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Eviota atriventris, a New Goby Previously Misidentified as Eviota pellucida Larson (Teleostei: Gobiidae)

Abstract

A species commonly identified as Eviota pellucida in the literature has been misidentified and is in fact an undescribed species, described here as E. atriventris. Eviota pellucida is known only from the Gilbert and Marshall Islands, Ponape, Mariana Islands, and the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Eviota atriventris is known from the Ryukyu Islands, Philippine Islands, Palau Islands, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Eviota atriventris differs from E. pellucida in both preserved and live coloration and in pectoral-fin ray counts.
Accepted by M.T. Craig: 23 Dec. 2011; published: 17 Feb. 2012
ZOOTAXA
ISSN 1175-5326 (print edition)
ISSN 1175-5334 (online edition)
Copyright © 2012 · Magnolia Press
Zootaxa 3197: 5562 (2012)
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55
Eviota atriventris, a New Goby Previously Misidentified as Eviota pellucida
Larson (Teleostei: Gobiidae)
DAVID W. GREENFIELD¹ & TOSHIYUKI SUZUKI²
Research Associate, Department of Ichthyology, California Academy of Sciences, 55 Music Concourse Dr., Golden Gate Park, San
Francisco, California 94118-4599 and Emeritus Professor, University of Hawaii. Mailing address: 944 Egan Ave., Pacific Grove, CA
93950, USA; Email: greenfie@hawaii.edu
²Kawanishi-midoridai Senior High School, 1-8 Kouyoudai, Kawanishi, Hyogo 666-0115, Japan;
Email: trimma-toshiyuki@hop.ocn.ne.jp
Abstract
A species commonly identified as Eviota pellucida in the literature has been misidentified and is in fact an undescribed
species, described here as E. atriventris. Eviota pellucida is known only from the Gilbert and Marshall Islands, Ponape,
Mariana Islands, and the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Eviota atriventris is known from the Ryukyu Islands, Philippine Islands,
Palau Islands, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.
Eviota atriventris differs from E. pellucida in both preserved and live coloration and in pectoral-fin ray counts.
Key words: Teleostei, Gobiidae, Eviota, new species, S.W. Pacific
Introduction
Eviota pellucida was described by Helen Larson in 1976 from the Mariana and Gilbert Islands. The description
was accompanied by a drawing, but no color photograph; however, a description of life color was included. In
1997 Randall published what he thought to be the first life color photograph of E. pellucida, a 20 mm TL fish from
Flores, Indonesia (Fig. 1). This fish had a distinctive black abdomen with a curved white stripe running through the
black area from the pectoral fin to the anal-fin base. Since that time others have published similar photographs
identified as E. pellucida (Myers 1999; Laboute and Grandperrin, 2000; Ikeda et al., 2003; Senou, et al. 2004; Ran-
dall 2005).
The second author photographed and captured a species of Eviota in Japan (=Eviota sp. 4 sensu Senou et al.,
2004) that he did not recognize and thought it might be undescribed (Figs. 2–4). In examining the specimen we
found that it had the distinctive dark coloration on the snout and top of the head similar to specimens of E. pellu-
cida. In reexamining the original description of E. pellucida (Larson, 1976), we realized that her drawing and
description of the live color matched the specimen from Japan, but not the photographs in the literature purported
to be E. pellucida (Fig. 5). This widespread species with the dark abdomen and a light colored stripe is described
as new in this paper.
Materials and Methods
Counts and measurements, descriptions of fin morphology and the cephalic sensory-canal pore patterns follow
Lachner and Karnella (1980). Measurements were made to the nearest 0.1 mm using dial calipers and an ocular
micrometer, and are presented as percentage of Standard Length (SL). All specimen lengths are SL. Cyanine Blue
5R (acid blue 113) stain was used to make pores more obvious (Akihito et al. 1993; Saruwatari et al. 1997; Nakabo
2002). Values for the holotype are given first, followed by the range for all types, and by the mean, where appro-
priate, in parentheses.
GREENFIELD & SUZUKI
56 · Zootaxa 3197 © 2012 Magnolia Press
Eviota atriventris n. sp.
Blackbelly Dwarfgoby (English name), Shiroobi isohase (Japanese name) (Figs. 1, 6–8)
Eviota pellucida (non Larson). Randall, 1997:6, fig. 7; Myers 1999: 254, Pl. 160B; Laboute & Grandperrin, 2000: 409, fig.;
Ikeda et al., 2003: 57, figs. 105–106; Senou, et al., 2004: 137, fig.; Randall, 2005: 533, fig.
