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Effects of low power microwaves at 1.8, 2.1, and 2.3 GHz on l-Lactic dehydrogenase and Glutathione peroxidase enzymes

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Radiofrequency/microwave (RF/MW) radiation has been integrated in almost every aspect of today’s modern life and applied in radar, telecommunication systems, health/medical devices, and food sterilization technology. However, the increasing rate of exposures to RF/MW radiation, especially exposures from mobile phones, has raised health concerns and stimulated much research into biological and health effects of low power MWs. The heating effect of the MWs is already well known and documented; however, a doubt remains on the existence of non-thermal biological effects. This study evaluates the effects of low power MWs on kinetics of l-Lactic dehydrogenase and Glutathione peroxidase enzymes irradiated at the frequencies of 1.8, 2.1, and 2.3 GHz and power of 10 dBm using the commercial Transverse Electro-Magnetic cell. The selected frequencies are used frequently in G4 and G5 mobile networks. The findings reveal that MWs at the studied parameters induce changes in the enzymes’ kinetics, which lead to modulation of rate of change in corresponding reactions these enzymes catalyze.
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