p
value 0.007. Whereas at final visit, VAS score of
cases recorded 0.26 versus control 1.38 with p
value less than 0.001. The cases who done yoga
shown a very high significant change of VAS
score completing the last visit i.e. at third visit.
This current study proved that practice of regular
yoga in the given manner that is Sukshama
vyayama 12 minutes, Padmasana 2 minutes,
Paschimottasana 2 minutes, Vajrasana 2 minutes,
Ushtrasana 2 minutes, Shashankasana 2 minutes,
Matsyasana 2 minutes, Uttanpadasana 2 minutes,
Sarvangasana 2 minutes, Surya namaskara 12
rounds 10 minutes. After practicing these asanas
Shavasana were given up to 7 minutes.
Figure 1. Shows VAS scale of both groups at
first, second and third visit
DISCUSSION
In this present study results showed that yoga
provided a beneficial result in the treatment of
irregular menstruation and relieving the pain
during menstruation. Yoga is a reparative
techniques with breathing for improving the
health, control, prevention and curing of diseases.
It promotes the physical relaxation by decreasing
the activity of sympathetic nervous system and
increased parasympathetic function13. yogasana
and relaxation techniques helps in the reduction of
irregular menstruation problems like pain stress,
anxiety, depression, lack of concentration ,tension
and irritation14.
The results suggest that there was a very high
significant improvement in positive well being,
improves the vitality in the case group. Yogasana
is believed to balance the body and mind. Yoga is
an ancient technique for improving the health.
Practice of yoga has increased in several countries
for various ailments, particularly related to
physiological and psychological problems15. Yoga
is believed to balance psychic and vital energies
within the psychic channels of the energy
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framework underlying the physical body. Free
flow of these energies is considered to be the basis
of optimal physical and mental health16.
Yoga promotes the physical relaxation by
decreasing the activity of sympathetic nervous
system, which lowers the heart rate and increase
the breathe volume. A deep breathing provides
extra oxygen to the blood and causes the body to
release endorphins, which are naturally occurring
hormones that reenergize and promote
relaxation17. The effect of pain is mainly
deposited in the lower abdomen muscles; muscle
relaxation attained through stretching of
abdominal muscles was the main aim in practicing
of asana for reduction of pain. Yogasana and
relaxation techniques help in the reduction of
irregular menstruation and pain during periods.
Previous studies have also shown that employing
yoga interventions are good effective treatments
of psychological and physiological well beings18.
However, the improvement in control group did
not show a significant difference, but in the case
group there was improvement in these parameters
also when compared to control groups. The
subjects who practiced yoga they felt that they
have experienced and learnt a skill in the form of
yogasanas, Pranayama, loosening exercises .They
felt very happy and self confident, fully satisfied
with the treatments.
CONCLUSION
Current study with medicines and yoga gives
better management to reduce pain during
menstrual cycle. The study showed that yoga
techniques can be used as supportive therapy
along with conventional medications to reduce
pain during menstruation.
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