Article

Assessment of Heavy Metal Pollution in River Water of Hanoi, Vietnam Using Multivariate Analyses

Asian Center for Environmental Research (ACER), Meisei University, 2-1-1, Hodokubo, Hino, Tokyo 191-8506, Japan.
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology (Impact Factor: 1.26). 08/2009; 83(4):575-82. DOI: 10.1007/s00128-009-9815-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Concentrations of heavy metals in water of the Nhue River (a suburban/rural river) and one of its tributaries, the To Lich River (an urban river), in Hanoi, Vietnam had been monitored, and spatial and seasonal variations in their composition were evaluated by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis. Heavy metal concentrations in water of the two rivers were generally lower than the surface water quality standard in Vietnam, except for manganese in several sites, although they were higher than the median values in freshwater of the world by 0.42-43 times in Nhue and 0.13-32 times in To Lich. The two multivariate analyses represented that the composition of heavy metals in river water of To Lich was distinctly different from that of Nhue. It was also suggested that metal concentrations and their composition in Nhue river water would be affected by inflowing water of To Lich and wastewater discharged from the up- and middle-stream basin, and that they gradually recovered along the direction of water flow in the downstream area in rainy season.

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Available from: Shuzo Tanaka, Jan 28, 2016
    • "Water quality indices are tools, to determine conditions of water quality and, like any other tool, require knowledge about principles and basic concepts of water and related issues (Nikbakht 2004). Several researchers have used water quality indices methods for the assessing quality of waters (Zhang et al. 2009; Kikuchi et al. 2009; Pandey et al. 2009; Giri et al. 2010; Virha et al. 2011; Srivastava et al. 2011; Kumar et al. 2012; Prasanna et al. 2012; Díaz et al. 2013; Giri and Singh 2014; Mahato et al. 2014; Protano et al. 2014; Tiwari et al. 2014; Varghese and Jaya 2014; Panigrahy et al. 2015). However, in recent years much attention has been given towards the evaluation of heavy metal pollution in ground and surface water with the development of a heavy metal pollution index (HPI) (Reddy 1995; Mohan et al. 1996). "
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty eight surface water samples were collected from fourteen sites of the West Bokaro coalfield, India. The concentration of Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, As, Se, Al, Cr, Ba, and Fe were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for determination of seasonal fluctuations and a heavy metal pollution index (HPI). The HPI values were below the critical pollution index value of 100. Metal concentrations were higher in the pre-monsoon season as compared to the post-monsoon season. The Zn, Ni, Mn, As, Se, Al, Ba, Cu, and Cr concentrations did not exceed the desirable limits for drinking water in either season. However, at many sites, concentrations of Fe were above the desirable limit of the WHO (2006) and Indian drinking water standard (BIS 2003) in both seasons. The water that contained higher concentrations of Fe would require treatment before domestic use.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
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    • "For example, the Gombak River in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia is under influence due to population status of the area (Zubaidah et al., 2011). Untreated domestic and industrial wastes have an effect on the water quality of the Nhue River in Hanoi, Vietnam (Kikuchi et al., 2009), the Cuvum and Adyar Rivers in Chennai, India (Gowri and Ramachandran, 2001), the Ibese and Ikopoba Rivers in Nigeria (Awomeso et al., 2009) and the Modjo, Kebena, Akaki, Chacha, Megecha, Wabe, Ghibe, Dabena and Sor Rivers in Ethiopia (Baye, 2006). And according to Negash et al. (2011), the quality of the Beressa river water for irrigation and other domestic uses is under problem because of improper waste disposal and management. "

    Preview · Article · Feb 2015
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    • "Water quality indices are tools, to determine conditions of water quality and, like any other tool, require knowledge about principles and basic concepts of water and related issues (Nikbakht 2004). Several researchers have used water quality indices methods for the assessing quality of waters (Zhang et al. 2009; Kikuchi et al. 2009; Pandey et al. 2009; Giri et al. 2010; Virha et al. 2011; Srivastava et al. 2011; Kumar et al. 2012; Prasanna et al. 2012; Díaz et al. 2013; Giri and Singh 2014; Mahato et al. 2014; Protano et al. 2014; Tiwari et al. 2014; Varghese and Jaya 2014; Panigrahy et al. 2015). However, in recent years much attention has been given towards the evaluation of heavy metal pollution in ground and surface water with the development of a heavy metal pollution index (HPI) (Reddy 1995; Mohan et al. 1996). "

    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Current World Environment
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