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Indentifying Metaphor and Analogy Strategies for The Creative Design using Protocol Analysis

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Abstract

The aim of this research is to explore the potential of analogy and metaphor as design strategies for supporting the creative design thinking. For the empirical research on analogical and metaphoric process in designing, we conducted design experiments that consist of three different conditions of given items as stimulation for design inspiration: baseline, surrealist paintings, and housing design collections. The results were analyzed using a protocol analysis in order to obtain more systmatic interpretation of the design processes and strategies. As a result, it was noted that students are more apt to read visual information rather than semantic information in the given items. Instead of the representation of their senses or feelings from the paintings, they visualized the analogical images of the paintings for the design representation. However, analogical and metaphoric thinking derived from the given items seem change a designer's perspective, thus bring a novel interpretation on design problems, and eventually more creative and meaningful design ideas. An extended research using one-semester training and observation of the design studio process is introduced as a follow-up study for this paper. This research will investigate the long-term effect of the analogy and metaphor on the design thinking.
22 1호 통권96 _ 2013.02
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22 196호 _ 2013.02
22 1호 통권96 _ 2013.02
22 196호 _ 2013.02
22 1호 통권96 _ 2013.02
22 196호 _ 2013.02
22 1호 통권96 _ 2013.02
22 196호 _ 2013.02
22 1호 통권96 _ 2013.02
22 196호 _ 2013.02
22 1호 통권96 _ 2013.02
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