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An International Research and Applications Project (IRAP) Caribbean Workshop Report: Integrating Climate Information and Decision Processes for Regional Climate Resilience

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Abstract

The International Research and Application Project (IRAP) hosted a two-day workshop that followed the Caribbean Climate Outlook Forum (CariCOF). The workshop contributed to and advanced discussions about the application and impacts of seasonal climate information. It also focused on developing partnerships for future projects that help develop regional capacity to prepare for and respond to climate risks. Interviews, focus groups, and group discussions during the workshop and preceding CariCOF explored the interrelation between the physical climate and social contexts, producing a wealth of information from which future efforts can draw.
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