Holotype: ROM 76339, 17.1 mm male, Palau, due west of Koror where lagoon rises to outer barrier reef,
07º20’44.3” N, 134º16’47.2” E, 0–7.9 m, patch reef of numerous Porites bommies, rotenone, field number RW04-
12, R. Winterbottom, W. Holleman, B. Hubley, and D. Winterbottom, 24 May 2004.
FIGURE 1. Underwater photograph of Eviota atriventris, Flores. Photograph by J.E. Randall.
FIGURE 2. Eviota pellucida, OMNH 35616, Ishigaki-jima Island, Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Photograph by T. Suzuki.
Zootaxa 3197 © 2012 Magnolia Press · 57
EVIOTA ATRIVENTRIS
Paratypes: ROM 88226, 7 males 9.2–13.9 mm, 7 females 11.4–16.7 mm, taken with holotype; ROM 84482,
17.8 mm male, Palau, Sonsoral Island, southwest islands, east coast Sonsoral 2/3rds way south from north tip,
05º19’18” N, 132º E, 20–36 m, corals and various algae, rotenone, field number RW08-02, R. Winterbottom, M.
Westneat, J.Williams, W. Holleman, B. Hubley, M. Winterbottom, and C. McCord, 11 September 2008. ROM
84498, 17.3 mm female, Palau, off southeast tip of Pulo Anna, about 10 m from surf line, 04º39’09” N, 131º57’16”
E, 7–15 m, channel, various corals, rotenone, field number RW08-09, R. Winterbottom, M. Westneat, J.Williams,
W. Holleman, B. Hubley, M. Winterbottom, and C. McCord, 13 September 2008. ROM 74922, 20 males
10.7–18.2 mm, 19 females 10.4–17.4 mm, 23 immature 6.6–10.2 mm, Palau, west coast of Babeldaob Island, off
Aimeliik coast, 07º28’ 53.9”N, 134º27’28.8”E, Padina on mixed sand substrate, 13.7-19.8 m, rotenone, R. Winter-
bottom, B. Hubley, A. Bauman, D. Winterbottom, A. Hilman-Kitalong, and L. Pendleton, 19 May 2004. BPBM
41084, 2 males 12.7–13.3 mm, 2 females 13.4–13.5 mm, taken with ROM 74922. CAS 233514, 3 males 15.4–16.2
mm, 3 females 12.6–14.6 mm, taken with ROM 74922. OMNH- P38332 13.5 mm male, P38333 14.2 mm male,
P38334 13.3 mm female, P38335 13.4 mm female, all taken with ROM 74922. USNM 402735, 2 males 13.3–14.0
mm, 2 females 12.6–13.7 mm. WAM P.33535-001, 2 males 13.8–15.1 mm, 2 females 12.7–14.3 mm, taken with
ROM 74922.
Other material examined. Eviota pellucida, BPBM 18585, paratypes; BPBM 28893; BPBM 28993; OMNH
35616; Eviota prasites, CAS 233666; Eviota spilota, ROM 74562, ROM 84525.
Diagnosis. The following combination of characters distinguishes E. atriventris from congeners: Abdomen
with black peritoneum that is clearly visible externally; dorsal/anal formula 8/7; pectoral-fin rays simple; length of
5th pelvic-fin ray 40% or greater of 4th ray; genital papilla in male not fimbriate; cephalic sensory-pore system pat-
tern group 2 (only IT missing).
FIGURE 3. Underwater photograph of Eviota pellucida, male, Amami-oshima Island, the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Photo-
graph by H. Kanehara.
Description. Dorsal-fin rays VI+I,8 (7[1], 8[29],9[1]); anal-fin rays I,7 (7[30],8[1]); unbranched pectoral-fin
rays 14 (13[5], 14[30], 15[7]; fifth pelvic-fin ray 46.3% of 4th ray (40.0–63.6, 40.3); 3 branches on 4th ray (3–5);
4–9 segments between consecutive branches of 4th pelvic-fin ray; 11 branched caudal-fin rays; 17 segmented cau-
dal-fin rays; 23 lateral scale rows (23–24); transverse scale rows 7, embedded cycloid scales on breast; first four
spines of dorsal fin filamentous in males, the 4th the longest, extending to caudal-fin base when depressed; genital
papilla in male not fimbriate, bilobed at tip and usually extending to or past first anal-fin ray; cephalic sensory-pore
system pattern group 2 (only IT missing).
