Sociodemographic and psychosocial factors associated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

ArticleinPediatric Diabetes 11(5):337-44 · September 2009with7 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.57 · DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-5448.2009.00593.x · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    To examine the role of sociodemographic factors and psychosocial adjustment in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) use among adolescents with type 1 diabetes.
    A total of 150 adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their caregivers completed measures of general psychological functioning, diabetes functioning, and stressful life events. Blood glucose monitoring (BGM) frequency and glycemic control were also assessed. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between CSII use and sociodemograpic and psychosocial factors.
    All logistic regression models were significant, indicating a large proportion of the variance in CSII use was associated with sociodemographic, diabetes-specific and psychosocial variables. Final models showed higher frequency of BGM and having private insurance as significant correlates of CSII use. CSII use was also associated with adolescent and caregiver reports of sharing of responsibilities around diabetes management and negative affect regarding BGM.
    Adolescents currently prescribed CSII therapy evidenced key differences from their counterparts using multiple daily injections (MDI) in insurance status, diabetes management behavior, and family functioning related to diabetes. Efforts to understand the role of family factors in the maintenance of CSII therapy with clinical indicators of CSII use may inform treatment effectiveness.