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THE EVALUATION OF THE PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES AND THE FACTOR STRUCTURE OF THE SLOVAK VERSION OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE TMMS (TRAIT META-MOOD SCALE)

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Abstract: The aim of the present study was to adapt the English self-report questionnaire Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS) to Slovak conditions, as well as to evaluate its psychometric properties and to investigate its 3-factor structure reported by the authors. TMMS is used to measure the trait meta-mood experience that represents several dimensions of perceived emotional intelligence (i.e. attention to one´s own emotions, their clarity and repair). After having done a back-translation in cooperation with the authors of TMMS, we evaluated its reliability and construct validity within the sample of 282 university female students and via the instruments used to measure mindfulness, trait anxiety, alexithymia and difficulties in emotion regulation. Finally we conducted the exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of its items. It has been shown, that TMMS represents a reliable and valid instrument. However the results of EFA indicated that there might be more than three factors in the structure of the Slovak version of TMMS. Key words: Trait Meta-Mood Scale, meta-mood experience, construct validity, reliability, exploratory factor analysis
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... The French version of the TMMS shows, through confirmatory factor analysis, a 3-factor structure with 30 items, as well as a demonstrated concurrent validity with other instruments, in a young adult population (Maria et al., 2016). In Turkey, the test was adapted in university students, applying factor analysis and varimax rotation, determining 4 factors for this version (Aksöz et al., 2010); while in the Slovak Republic, it was adapted in a group of female university students, evidencing adequate properties for three factors, adding that the existence of more factors could be evaluated (Látalová & Pilárik, 2014). The TMMS was also translated into Italian, evidencing adequate concurrent validity in adults and verifying the cross-cultural adaptability of the instrument (Giromini et al., 2017). ...
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