GREENFIELD & SUZUKI
58 · Zootaxa 3197 © 2012 Magnolia Press
Measurements (based on holotype and nine paratypes, 13.9–18.2 mm). Head length 31.0 (29.8–33.9, 32.0);
origin of first dorsal fin 35.1 (33.9–36.9, 35.7); origin of second dorsal fin 55.5 (54.9–60.1, 56.8); origin of anal fin
55.5 (55.5–66.5, 61.0); caudal-peduncle length 24.4 (24.3–28.4, 25.9); caudal-peduncle depth 15.8 (12.0–15.8,
14.1); body depth 25.4 (22.0–27.2, 24.3); eye diameter 11.1 (10.4–12.9, 11.2); snout length 5.3 (4.3–6.3, 5.3); pec-
toral-fin length 35.1 (30.7–36.1, 33.6); pelvic-fin length 30.4 (27.4–36.0, 32.0).
FIGURE 4. Underwater photograph of Eviota pellucida, female, Amamki-oshima Island, the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Photo-
graph by H. Kanehara.
FIGURE 5. Eviota pellucida, drawing of holotype by H. K. Larson. Figure 1 from Copeia 1976 (3):499.
Color in preservative of holotype (Fig. 7). Background color of head and body pale yellowish. Abdomen with
black peritoneum that is clearly visible externally. A light peppering of small dark chromatophores on ventral half
of body, no markings on dorsal half of body. Pectoral-fin base with a band of scattered small dark chromatophores
on upper two-thirds. A short line of dark chromatophores extending posteriorly from middle of eye onto opercle.
A light peppering of dark chromatophores between eye and upper jaw. Three sharply defined dark lines on snout
(Fig. 8). One extending from front of interorbital area down snout to a point in line with front of eyes; one extend-
ing from each posterior nostril in front of eye to almost end of snout. A small round dark spot on top of center of
Zootaxa 3197 © 2012 Magnolia Press · 59
EVIOTA ATRIVENTRIS
upper jaw. Nape just behind eyes with a slight dusky area (most paratypes have distinct lines on the nape extending
back from the eyes; one behind the PITO pore and one on each side towards the SOT pores –Fig. 8). Pectoral and
pelvic fins clear.
FIGURE 6. Eviota atriventris, fresh holotype, ROM 76339, 17.1mm SL. Photograph by R. Winterbottom.
FIGURE 7. Eviota atriventris, preserved holotype, ROM 76399, 17.1 mm SL. Photograph by D.W. Greenfield.
GREENFIELD & SUZUKI
60 · Zootaxa 3197 © 2012 Magnolia Press
Color of fresh holotype (Fig. 6). Background color of head and body red-orange. Abdomen black with a hori-
zontal white line crossing the center of the area. Remainder of lower half of body from anal-fin origin to caudal-fin
base dusky. A faint yellowish line just above the vertebral column extending back from the head to the caudal-fin
base. A similar shorter line running along the top of the dark abdomen. Eye with a black pupil surrounded by an
iris that is golden dorsally and red ventrally; a red-orange line passing through center of eye and a white line below
that. Dorsal, anal and caudal fins covered with fine dark chromatophores, red-orange entering onto their bases
from the body.
Color in life (Fig. 1). Background color of body a translucent red-orange. Abdomen black with a bright white
horizontal line crossing the center of the black area. A narrow golden line running from the top of the head just
above the vertebral column back to the caudal-fin base. Anterior end of this line splitting into two lines extending
forward to the eyes. A narrow golden line running from the tip of the snout back across the eye just above the pupil
and onto the body above the black area of the abdomen, ending at back of black area. Another short, narrow
golden line on eye just below pupil. Ventral surface of body from anal-fin origin to caudal-fin base with a narrow
golden line. Ventral surface of head and belly a pale translucent cream. Rays of all fins red-orange, membranes
with fine dark chromatophores.
FIGURE 8. Eviota atriventris, head of CAS 233514, paratype, 13.5 mm female. Photograph by D.W. Greenfield.
Distribution. Known from the Ryukyu Islands-Japan, Palau Islands, Philippine Islands, Indonesia, Papua
New Guinea, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia (Fig. 9).
Etymology. The specific epithet is an adjective combining the Latin atrus (black) and venter (belly), referring
to the black pigment in the area of the abdomen.
Comparisons. Eviota atriventris differs from all other species in the genus by its distinctive color pattern of a
black abdomen when preserved and in life or fresh with a white line crossing the center of the black area. Eviota
atriventris belongs to cephalic sensory-pore group 2, lacking only the IT pore, has simple pectoral-fin rays, a dor-
sal/anal fin-ray formula almost always 8/7, and the 5th pelvic-fin ray longer than 30% of the length of the 4th ray.
