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Comparing the effectiveness of nasal dilator strips: Does race play a role?

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Abstract

Background: Nasal dilator strips are thought to widen and stiffen the anterior nasal cavity, and thus improve symptoms of nasal obstruction. It is postulated that anthropomorphic differences in external nasal proportions between races may influence the effectiveness of such dilator strips. Methods: Caucasian and Asian subjects were compared. Nasal peak inspiratory flow, nasal airway resistance, minimum cross-sectional area and visual analogue scale measurements of nasal obstruction were recorded at baseline and following the application of two different dilator strips. Results: Nine Caucasian and six Asian subjects were recruited (n = 15). There was a significant difference between races in terms of nasal peak inspiratory flow improvements following nasal strip application (mean of 29.4 litres per minute in Caucasians vs 14.6 litres per minute in Asians; p = 0.04). Only Caucasians experienced a significant decrease in nasal airway resistance (median of 0.12 Pa/cm3/s; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Nasal peak inspiratory flow, minimum cross-sectional area and visual analogue scale values improved from baseline with strip application in both populations. Only Caucasians experienced significant nasal airway resistance improvement with strip application. Both cohorts experienced nasal peak inspiratory flow improvement, with Caucasians experiencing a significantly larger improvement.

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... In addition to classical surgical procedures for the improvement of nasal breathing, further therapeutic options exist, particularly for the treatment of too narrow nasal valves, including minimally invasive procedures on the one hand and widening nasal strips on the other hand [89], [90], [91], [92]. However, for both therapeutic options, there are very few scientific publications. ...
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We examined whether the use of two different external nasal dilator devices influenced the size of the nasal valve area and symptoms of nasal congestion. This was a randomized blind-allocation, open three-way crossover study of Breathe Right, Side Strip Nasal Dilators, and placebo. We studied 12 healthy subjects (10 female, 2 male; age range 26-56 years). Measures of total volume and total minimum cross-sectional area were collected. Subjective symptoms were collected using a visual analog scale and an ordinal scale. With both products, there was significant increase in the size of the minimum cross-sectional area compared to placebo, p = 0.004. This is supported by the decrease in the subjective reports of congestion; on the visual analog scale, compared to placebo p = 0.012 and the ordinal scale, compared to placebo, p = 0.004. Both devices significantly increase the size of the nasal valve area and reduce congestion in normal subjects.
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