Article

The effects of age at cochlear implantation and hearing aid trial on auditory performance of Chinese infants

Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (Ministry of Education), Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing 100005, China.
Acta oto-laryngologica (Impact Factor: 1.1). 09/2009; 130(2):263-70. DOI: 10.3109/00016480903150528
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Most of the infants demonstrated rapid improvement in the three different auditory skills within the first year after switch-on. Infants undergoing hearing aid trial and habilitation demonstrated a significant positive effect on the development of auditory skills in comparison with infants without trial and habilitation.
This paper aims to evaluate the auditory performance of infants of different age at cochlear implantation, emphasize the importance of the hearing aid trial and habilitation before implant, and provide baseline data of auditory development.
In all, 259 infants with prelingually profound hearing loss participated in this study. The Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS) was used to assess auditory skills in infants at different intervals.
The mean scores for the auditory skills improved significantly over time. The mean scores of three skills for each group at each interval were significantly different. The mean scores of the auditory skills were significantly superior for infants undergoing hearing aid trial and habilitation in comparison with those of infants without hearing aid trial and habilitation.

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    • "However, the children in Zheng et al.'s (2011) study were exposed to Chinese dialects to varying degrees, and it is necessary to document speech perception development in children who are exposed to Mandarin only since dialects may affect speech perception development (Zheng et al., 2011). Furthermore, while Zheng et al. (2011) examined outcomes in children who had tried hearing aids prior to cochlear implantation, as many as 40% of implantees in mainland China may have not trialed hearing aids (Chen et al., 2010). Thus, research was still needed to examine whether a hearing aid trial (HAT) would make a difference in outcomes, and whether it should be required before CI. "
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the development of early auditory capability and speech perception in the prelingual deaf children after cochlear implantation, and to study the feasibility of currently available Chinese assessment instruments for the evaluation of early auditory skill and speech perception in hearing-impaired children. A total of 83 children with severe-to-profound prelingual hearing impairment participated in this study. Participants were divided into four groups according to the age for surgery: A (1-2 years), B (2-3 years), C (3-4 years) and D (4-5 years). The auditory skill and speech perception ability of CI children were evaluated by trained audiologists using the infant-toddler/meaningful auditory integration scale (IT-MAIS/MAIS) questionnaire, the Mandarin Early Speech Perception (MESP) test and the Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility (MPSI) test. The questionnaires were used in face to face interviews with the parents or guardians. Each child was assessed before the operation and 3 months, 6 months, 12 months after switch-on. After cochlear implantation, early postoperative auditory development and speech perception gradually improved. All MAIS/IT-MAIS scores showed a similar increasing trend with the rehabilitation duration (F=5.743, P=0.007). Preoperative and post operative MAIS/IT-MAIS scores of children in age group C (3-4 years) was higher than that of other groups. Children who had longer hearing aid experience before operation demonstrated higher MAIS/IT-MAIS scores than those with little or no hearing aid experience (F=4.947, P=0.000). The MESP test showed that, children were not able to perceive speech as well as detecting speech signals. However as the duration of CI use increased, speech perception ability also improved substantially. However, only about 40% of the subjects could be evaluated using the most difficult subtest on the MPSI in quiet at 12 months after switch-on. As MCR decreased, the proportion of children who could be tested using the MPSI reduced. Within one year after CI, children develop early auditory and speech perception capabilities with time. Chinese versions of the IT-MAIS/MAIS, MESP and MPSI are useful instruments to document early auditory and speech perception skills in children after CI implantation.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Zhonghua er bi yan hou tou jing wai ke za zhi = Chinese journal of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery
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    • "To date, most Chinese pediatric CI studies have evaluated speech understanding in terms of language awareness [21], lexical tone production and perception [22] [23], Cantonese word recognition [24], as well as closed-set Mandarin early speech perception [25]. Because of general difficulties associated with testing children (e.g., limited language development, subject attention, etc.), very few studies have evaluated Chinese CI users' open-set word or sentence recognition with multiple talkers. "
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    ABSTRACT: Because of difficulties associated with pediatric speech testing, most pediatric cochlear implant (CI) speech studies necessarily involve basic and simple perceptual tasks. There are relatively few studies regarding Mandarin-speaking pediatric CI users’ perception of more difficult speech materials (e.g., words and sentences produced by multiple talkers). Difficult speech materials and tests necessarily require older pediatric CI users, who may have different etiologies of hearing loss, duration of deafness, CI experience. The present study investigated how pediatric CI patient demographics influence speech recognition performance with relatively difficult test materials and methods.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2011 · International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
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    • "To date, most Chinese pediatric CI studies have evaluated speech understanding in terms of language awareness [21], lexical tone production and perception [22] [23], Cantonese word recognition [24], as well as closed-set Mandarin early speech perception [25]. Because of general difficulties associated with testing children (e.g., limited language development, subject attention, etc.), very few studies have evaluated Chinese CI users' open-set word or sentence recognition with multiple talkers. "

    Full-text · Article · May 2011 · International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
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