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PRESPA LAKE WATERSHED MANAGEMENT PLAN

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Location of the Prespa Lake watershed 6 Figure 2. Topography and slope of Prespa Lake watershed 6 Figure 3. Geology Map and Soil Map 7 Figure 4. Prespa socio-economic maps: Settlements and road network; Land Use 9 Figure 5. Hydrological network in the watershed 10 Figure 6. Delineated surface waterbodies in the watershed 11 Figure 7. Hydrogeological map of the delineated groundwater bodies in the Prespa Lake Watershed 13 Figure 8. Major cations and heavy metals in core samples of Prespa Lake 15 Figure 9. Heavy and toxic metals in core samples of Prespa Lake 15 Figure 10. Total P content measured in recent sediments at the sampling sites of Prespa Lake. 16 Figure 11. Total P and total N core sediments of Lake Prespa 16 Figure 12. Comparative presentation of diatom assemblages retrieved from 0.5-10 ka BP core samples of Prespa Lake and some of the most dominant and characteristic taxa in the investigated core samples 17 Figure 13. Plankton sample from Lake Dojran (August 2010) dominated by Aulacoseira granulata and at least three Microcystis taxa; circular filaments belong to Lynbya contorta 18 Figure 14. Water bloom caused by Anabaena affinis and Anabaena contorta in Prespa Lake waters 18 Figure 15. Cyanotoxins-microcystins in Prespa Lake waters during the 12-month investigation period 19 Figure 16. Sources of pollution in the Prespa watershed 28 Figure 17. Water level decrease of Prespa Lake over the period 1951-2008 31 Figure 18. Water objects in the Prespa Lake Watershed 32 Figure 19. Soil erosion risk map of the Prespa Lake Watershed 36 Figure 20. Nature reserves (protected areas according to the Law on Nature) 37 Figure 21. Map of wetlands around Lake Prespa 38 Figure 22. Existing and newly proposed protection zones 39 Figure 23. Monitoring sites in delineated waterbodies in the Prespa Lake watershed which were continuously monitored during the course of this project 41 Figure 24. Map of the classification of ecological status of waterbodies in the Prespa Lake Watershed 43 Figure 25. Map of the delineated groundwater bodies and monitoring sites 44 Figure 26. BIS (2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate MPL<6 ng/l 45 Figure 27 MPL level for organoclorine pesticide 45
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