There are only two other Eviota species that share these characters: E. prasites Jordan and Seale, and E. pellucida
Larson and neither have a black abdomen. Eviota pellucida has a modal number of pectoral-fin rays of 16, whereas
E. atriventris has a mode of 14 (Table 1). In addition, E. prasites as a distinctive dark spot at the top of the pecto-
ral-fin base, and E. pellucida may have a less distinctive dusky spot that is lacking in E. atriventris. Eviota prasites
often also has a dark spot at the caudal-fin base that is lacking in E. atriventris. In life both E. prasites and E. pel-
Zootaxa 3197 © 2012 Magnolia Press · 61
EVIOTA ATRIVENTRIS
lucida may have small red spots on the dorsal and caudal fins, whereas E. atriventris lacks spots. Other described
Eviota species in cephalic sensory-pore group 2 that share the above characters except that the 5th pelvic-fin ray is
10% or less of the 4th ray instead of being 30% or longer, are E. nigrispina Greenfield & Ssuzuki and E. rubriceps
Greenfield & Jewett which both have the ventral half of the entire body dark, E. storthynx Rofen which has a dark
postocular spot and the caudal fin crossed by distinct lines of pigment, and E. ancora Greenfield & Suzuki that has
five irregular bands of circles of chromatophores crossing the caudal fin and a J-shaped orange mark on the side of
the head when alive or fresh.
TABLE 1. Pectoral-fin ray counts for Eviota atriventris and E. pellucida.
Prior to the capture of E. pellucida at Ishigaki-jima Island, the Ryukyu Islands, Japan (OMNH-P.35616: Fig.
2), this species was only known from the type localities of Guam in the Mariana Islands and Abaiang Atoll in the
Gilbert Islands (Larson, 1976 & Lachner & Karnella, 1980). Therefore E. pellucida at Ishigaki-jima Island is the
first Japanese record of the species (New Japanese name: Kojika isohaze). Here it also is recorded from Ponape
(USNM 22302 & 223023, pers. comm. Susan Jewett) and Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands (BPBM 28893 &
28993) (Fig. 9). All other literature records appear to be E. atriventris. Eviota pellucida is most easily confused
with E. prasites and E. spilota. Eviota spilota almost always has a second dorsal-fin count of I,9, whereas it is
almost always I,8 in E. pellucida. Eviota prasites has a distinctive dark spot at the top of the pectoral-fin base
whereas there only may be a dusky area there in E. pellucida. Eviota prasites also has a dusky spot at the bottom of
the caudal-fin base that is lacking in E. pellucida. Finally, in life E. prasites has seven white blotches extending
along the side just above the red area over the vertebral column, the first starting above the two white blotches on
the pectoral-fin base (Fig. 10), whereas there are eight in E. pellucida (Figs. 3 & 4).
FIGURE 9. Distribution of Eviota atriventris (circles) and E. pellucida (squares).
13 14 15 16
Eviota atriventris 5 30 7
Eviota pellucida 2 16
GREENFIELD & SUZUKI
62 · Zootaxa 3197 © 2012 Magnolia Press
FIGURE 10. Underwater photograph of Eviota prasites, male, Amami-oshima Island, the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Photograph
by H. Kanehara.
Acknowledgments
We would like to thank Susan L. Jewett for making her notes on Eviota pellucida available to us. Helen K. Larson
and ASIH gave permission for us to use her drawing of E. pellucida that was published in Copeia. R. Winterbot-
tom provided photographs of the holotype and arranged for the loan of specimens he collected. H. Lopez-Fernan-
dez and E. Holm of the ROM provided support, as did Jeffrey T. Williams and the staff at the USNM. Arnold
Suzumoto of the BPBM kindly sent us specimens. John E. Randall allowed us to use his underwater photograph of
E. atriventris. We wish to express our sincere gratitude to Hiroyuki Kanehare (Diving Service Amaniensis,
Amami-oshima Island, the Ryukyu Islands) who provided underwater photographs of E. pellucida and E. prasites.
The staff of the California Academy of Sciences as usual has provided continual support: D. Catania, J. Fong, M.
Hoang, T. Iwamoto, and L. Rocha.
References
Akihito, K., Sakamoto, A., Iwata & Ikeda, Y. (1993) Cephalic sensory organs of the gobioid fishes, p. 1088–1116. In: Fishes of Japan
with pictorial keys to the species. T. Nakabo (ed.). Tokai University Press, Tokyo, Japan [In Japanese]. 1474 pp.
Ikeda, Y., Yano, K. & Suzuki, T. (2003) First record of Eviota pellucida (Perciformes: Gobioidei) from Japan. I.O.P. Diving News,
14(12), 2–5. [In Japanese]
Laboute, P. & Grandperrin, R. (2000) Poissons de Nouvelle-Calédonie. Institut de Recherché pour le Développement, Nouméa, 520
pp.
Lachner, E.A. & Karnella, S.J. (1980) Fishes of the Indo-Pacific genus Eviota with descriptions of eight new species (Teleostei:Gobi-
idae). Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, No. 315, 1–127.
Larson, H.K. (1976) A new species of Eviota with discussion of the nominal genera Eviota and Eviotops. Copeia 1976(3), 498–502.
Myers, R.F. (1999) Micronesian reef fishes: A comprehensive guide to the coral reef fishes of Micronesia. 3rd edition. Coral Graphics,
Guam, 330 pp.
Nakabo, T (Ed.). (2002) Fishes of Japan with pictorial keys to the species. English edition. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, 2 vols.,
1749 pp.
Randall, J.E. (1997) In life color of 13 Indo-Pacific gobies of the genus Eviota. I.O.P. Diving News, 8(7), 4–7.
Randall, J.E. (2005) Reef and shore fishes of the South Pacific: New Caledonia to Tahiti and the Pitcairn Islands. University of
Hawai’i Press, Honolulu, HI, 707 pp.
Senou, H., Suzuki, T., Shibukawa, K. & Yano, K. (2004) A photographic guide to the gobioid fishes of Japan. Heibonsha Co., Tokyo,
Japan [In Japanese], 536 pp.
Saruwatari, T., Lopez, J.A. & Pietsch, T.W. (1997) Cyanine blue: a versatile and harmless stain for specimen observations. Copeia,
1997 (4), 840–841.
... This arrangement, however, is already sufficient to perceive at least near red fluorescence (600-650 nm). This has for instance been inferred from the degree of overlap between the twin cone sensitivity (λ max = 540 nm) and fluorescence peaking at 606 nm in the benthic goby Eviota pellucida (now E. atriventris, Greenfield and Suzuki, 2012) (Michiels et al., 2008). Behavioral evidence confirms this assumption in at least three fish species with "regular" LWS receptors (λ max < 540 nm). ...
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... Among the New Caledonian marine species, 905 were recorded from the East Coral Sea, including the Chesterfield Islands, 193 from the New Caledonian Basin, 1860 from the Grande Terre group, 85 from the Norfolk Ridge and 1029 from the Loyalty Ridge including the Loyalty Islands; the ichthyofauna of the Matthew-Hunter Ridge was mostly unknown, with just 28 species reported from the region. Subsequently, the following species have been described: Microbrotula hamata (Bythitidae) from Grande Terre, described by Schwarzhans & Nielsen (2011); Samariscus neocaledonia (Samaridae) from the northern Norfolk Ridge, described by Kawai et al. (2011); Bathyraja leucomelanos (Arhynchobatidae) from the Coriolis Bank in the eastern Coral Sea, by Iglésias & Lévy-Hartmann (2012); Eviota atriventris (Gobiidae) from Grande Terre, by Greenfield & Suzuki (2012); Glossogobius illimis (Gobiidae) from Grande Terre, by Hoese & Allen (2012); Hoplostethus grandperrini (Trachichthyidae) from the Norfolk Ridge, by Roberts & Gomon (2012); Phenacoscorpius longilineatus (Scorpaenidae) from the Norfolk Ridge, by Motomura et al. (2012); Siphamia fraseri and Siphamia spinicola (Apogonidae) from Grande Terre, by Gon & Allen (2012); Apristurus nakayai (Pentanchidae) from the eastern Coral Sea, by Iglésias (2013); Chaunax reticulatus (Chaunacidae) from the Norfolk Ridge, by Ho et al. (2013b); Epigonus lifouensis (Epigonidae) from the Loyalty Islands, by Okamoto & Motomura (2013); Gymnocranius satoi and Gymnocranius superciliosus (Lethrinidae) from Grande Terre and the Chesterfield Islands, by Borsa et al. (2013); Malthopsis asperata and Malthopsis parva (Ogcocephalidae) from the northern Norfolk Ridge, by Ho et al. (2013a); Lophiodes iwamotoi (Lophiidae) was recorded from the southern Loyalty Ridge, New Caledonia by Ho & Chen (2013); and Chaunacops spinosus (Chaunacidae) was described from the eastern Coral Sea by Ho & McGrouther (2015). The description of a new species of Centrodraco Regan 1913 (Draconettidae) from the southern Loyalty Ridge (Fricke, in press) and a new record of Parapercis fusco- lineata Fourmanoir 1985 (Pinguipedidae) from the New Caledonian EEZ (Ho et al., in press) will be published soon. ...
