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ICOGRADA Design Education Manifesto 2011

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ICOGRADA Design Education Manifesto 2011

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The Icograda Design Education Manifesto, a key legacy of Oullim, is a core document that defines the Council's position on design education. The Manifesto advocates that design education must be a learning-centred environment, enabling students to develop their potential in and beyond academic programs. The Icograda Design Education Manifesto was developed in 2000 as collaboration by an international group of designers. Participants represented a geographically, politically, economically, culturally, and socially diverse cross section of the design education community. Prof. Ahn Sang-Soo (South Korea) led the project which was translated into seventeen languages and presented at the Icograda Millennium Congress Oullim 2000 Seoul. 2011 Manifesto Update The 2009-2011 Icograda Executive Board resolved to mark the 10 anniversary with an update of the Manifesto. This update was intended to help steer design curriculum and equip faculty and students to handle current and future issues in design education. Its form and content addressed the participatory, social nature of academic exchange in today's online community, shaped by technological advances.
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... Esto es porque la información más relevante proviene de los usuarios, de su contexto y su cultura. La mejor manera de entender la cultura del otro, de acuerdo con los antropólogos, es estar con él, hombro con hombro (Press y Cooper, 2007;Triggs, 2011;Dubberly, 2011). Esta interacción debe ir más allá e incluir al usuario no sólo participando y proporcionando información, sino también dándole forma a la solución y al diseño y llevando esta interacción hacia una conversación cuya "interacción se centre en comprensión, acuerdo y acción" (Glesne, 2006, p. 77 ...
Article
Full-text available
A través de la investigación-acción se identificaron cinco áreas que las comunidades de educadores del diseño necesitan desarrollar para responder a los contextos contemporáneos: revisión del contenido curricular, innovación en la pedagogía, comprensión de la sociedad y del cliente en un contexto sostenible, visualización de un futuro sostenible y el desarrollo de una comunidad internacional multidisciplinar de escuelas. Through action-research, five concepts were identified that design schools need to develop in order to respond to contemporary contexts: revision of curricular content, innovation in in pedagogy, understanding of society and the client in a sustainable context, visualization of a future sustainable development and the development of a multidisciplinary international community of schools.
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Conference Paper
In recent years, there has been a turn to design practices with the promise of more human-centred outcomes. However, the value of this shift remains understudied in social change settings such as D/development. This thesis explores the distinct value of design for D/development from the standpoints of the actors closely intertwined in its projects. The discussion is grounded in understanding little-d development as ‘human flourishing’ based on the self-determined life that one would like to live. Whereas big-D Development is conceptualised as the Eurocentric post-WWII system to transition Global South countries into modernist, capitalist economies. Following a period of ‘prolonged crisis’ relating to its top-down power, outside-in knowledge flows, rigid working cultures, and questionable impact – some scholars consider Development as a ‘grand design gone sour’. Actors operating within this system are facing a challenge of reinvention. Given this backdrop, there is growing adoption of design practices in the search for, and transition toward alternatives. The discussion regarding the value of design in this thesis is grounded in understanding the act of ‘designing’ as an ontological, collaborative and social process of cultural exploration. Such acts of designing are deeply in-tune with the struggles and aspirations of human experience; and can drive the transformation of things, beings and Being. Yet, there remains limited empirical evidence regarding how encountering design is of value to actors involved in complex social change processes. Drawing on an ethnography of projects in Ghana and Kenya, as well as interviews with citizens/users, implementers, funders and designers; I argue that acts of designing can build trust, integrate knowledge, sustain ownership, enhance relevance, affirm agency, reduce risks, reorient accountability, strengthen capability, and challenge power dynamics. This makes the value of design relevant in the search for, and transition toward alternatives. However, this contribution is contingent on the navigation of a variety of ethical dilemmas. As such, this thesis elucidates how design is encountered, what kind of value it offers actors, and what is required for this value to be realised in social change settings such as Development projects.
