Article

Insulin Resistance in Adolescents with Type 2 Diabetes Is Associated with Impaired Exercise Capacity

Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, The Children's Hospital, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA.
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (Impact Factor: 6.21). 08/2009; 94(10):3687-95. DOI: 10.1210/jc.2008-2844
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The incidence of pediatric type 2 diabetes (T2D) is rising, with unclear effects on the cardiovascular system. Cardiopulmonary fitness, a marker of morbidity and mortality, is abnormal in adults with T2D, yet the mechanisms are incompletely understood.
We hypothesized that cardiopulmonary fitness would be reduced in youth with T2D in association with insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular dysfunction.
We conducted a cross-sectional study at an academic hospital that included 14 adolescents (age range, 12-19 yr) with T2D, 13 equally obese adolescents and 12 lean adolescents similar in age, pubertal stage, and activity level.
Cardiopulmonary fitness was measured by peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)peak) and oxygen uptake kinetics (VO(2)kinetics), IR by hyperinsulinemic clamp, cardiac function by echocardiography, vascular function by venous occlusion plethysmography, body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, intramyocellular lipid by magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and inflammation by serum markers.
Adolescents with T2D had significantly decreased VO(2)peak and insulin sensitivity, and increased soleus intramyocellular lipid, C-reactive protein, and IL-6 compared to obese or lean adolescents. Adolescents with T2D also had significantly prolonged VO(2)kinetics, decreased work rate, vascular reactivity, and adiponectin, and increased left ventricular mass and fatty acids compared to lean adolescents. In multivariate linear regression analysis, IR primarily, and fasting free fatty acids and forearm blood flow secondarily, were significant independent predictors of VO(2)peak.
Given the strong relationship between decreased cardiopulmonary fitness and increased mortality, these findings in children are especially concerning and represent early signs of impaired cardiac function.

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    ABSTRACT: Context: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in adults with diabetes, yet little is specifically known about the effects of type 1 diabetes (T1D) on cardiovascular outcomes in youth. Although insulin resistance (IR) likely contributes to exercise and cardiovascular dysfunction in T2D, IR is not typically considered a contributor in T1D. Objective: We hypothesized that cardiopulmonary fitness would be reduced in T1D youth in association with IR and cardiovascular dysfunction. Design and Participants: This cross-sectional study at an academic hospital included 12 T1D adolescents compared with 12 nondiabetic controls, similar in age, pubertal stage, activity level, and body mass index. Outcome Measures: Cardiopulmonary fitness was measured by peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)peak) and oxygen uptake kinetics (VO(2)kinetics), IR by hyperinsulinemic clamp, cardiac function by echocardiography, vascular function by venous occlusion plethysmography, intramyocellular lipid by magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results: T1D adolescents had significantly decreased VO(2)peak, peak work rate, and insulin sensitivity compared with nondiabetic adolescents. T1D youth also had reduced vascular reactivity and evidence of diastolic dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy. Despite their IR and reduced cardiovascular fitness, T1D youth had paradoxically normal intramyocellular lipid, waist to hip ratio, and serum lipids and high adiponectin levels. In multivariate analysis, IR primarily, and forearm blood flow secondarily, independently predicted VO(2)peak. Conclusions: T1D youth demonstrated IR, impaired functional exercise capacity and cardiovascular dysfunction. The phenotype of IR in T1D youth was unique, suggesting a pathophysiology that is different from T2D, yet may adversely affect long-term cardiovascular outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2009 · The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
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