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A molecular phylogeny for the pyraloid moths (Lepidoptera: Pyraloidea)

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We present the first detailed molecular estimate of relationships across the subfamilies of Pyraloidea, and assess its concordance with previous morphology-based hypotheses. Maximum likelihood analyses yield trees that differ little among data sets and character treatments and are strongly supported at all levels of divergence. Subfamily relationships within Pyralidae, all very strongly supported, differ only slightly from a previous morphological analysis, and can be summarized as Galleriinae + Chrysauginae (Phycitinae (Pyralinae + Epipaschiinae)). In Crambidae the molecular phylogeny is also strongly supported, but conflicts with most previous hypotheses. Among the newly-proposed groupings is a wet-habitat clade comprising Acentropinae + Schoenobiinae + Midilinae, and a provisional mustard oil clade containing Glaphyriinae, Evergestinae and Noordinae.
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... There are six DNA barcoding sequences published in BOLD systems including two species, O. caliginosa and O. eurata and one unidentified species (Ratnasingham & Hebert 2007). Moreover, Regier et al. (2012) uploaded 14 linear coding sequences of different proteins of Ogygioses sp., the same as the unidentified species in BOLD systems to GenBank (https://www.ncbi. nlm.nih.gov/). ...
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