Article

The Italian bricoleur -Teaching Participatory Design in Australia

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

Introduction This paper discusses an experience in teaching Participatory Design (PD) and its application to Information Systems (IS) to undergraduate students within an Australian context and from an Italian (Mediterranean?) perspective. This paper is divided into six sections. The first provides some background details to help the reader contextualize the case study within its Italian-Australian domain. The second part offers an overview of the author's epistemological and ontological beliefs to better locate her teaching approach while the third part discusses her methodology. The fourth section provides a brief summary of how the teaching and learning curriculum was structured and the fifth part overviews the case study. The final section emphasizes some learned lessons from the experience.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
This paper attempts to put into context the issues which surround the endeavours of researchers working in the field of Art and Design, in particular the philosophy and context of research procedures / methodologies. The introduction provides some definitions of methodology and its importance in the general context of inquiry and research, historically and actually supranational in essence; characteristics of existing methodologies in Science (Newtonian and Quantum) and Social Sciences are examined; characteristics of ‘artistic method’ are elaborated, especially through an examination of Fine Art and Design Methodologies in relation to practice; common factors linking creative, scientific and artistic procedures are identified; ‘Postmodern Methodology’ is discussed, in relation to current ‘paradigm shifts’; existing & new procedures / methodologies and devices / tools are identified, and future developments proposed.
Article
Full-text available
The movement of digital technologies out of the workplace brings with it the need to develop new techniques to consider how technology might relate to and support everyday activities in a wide variety of different contexts. In our own case, our user groups consist of former psychiatric patients and disabled people living in residential care settings. Methods for identifying user needs in care settings are not well developed and the situation presents a very complex set of design challenges. In particular, the highly personal and sensitive character of such settings presents conventional observational techniques, such as ethnography, with obdurate problems that make direct observation intrusive, disruptive and inappropriate on many occasions. Direct observation requires supplementation in such settings. Accordingly, we report on our experiences of adapting Cultural Probes to open up communication channels and foster an ongoing dialogue with the members of our user groups in order to generate key insights into their unique needs.
Article
Full-text available
The concept of sustainable product-service systems has emerged recently, and is distinct from the ideas of cleaner production, eco-design and design for the environment. The concept goes beyond the environmental optimisation of products and processes and requires radical and creative thinking to reduce environmental impacts by a factor of between four and 20 times while maintaining an acceptable quality of service. Sustainable product-services consider alternative socio-technical systems that can provide the essential end-use function, such as warmth or mobility, that an existing product offers. Four types are outlined—result services; shared utilisation services; product-life extension services; and demand side management. Sustainable product-service systems attempt to create designs that are sustainable in terms of environmental burden and resource use, whilst developing product concepts as parts of sustainable whole systems, that provide a service or function to meet essential needs.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As a part of a European Union sponsored project, we haveproposed a system which aggregates peoples expressions over awidening network of public electronic displays in a massive Dutchhousing development. Reflecting ideas from contemporary arts aswell as from research on media spaces, this is an example of aconceptual design intended to produce meaningful effects on a localculture. In this paper, we describe the methods and ideas that ledto this proposal, as an example of research on technologies fromthe traditions of artist-designers.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We describe a new method for use in the process of co-designing technologies with users called technology probes. Technology probes are simple, flexible, adaptable technologies with three interdisciplinary goals: the social science goal of understanding the needs and desires of users in a real-world setting, the engineering goal of field-testing the technology, and the design goal of inspiring users and researchers to think about new technologies. We present the results of designing and deploying two technology probes, the messageProbe and the videoProbe, with diverse families in France, Sweden, and the U.S. We conclude with our plans for creating new technologies for and with families based on our experiences.
Article
How, asks Françoise Dastur, can philosophy account for the sudden happening and the factuality of the event? Dastur asks how phenomenology, in particular the work of Heidegger, Husserl, and Merleau-Ponty, may be interpreted as offering such an account. She argues that the "paradoxical capacity of expecting surprise is always in question in phenomenology," and for this reason, she concludes, "We should not oppose phenomenology and the thinking of the event. We should connect them; open-ness to phenomena must be identified with openness to unpredictability." The article offers reflections in these terms on a phenomenology of birth. Abstract
Article
Featuring new essays by such prominent cultural theorists as Tony Bennett, Homi Bhabha, Donna Haraway, bell hooks, Constance Penley, Janice Radway, Andrew Ross, and Cornel West, Cultural Studies offers numerous specific cultural analyses while simultaneously defining and debating the common body of assumptions, questions, and concerns that have helped create the field. © 1992 by Routledge, Taylor and Francis Inc. All rights reserved.
