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Studio-based learning via wireless notebooks: A case of a Java programming course

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This paper describes Studio-1.00, a project aimed at enhancing active learning techniques, interactive programming and the exploration of software development, by the use of mobile notebooks and electronic classrooms. We report on a study that investigated undergraduates' in-class use of wireless notebooks and their learning gains. The study was conducted for three semesters, using qualitative and quantitative methodologies for data collection and interpretation. The results indicated that Studio-1.00 had a positive effect on students achievements, especially for the intermediate/low-academic level students or those who had little to no earlier knowledge of Java programming. The class observations revealed four main attributes that characterise studio-based learning: (a) hands-on, real-life problem-solving, (b) multi-interactions among learners and instructors, (c) knowledge sharing and (d) receiving immediate feedback. These attributes, which are suggested to enhance students learning gains, could not have been achieved without the in-class use of wireless notebooks., S. (2007) Studio-based learning via wireless notebooks: a case of a Java programming course, Int. past 10 years have focused on developing, integrating and assessing science education curricula at the high school and higher education levels. Her research concerns theories of constructivist learning environments and applications of educational technologies for enhancing such environments. Her studies involve harnessing Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), with emphasis on emerging web capabilities, to foster science teaching and meaningful learning.
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... The transition to an active-learning studio format was based on research showing that students retain concepts better when allowed to practice the assignments immediately after exposure to the concepts. 2,11,13 Furthermore, as Page 25.1140.4 ...
... The emergence of the mobile learning concept coincided with the emergence of many studies that examine its impact in improving and enhancing the educational process such as studies of Stone., Briggs & Smith [3], Seppälä & Alamäki [4], Corlett., Chan., Ting & Sharples [5], Motiwalla [6], Barak., Harward & Lerman [7], Chen., Hsieh., & Kinshu [8], Al-Dahshan & Younis [9], Al-Harthy [10], Al-Fahad [11], Chen & Huang [12], Al-Qahtani [13], Al-Juhani [14] Al-Shamrani [15], Asiri [16] and Khan [17]. A number of conferences have recommended and encouraged the use of mobile learning and to make use of its advantages in a variety of educational institutions and carrying out studies on the possibility of the employment and effectiveness of mobile learning in the educational process [18][19][20]. ...
Chapter
Growing planetary challenges demand environmental consciousness and energetic workforce. The environmental education and education for sustainable development are essential for the knowledge workers so as to intellectually empower them with cognitive skills, analytical abilities and problem solving capabilities leading to the efficient development and implementation of sustainable development policies and programmes. Increasing Access through Mobile Learning for EE and ESD is the need of the hour, especially for developing countries where the use of mobile technology is increasing at a phenomenal rate. Mobile learning will augment the efficacy of participatory teaching and learning methods that motivate and empower learners to change their behaviour and take action for environment and sustainable development. M-Learning enables learners to merge their learning experiences in a shared collaborative environment. This paper shows how mobile learning can transform the delivery of EE and ESD.
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Contribution: Active classroom programmer (ACP) is a software tool that places minimal pressure on resources, and is shown to help improve student learning while also encouraging a high degree of engagement both during and outside of programming lectures. Background: Programming is difficult for students, largely due to the myriad of ever-advancing concepts. As students gradually become stronger programmers, both within a course and within their degree, they are constantly presented with new and challenging programming concepts regardless of their expertise. While laboratory sessions provide an excellent opportunity for students to independently practice, this does not help them in the programming process where expert scaffolding is desired. Intended outcomes: ACP is intended to engage students with active programming exercises and develop an inductive approach to learning, focusing on developing problem-solving skills. Application design: Students need guidance in the programming strategy rather than the syntax and peculiarities of the particular programming language. ACP allows students to program alongside instructors as new concepts are introduced. Findings: Experience from two concept-rich programming courses at different levels is presented, demonstrating students engaged with ACP both inside and outside lectures to deepen their understanding of the programming concepts.
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Chemistry courses in higher education have traditionally been composed of lectures, problem solving sessions, and laboratories. This study describes a Web-based chemistry course and the learning outcomes of freshmen that used it. Chemistry faculty and teaching assistants were interviewed regarding their views about Web-based teaching and learning. Students who took part in a Web-based general chemistry course were divided into two groups based on their preference of participating in a Computerized Molecular Modeling (CMM) project. The experimental group students carried out an individualized project using CMM software to represent a complex molecule in three model types, compute its molecular weight, and construct hybridization and electrical charge distribution for each of the carbon atoms in the molecule. Pre- and post-tests along with final examination grades served for assessing the students' achievements. The 95 experimental students achieved significantly higher grades than their 120 control-group peers in both the post-test and the final examination. The experimental students were able to switch from 1-D to 2- and 3-D molecular representations, argue for selecting an appropriate substance for a particular purpose, and transfer between the four levels of understanding in chemistry better than their control counterparts. Keywords (Audience): High School / Introductory Chemistry
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