Article
New records of fish species are reported from New Caledonia, including Polyipnus aquavitus Baird, 1971 (Sternoptychidae), Porogadus melampeplus (Alcock, 1896) (Ophidiidae), Hoplichthys citrinus Gilbert 1905 (Hoplichthyidae), Plectrogenium nanum Gilbert 1905 (Plectrogeniidae), Lioscorpius trifasciatus Last, Yearsley & Motomura 2005 (Setarchidae), Neomerinthe megalepis Fowler 1938 and Phenacoscorpius megalops Fowler 1938 (Scorpaenidae), Ocosia apia Poss & Eschmeyer, 1975 (Tetrarogidae), Hoplostethus atlanticus Collett 1889 (Trachichthyidae), Zenion longipinnis Kotthaus, 1970 (Zeniontidae), Plectranthias foresti Fourmanoir 1977, Plectranthias pelicieri Randall & Shimizu, 1994, Plectranthias rubrifasciatus Fourmanoir & Randall, 1979 and Rabaulichthys squirei Randall & Walsh, 2010 (Serranidae), Synagrops philippinensis (Günther 1880) (Acropomatidae), Stegastes insularis Allen & Emery 1995 (Pomacentridae), Cirrhilabrus rubrimarginatus Randall 1992 (Labridae), Pteropsaron neocaledonicus Fourmanoir & Rivaton, 1979 (Percophidae), Centrodraco ornatus (Fourmanoir & Rivaton, 1979) and Draconetta xenica Jordan & Fowler 1903 (Draconettidae), and Acanthurus maculiceps (Ahl 1923) (Acanthuridae). A record of Plectropomus maculatus (Bloch 1790) (Serranidae) from Grande Terre, New Caledonia is confirmed. This paper also includes new depth records of Zenion longipinnis, Plectranthias rubrifasciatus, Synagrops philippinensis, Centrodraco ornatus and Draconetta xenica.
... Among the New Caledonian marine species, 905 were recorded from the East Coral Sea, including the Chesterfield Islands, 193 from the New Caledonian Basin, 1860 from the Grande Terre group, 85 from the Norfolk Ridge and 1029 from the Loyalty Ridge including the Loyalty Islands; the ichthyofauna of the Matthew-Hunter Ridge was mostly unknown, with just 28 species reported from the region. Subsequently, the following species have been described: Microbrotula hamata (Bythitidae) from Grande Terre, described by Schwarzhans & Nielsen (2011); Samariscus neocaledonia (Samaridae) from the northern Norfolk Ridge, described by Kawai et al. (2011); Bathyraja leucomelanos (Arhynchobatidae) from the Coriolis Bank in the eastern Coral Sea, by Iglésias & Lévy-Hartmann (2012); Eviota atriventris (Gobiidae) from Grande Terre, by Greenfield & Suzuki (2012); Glossogobius illimis (Gobiidae) from Grande Terre, by Hoese & Allen (2012); Hoplostethus grandperrini (Trachichthyidae) from the Norfolk Ridge, by Roberts & Gomon (2012); Phenacoscorpius longilineatus (Scorpaenidae) from the Norfolk Ridge, by Motomura et al. (2012); Siphamia fraseri and Siphamia spinicola (Apogonidae) from Grande Terre, by Gon & Allen (2012); Apristurus nakayai (Pentanchidae) from the eastern Coral Sea, by Iglésias (2013); Chaunax reticulatus (Chaunacidae) from the Norfolk Ridge, by Ho et al. (2013b); Epigonus lifouensis (Epigonidae) from the Loyalty Islands, by Okamoto & Motomura (2013); Gymnocranius satoi and Gymnocranius superciliosus (Lethrinidae) from Grande Terre and the Chesterfield Islands, by Borsa et al. (2013); Malthopsis asperata and Malthopsis parva (Ogcocephalidae) from the northern Norfolk Ridge, by Ho et al. (2013a); Lophiodes iwamotoi (Lophiidae) was recorded from the southern Loyalty Ridge, New Caledonia by Ho & Chen (2013); and Chaunacops spinosus (Chaunacidae) was described from the eastern Coral Sea by Ho & McGrouther (2015). The description of a new species of Centrodraco Regan 1913 (Draconettidae) from the southern Loyalty Ridge (Fricke, in press) and a new record of Parapercis fusco- lineata Fourmanoir 1985 (Pinguipedidae) from the New Caledonian EEZ (Ho et al., in press) will be published soon. ...