Article
This article addresses the potential strengths and weaknesses of alternative forms of data representation. As educational researchers become increasingly interested in the relationship between form of representation and form of understanding, new representational forms are being used to cońvey to "readers" what has been learned. These explorations are rooted in an expanding conception of the nature of knowledge and the relationship between what one knows and how it is represented. While new forms of representation have their potential virtues, they also have their limitations. The uses and limitations of these new methods are addressed in what follows.
Article
In this paper, the Presence team describes how, by thinking of older people as active participants in society, rather than as needy and dependent, innovative designs have been developed for systems that help elderly people remain part of the community. The team has done this by involving users in the design process by, engaging them in a dialogue with designers that has allowed both sides to influence each other.
Article
This book describes a project on designing spaces for young children; the aim of the project is to enable a "meeting of minds" between the pedagogical philosophy of Reggio Emilia preschools and the innovative experiences within the culture of design and architecture. The book presents the project in three main sections: (1) a critical analysis of the cumulative experience of the municipal early childhood system of Reggio Emilia, with the aim of formulating general criteria of quality and presenting possible scenarios, using keywords and metaphors, in an attempt to identify the desirable characteristics of a space for young children; (2) reflections on the tools of design, with indications regarding both the distribution of space and the "soft qualities" (light, color, materials, smell, sound, microclimate), to provide tools of analysis and practical indications for both the interior and exterior design of infant-toddler centers and schools for young children; and (3) essays discussing the pedagogical and architecture/design issues that form the theoretical basis of the project, a product of studies carried out in the municipal preschools of Reggio Emilia and at Domus Academy as part of the joint research project. (EV)
Article
In "Composing Ethnography," different scholars use their own everyday life experiences and those of their research Ss to tackle [various ethnographic and social issues]. . . . By telling their stories through memoirs, poetry, photography, and other creative forms usually associated with the arts, the authors demonstrate how ethnographic data can be converted into memorable experiences [through written means] that readers can use in the classroom and everyday life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
1. Background This paper argues that the teaching of Participatory Design opens up opportunities for the learner as well as the teacher to engage in participatory teaching and learning activities. Using as a case study an educational journey I undertook in 2003, I stress that the core value of these teaching and learning activities revolves around the process (of learning, teaching and designing) rather than the specific outcome. To facilitate a deep understanding of the case study, I will provide in the next section an overview of my teaching and learning methodology and some necessary definitions to locate the experience from a design and pedagogical point of view. 1.1 Teaching and Learning philosophy From a pedagogical perspective I have an orientation and commitment towards constructivist principles. I therefore comfortably sit within participative learning methods. Constructivism, based on the developmental work of Piaget [1978] and Kelly [1955], looks at cognition as a mental construction. In the teaching and learning field in particular, the learner learns through experience and by reflecting on experiences, in a situation where the context is regarded as highly influential on the learning process. Within this paradigm learners create their own knowledge though questioning, explorating and reflecting – they become expert in learning and indeed they learn how to learn -while teachers facilitate both the learning and reflection processes. 1.2 Participatory Design Participatory Design [Schuler and Namioka 1993, Sanoff 1990] has its roots in Scandinavian countries, where collaborative work on the theme of participation between researchers and trade unions has always been based "on a strong commitment to the idea of industrial democracy"[Ehn 1992]. Participatory Design looks at the involvement of users in the design process, where the degree of involvement can vary according to the situation. Normally, the rationale for users' participation is based on three main reasons [Bjerknes and Bratteteig 1995]: o improving the knowledge upon which systems are built, o enabling people to develop realistic expectations, and reducing resistance to change, and o increasing workplace democracy by giving the members of an organisation the right to participate in decisions that are likely to affect their work.
