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LSH for similarity search in generic metric space

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Abstract

This is the presentation talk covering my master degree research results, presented at the kick-off event of Scalable Similarity Search project at ITU-Copenhagen (the project is coordinated by Prof. Rasmus Pagh) http://sss.projects.itu.dk/kickoff.html The complete thesis is here https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267394989_Metric_space_indexing_for_nearest_neighbor_search_in_multimedia_context

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