Thesis
Recent reports published in Hong Kong highlight the lack of experienced and competent designers in the city (Heskett, 2003; The DesignSmart Research Project, 2008). Two possible reasons behind this problem are insufficient training provided to fresh university graduates upon their transition into the workplace and the fact that academics and employers do not realize they have a role to play in the transition. University-workplace transitions have been studied extensively around the world (Schein, 1972; Argyris & SchÖn, 1989; Eraut , 1994, 2007; Boshuizen, 2003; Tuomi-Grohn, Engestrom & Young, 2003; Smeby, 2007; Asian Development Bank, 2012), with researchers pointing out that there is often a ‘learning gap’ between the two settings. Little, if any, research in this area, however, has focused on how university students become “professional designers” through the transition, and few, if any, studies have focused on the context of Hong Kong. Meanwhile, research shows that this period is critical to graduates’ learning through professional practice and their acquisition of different types of knowledge and skills (Boshuizen, 2003; Guile & Young, 2003; Eraut, 2007). Given the significance of this transition and the dearth of studies focusing on design graduates, my PhD study examined the questions of what general issues graphic design graduates typically face during the transition and how these issues affect their professional development. Three kinds of respondents or stakeholders were involved in the study: graduate graphic designers, design firm employers and design academics. The study relied on a mixed method approach, with the qualitative interview method as the core qualitative component and a survey as the supplementary quantitative component. Pattern-matching and category construction were used for analyzing the qualitative data, while descriptive statistics were used to validate and support the conclusions arrived at through the analysis of the qualitative data. The findings of the study confirm that Hong Kong graphic design graduates entering the profession lack the practical competence expected of them and needed for successful socialization into the professional community. This was highlighted by all the three groups of respondents who felt that university education does not prepare design graduates for professional practice. Several explanations for this problem were identified. It was suggested that this problem is mainly due to the fact that the criteria by which competence is judged are different between academia and professional practice. It was also found that neither academics nor firm employers consider themselves as having the primary responsibility for providing training to graduates during the transition. All the three groups of stakeholders concurred to a significant extent that an arduous workplace environment, a lack of structure and accountability of the stakeholders, and the absence of a professional ‘goal’ in graphic design, all contribute to the difficulty in graduates’ professional development. The results of the study suggest that all the stakeholders must take greater responsibility for raising the professional standards of graduates. This seems to demand that in the first place, some agreement must be reached between the stakeholders about the core competences of graphic design and the types of training needed in the transition. Once that has been done, it may be possible for the academic curriculum and the requirements of professional design bodies to be better harmonized. It seems obvious from the evidence presented here that closer collaboration between academia and professional bodies is vital. In the longer term, given the absence of sufficient research into what constitutes “graphic design”, what is needed is further research into the “core competences” and comprehensive “professional criteria ” of graphic design in Hong Kong, defined in terms of skills, practices, and knowledge.
Article
Full-text available
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Article
Full-text available
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This paper describes aspects of a course in visual communication at Sunderland Polytechnic in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The paper includes an article first published in 1970 plus commentary to set it in context.
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This paper was originally given as a keynote presentation to the IIID Vision Plus 12 Conference held in Schwarzenberg, Vorarlberg, Austria in 2007. Presentations are not papers and in some respects they do not translate one into the other. I have edited it for this Journal as a stand-alone piece; at least that is my hope.
Lessons From Paulo Freire
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Giroux, H.A. October 17, 2010. Lessons From Paulo Freire. The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/article/Lessons-From-Paulo-Freire/124910/
How Do You Transform Good Research Into Great Innovations? Fast Company
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Kolko, J. 2011. How Do You Transform Good Research Into Great Innovations? Fast Company, http://www.fastcodesign.com/1663002/howdo-you-transform-good-research-into-greatinnovations, January 9. [accessed 24 February 2011]
Improving information management in the insurance industry
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Fisher, P and Sless, D. 1990. Improving information management in the insurance industry. Information Design Journal, 6(2):103-29.