Article
New records of fish species are reported from New Caledonia, including Polyipnus aquavitus Baird 1971 (STERNOPTYCHIDAE), Porogadus melampeplus (Alcock 1896) (OPHIDIIDAE), Hoplichthys citrinus Gilbert 1905 (HOPLICHTHYIDAE), Plectrogenium nanum Gilbert 1905 (PLECTROGENIIDAE), Lioscorpius trifasciatus Last, Yearsley & Motomura 2005 (SETARCHIDAE), Neomerinthe megalepis Fowler 1938 and Phenacoscorpius megalops Fowler 1938 (SCORPAENIDAE), Ocosia apia Poss & Eschmeyer 1975 (TETRAROGIDAE), Hoplostethus atlanticus Collett 1889 (TRACHICHTHYIDAE), Zenion longipinnis Kotthaus 1970 (ZENIONTIDAE), Plectranthias foresti Fourmanoir 1977, P. pelicieri Randall & Shimizu 1994, P. rubrifasciatus Fourmanoir & Randall 1979 and Rabaulichthys squirei Randall & Walsh 2010 (SERRANIDAE), Synagrops philippinensis (Günther 1880) (ACROPOMATIDAE), Stegastes insularis Allen & Emery 1995 (POMACENTRIDAE), Cirrhilabrus rubrimarginatus Randall 1992 (LABRIDAE), Pteropsaron neocaledonicus Fourmanoir & Rivaton 1979 (PERCOPHIDAE), Centrodraco ornatus (Fourmanoir & Rivaton 1979) and Draconetta xenica Jordan & Fowler 1903 (DRACONETTIDAE), and Acanthurus maculiceps (Ahl 1923) (ACANTHURIDAE). A record of Plectropomus maculatus (Bloch 1790) (SERRANIDAE) from Grande Terre, New Caledonia is confirmed. This paper also includes new depth records of Zenion longipinnis, Plectranthias rubrifasciatus, Synagrops philippinensis, Centrodraco ornatus and Draconetta xenica.
Article
On coral reefs, many small coral-associated fishes exhibit high levels of habitat specialisation, which can contribute to their susceptibility to habitat loss. However, high levels of habitat partitioning may buffer communities from the loss of particular habitat types. This study provides a quantitative evaluation of habitat specialisation, substratum selectivity and habitat overlap of 9 Eviota (Gobiidae) species in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea. All but 1 locally common Eviota species were strongly associated with scleractinian coral substrata, and species ranged from habitat generalists to obligate coral specialists with some of the most extreme fine-scale patterns of habitat specialisation known for coral reef fishes. Patterns of substratum selectivity varied greatly within the genus, but many species showed distinct preferences for particular corals, most notably the scleractinian genera Acropora and Porites . Most species exhibited low habitat overlap and partitioned habitat on a fine spatial scale, but there were notable exceptions. Two Acropora coral specialists and some species with strong preference for massive Porites coral exhibited high overlap. Overall, the local abundance of Eviota species varied in relation to the degree of habitat specialisation, with the most generalised species more abundant than the habitat specialists. Habitat structure and species-specific differences in habitat specialisation, substratum selectivity and habitat overlap are likely to be key drivers explaining the distribution and abundance of Eviota species and the local community structure. Most importantly, many coral-dependent and less abundant species of Eviota may be vulnerable to habitat loss as a result of the ongoing degradation of coral reefs.
Article
Two new dwarfgobies, Eviota amamiko and Eviota perspicilla, are described from southern Japan, based on 3 (Ryukyu Islands) and 22 (Satsuma Peninsula and Koshiki, Osumi, and Amami islands) specimens, respectively. Eviota amamiko, belonging to a group lacking cephalic sensory-canal pores, can be distinguished from all other members of Eviota in having the following combination of characters: dorsal/anal fin-ray formula 8/8; 14 or 15 pectoral-fin rays; 5th pelvic-fin ray absent or rudimentary; urogenital papillae of both sexes not fimbriate; five dark brown irregularly shaped (usually X- or Y-like) bars on body; two narrow diagonal red lines below eye; anal-fin base with two reddish-brown spots; no dark spots on caudal peduncle over preural centrum; and caudal-fin base without crescentic marks. Although similar to Eviota japonica Jewett and Lachner 1983, Eviota prasina (Klunzinger 1871), and Eviota queenslandica Whitley 1932, E. perspicilla is clearly distinct from all other congeners in having the following combination of characters: cephalic sensory-canal pore system pattern 2 [lacking only pore H (IT)]; dorsal/anal fin-ray formula 9/8; some pectoral-fin rays branched; dorsal-fin spine not filamentous in both sexes; pelvic fin very long, its tip usually beyond anal-fin origin when appressed [length 26.7–38.9 (mean 34.7) % of standard length]; urogenital papillae of both sexes not fimbriate; five dark postanal bars (spots in preserved specimens) and two dark postocular spots present; two dark spots on pectoral-fin base; no dark spots under pectoral-fin base; distinct dark caudal-peduncle spot over preural centrum; and spinous dorsal fin blackish overall, with two small translucent white circular spots on its base.
Article
A comprehensive list of fishes from Amami-oshima Island, the Ryukyu Islands, Japan, is reported for the first time on the basis of collected specimens and literature surveys. A total of 1615 species (618 genera, 175 families and 35 orders) are recorded with specimen registration numbers (if present), localities and literature references. Preliminary comparisons of fish faunas of the island with those of four island regions (Kashiwa-jima Island, the Ogasa wara Islands, Okinawa-jima Island and Yaku-shima Island) in southern Japan show that the fish fauna of Amamioshima Island is most similar to that of Okinawa-jima Island.
Article
Full-text available
Two new species from the Indian Ocean are described, Eviota notata and Eviota springeri. Eviota notata has a complete cephalic sensory pore system (pattern 1), a dorsal/anal fin-ray formula of 7/7, some branched pectoral-fin rays, and three prominent dark transverse marks on the nape. Eviota notata is known from the Seychelle Islands, Mauritius, and Chagos Archipelago. Eviota springeri lacks the IT pore belonging to cephalic sensory pore system pattern 2, has a dorsal/anal finray formula of 8/7, unbranched pectoral-fin rays, and a small fifth pelvic-fin ray. Eviota springeri is known from the Seychelle Islands, Mauritius, Chagos Archipelago, and the Amirante Islands. An Errata concerning the type material of Eviota atriventris Greenfield & Suzuki is presented.
Article
A new species of Eviota (Gobiidae), with unbranched pectoral rays, is described. The characteristics previously used to distinguish Eviotops from Eviota are shown to be inadequate to justify generic separation. Eviotops is regarded here as a synonym of Eviota.
First record of Eviota pellucida
  • Y Ikeda
  • K Yano
  • T Suzuki
Ikeda, Y., Yano, K. & Suzuki, T. (2003) First record of Eviota pellucida (Perciformes: Gobioidei) from Japan. I.O.P. Diving News, 14(12), 2-5. [In Japanese]
Micronesian reef fishes: A comprehensive guide to the coral reef fishes of Micronesia. 3 rd edition
  • R F Myers
Myers, R.F. (1999) Micronesian reef fishes: A comprehensive guide to the coral reef fishes of Micronesia. 3 rd edition. Coral Graphics, Guam, 330 pp.
In life color of 13 Indo-Pacific gobies of the genus Eviota
  • J E Randall
Randall, J.E. (1997) In life color of 13 Indo-Pacific gobies of the genus Eviota. I.O.P. Diving News, 8(7), 4-7.
Reef and shore fishes of the South Pacific: New Caledonia to Tahiti and the Pitcairn Islands
  • J E Randall
Randall, J.E. (2005) Reef and shore fishes of the South Pacific: New Caledonia to Tahiti and the Pitcairn Islands. University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu, HI, 707 pp.
A photographic guide to the gobioid fishes of Japan
  • H Senou
  • T Suzuki
  • K Shibukawa
  • K Yano
Senou, H., Suzuki, T., Shibukawa, K. & Yano, K. (2004) A photographic guide to the gobioid fishes of Japan. Heibonsha Co., Tokyo, Japan [In Japanese], 536 pp.
Poissons de Nouvelle-Calédonie
  • P Laboute
  • R Grandperrin
Laboute, P. & Grandperrin, R. (2000) Poissons de Nouvelle-Calédonie. Institut de Recherché pour le Développement, Nouméa, 520 pp.