Article
How, asks Françoise Dastur, can philosophy account for the sudden happening and the factuality of the event? Dastur asks how phenomenology, in particular the work of Heidegger, Husserl, and Merleau-Ponty, may be interpreted as offering such an account. She argues that the “paradoxical capacity of expecting surprise is always in question in phenomenology,” and for this reason, she concludes, “We should not oppose phenomenology and the thinking of the event. We should connect them; openness to phenomena must be identified with openness to unpredictability.” The article offers reflections in these terms on a phenomenology of birth.
Chapter
In this chapter we explore some of the innovative ways in which teachers and teacher educators are using visual culture and arts-informed research methods to reinterpret, represent and communicate their self-study research. Our focus is on how educational researchers and teachers are modifying and using these methods to craft artistic representations and interpretations of their self-studies. The reflexive nature of artistic inquiry makes it particularly well-suited to self-study. Section 1 examines the tradition of visual arts-based research and explores its usefulness to self-study. Sections 2–4 of this chapter explore four of the most prevalent modes of visual artistic expression that are being used to interpret and report on self-study in education: (1) performance; (2) photography; (3) video documentary; and, (4) art installations/multi media representations. Each of these sections contains detailed exemplars of these modes of representation. This chapter concludes with questions and quandaries about the uses and interpretation of these modes of inquiry. More detailed exemplars are included on the accompanying CD.
Article
Scitation is the online home of leading journals and conference proceedings from AIP Publishing and AIP Member Societies
Article
Provides a practical guide to the critical reading of ethnographic studies: discussing in detail how to identify the main arguments and what is involved in making an assessment of such studies.
Live like I do" -a PD case study using Cultural Probes', paper presented to PDC 2004 the eighth biennial Participatory Design Conference
  • D Loi
  • M Voderberg
  • B Liney
  • S Marwah
  • P Manrique
  • G Piu
Loi, D., Voderberg, M., Liney, B., Marwah, S., Manrique, P. & Piu, G. 2004, 'Live like I do" -a PD case study using Cultural Probes', paper presented to PDC 2004 the eighth biennial Participatory Design Conference, Toronto, Canada, July 27-31.
The Reflective turn : case studies in and on educational practice
  • D A Schön
Schön, D.A. 1991, The Reflective turn : case studies in and on educational practice, Teachers College Press, New York.
Educating the reflective practitioner, Jossey-Bass higher education series
  • D A Schön
Schön, D.A. 1987, Educating the reflective practitioner, Jossey-Bass higher education series., Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.
Daredevil Research -Re-creating Analytic Practice
  • J A Jipson
  • N Paley
Jipson, J.A. & Paley, N. 1997, Daredevil Research -Re-creating Analytic Practice, Peter Lang Publishing Inc., New York.
Create -Cultural Probes in Teaching and Learning environments', paper presented to PDC 2004 the eighth biennial Participatory Design Conference
  • D Loi
Loi, D. 2004a, 'Document/Reflect/Create -Cultural Probes in Teaching and Learning environments', paper presented to PDC 2004 the eighth biennial Participatory Design Conference, Toronto, Canada, July 27-31.
Cultural probes and the design process', paper presented to ECCE-11
  • T Hemmings
  • A Crabtree
  • T Rodden
Hemmings, T., Crabtree, A. & Rodden, T. 2002, 'Cultural probes and the design process', paper presented to ECCE-11, April 2002.
The art of writing inquiry
  • L Neilsen
  • J G Knowles
  • A L Cole
Neilsen, L., Knowles, J.G. & Cole, A.L. 2001, The art of writing inquiry, Backalong Books, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Methods for empathic design: Observing and probing', paper presented to Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces
  • V Jääskö
  • T Mattelmäki
Jääskö, V. & Mattelmäki, T. 2003, 'Methods for empathic design: Observing and probing', paper presented to Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces, Pittsburgh, 23-26 June.
Toward a Transformational Science: a further look at the scientific merits of action research
  • P Reason
  • W R Torbert
Reason, P. & Torbert, W.R. 2001, 'Toward a Transformational Science: a further look at the scientific merits of action research', Concepts and Transformations, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 1-37, available at: http://www.bath.ac.uk/~mnspwr/Papers/TransformationalSocialScience.htm.
Product-Service Systems -Shifting corporate focus from selling products to selling product-services: a new approach to sustainable development
  • O Mont
Mont, O. 2000, Product-Service Systems -Shifting corporate focus from selling products to selling product-services: a new approach to sustainable development, 288, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency.