Book

Creativity In Context

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... Our conceptual model is presented in Figure 1 below. negative (Amabile, 1996) while others a positive (Janssen, 2000;Mehta & Zhu, 2016) association between workload and creative behaviors (Baer & Oldham, 2006). Such discrepancy in findings can be partially explained by Person-Environment fit theory (Van Vianen, 2018) which proposes that people have an innate need to fit environments that match their own characteristics. ...
... Training and development and employee creative behavior Amabile (1996) suggested that domain-related skills, creative aptitude, and motivation to work on a particular job are very much essential for creative performance in that domain. Such skills can be attained and developed through training and development initiatives (Tang, Yu, Cooke, & Chen, 2017a, 2017b. ...
... The positive energy that comes from passion for work may also widen the repertoire of cognitive tools available to employees as they undertake daily work activities. Ultimately this may motivate employees with passion for work to actively engage in the application of newly acquired knowledge and skills toward creative behaviors (Hobfoll, 2001) Research has also acknowledged that individual learning requires motivation, and that intrinsic motivation is a raw material for being creative (Amabile, 1996). Employees who are passionate about their work are likely to build linkages between divergent ideas, use more resources, and experiment, therefore activating creativity (Isen, 2003). ...
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How does employees’ work context and job characteristics influence their creative behavior? To explore this question, this study draws on the Job Demands – Job Resources (JD-R) model to examine the role of excessive work overload and training and development on employee creative behaviors. Specifically, we explore whether employees’ work passion mitigates or enhances the effects of work overload and training and development on their creative behavior. Data from 142 employee-supervisor dyads from a Singaporean telecommunications organization showed that work overload positively influenced employee creative behavior. Additionally, employees’ work passion was found to enhance the effects of training and development on their creative behavior. The study contributes to ongoing debates in the literature regarding how specific characteristics of one’s job and targeted HR practices may foster employee creativity.
... This restrictive understanding not only excludes at least one other crucial dimension of any environment, the material one, but it also largely neglects the cultural constitution of any creative environment. While most studies falling under the 'press' category focus on the relation between creator and peers or evaluators (see this tradition exemplified by Amabile's social psychology of creativity; Amabile, 1996), the connection between creativity and culture did not emerge for a long time as a key research topic (for a recent illustration see Glăveanu, Gillespie & Valsiner, 2015). This chapter corrects this oversight by focusing precisely on the multiple intersections between creativity and culture and how both terms have been conceptualised until now. ...
... This is one of the reasons why culture itself has rarely been a concern for creativity researchers and most often they operationalised 'press' factors in a more micro and contained manner. The series of experiments initiated by Teresa Amabile and collaborators (see Amabile, 1996) on the role of surveillance or rewards on creative production illustrate such attempts. However, for as informative as findings about the impact of rewards on intrinsic motivation and performance might be, they are hardly sufficient to re-construct a whole cultural system in which creative work is rewarded in different ways, by different people, and rewards themselves carry various meanings. ...
... This is the main reason why creativity theory did not fully engage with this notion until relatively recently, in the last three decades, and also why, when it did, it created a clear separation between the creative person and his or her cultural environment. The classic way of conceptualising culture is to consider it as 'press', a constraining or enabling factor that can moderate the importance of cognitive or conative variables in creative work (see Amabile's, 1996, componential model of creativity, or Lubart's, 2003. This certainly is a step forward in terms of acknowledging the role of environmental elements in creative work, but it rarely considers the mutual dependency between intra-and inter-psychological factors. ...
... The creativity of design outcomes can be assessed in several ways, including consensual and conceptual measures. Amabile (1996) has included the constructs of novelty and appropriateness (usefulness, correctness, and valuableness) when applied to a product or response. More recent literature in the field of design science suggests a plethora of metrics for evaluating creative outcomes from an ideation task. ...
... The sketch evaluation was conducted with reference to the consensual technique of creativity assessment (Amabile, 1996). This technique is based on the ratings of a group of "expert judges", validated as a reliable and consistent evaluation practice among expert judges (Amabile, 1996;Baer, 2008). ...
... The sketch evaluation was conducted with reference to the consensual technique of creativity assessment (Amabile, 1996). This technique is based on the ratings of a group of "expert judges", validated as a reliable and consistent evaluation practice among expert judges (Amabile, 1996;Baer, 2008). We measured creativity via a framework that follows the Amabile peer evaluation technique (CAT) utilizing a rubric-based system and Likert scale with minimal and generic descriptions. ...
Article
This academic-based investigation is focused on identifying elements that contribute toward the generation of efficient design briefs and their correlation with design outcomes of a sketching exercise. Four conditions are compared: a baseline group, an abstract group, a contextual information group, and a group that was given various example solutions. Via more in-depth surveys, we sought to elicit correlations between the students’ design creativity and stimuli permutations of the different design conditions. Results show that the contextual information groups, which were presented with higher levels of stimulus fidelity, had higher novelty scores, while abstract groups performed well in usefulness. These findings contribute to the formulation of design briefs where the goal is to stimulate the creativity of design outcomes and examine their relationships with student's perceptions of design exercises.
... What causes some producers to struggle to repeat their initial creative production while others go on to continually produce creative works? Some research has examined creativity-the production of something novel and potentially useful (Amabile, 1996;Oldham & Cummings, 1996)-over time. This work has shown that producers often create increasingly incremental work as time goes on (e.g., Audia & Goncalo, 2007;Conti et al., 2014;Mannucci & Yong, 2018;Miron-Spektor et al., 2022). ...
... Second, writing a cookbook is a labor of love (Notaker, 2017). The cookbook market, therefore, mirrors the context of many organizations in which people can make voluntary creative contributions (e.g., Acar, 2019;Deichmann et al., 2021;Deichmann & Van den Ende, 2014;Miron-Spektor et al., 2022) and where intrinsic motivation is a key factor in individuals making these proactive contributions (Amabile, 1996;Unsworth, 2001). ...
... In building our theoretical model, we focus on the factors that are most likely to be of particular salience and relevance to first-time producers of creative work (i.e., those who produce and share or publicize creative work for the first time in the domain in which they are working)-the novelty of the first production (Askin & Mauskapf, 2017;Salganik et al., 2006;Uzzi et al., 2013) as well as whether or not producers receive some form of recognition for their inaugural production. Novelty is a necessary but not a sufficient criterion for creativity-for an idea to be considered creative it also has to have potential utility (Amabile, 1996). Yet, while utility is a desired feature in a creative product (as it is a desired feature in any noncreative product as well), it is novelty that is the essential and distinguishing characteristic of any idea that is labeled "creative" (Baer, 2012). ...
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Sustaining creativity is difficult. We identify the conditions that determine repeat production of novelty among first-time producers, and the psychological mechanism transmitting their effects. Our theoretical model highlights that the novelty of a first production can lower the probability of creating a second production, particularly when the first production is bestowed with an award or recognition. This effect occurs primarily because individuals who win an award for a prior novel production experience a greater threat to their creative identity when anticipating having to produce follow-up novel work. We test our theoretical model in three studies: an archival study of first-time cookbook authors in the United Kingdom and two experiments. Our results provide some support for our theoretical model-award-winning producers of novel cookbooks (or ideas for them) are less likely to follow-up their initial production with a second one, largely because of the potential erosion to a person's creative identity that doing so may cause. Our findings highlight the intricacies of sustaining creativity over time and offer insights into why some producers abandon their creative efforts. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).
... In specifying the team-level control problem, we point at two important team-design choices that help explain a crucial trade-off that is inherent in creative teamwork. First, according to a longstanding view in creativity research, in order to maximize their individual creativity, team members should be granted high autonomy during task completion (Amabile, 1996;Andrews & Farris, 1967;Oldham & Cummings, 1996;Shalley, Zhou, & Oldham, 2004). Second, building on research on team design and team creativity (George, 2007;Gilson & Shalley, 2004;Hackman & Oldham, 1980;Shea & Guzzo, 1987;Stewart, 2006;West, 2002), we argue that team task interdependence is a key driver of creative synergy. ...
... Similarly, Amabile and Gryskiewicz (1987) found in a field study that freedom in carrying out tasks (task autonomy) is the most important facilitator of creativity. The theoretical arguments in favor of a positive relationship between task autonomy and creativity mostly rely on the assumption that when the team leader delegates more decision rights to employees and thus provides them a more autonomous working environment, then this increases intrinsic motivation and the passion for work, which is seen as particularly important for creative work performance (Amabile, 1996;Amabile, Conti, Coon, Lazenby, & Herron, 1996;Liu, Chen, & Yao, 2011;Oldham & Cummings, 1996;Zhou, 1998). Building on the foundational work by Hage and Aiken (1967) and in line with a recent study by Grabner and Speckbacher (2016), we conceptualize autonomy as the degree to which the team leader delegates decision rights to the other team members in daily operations within the assigned job roles. ...
... Conversely, if the team chooses to design teamwork in a highly interdependent way then this undermines the creativity-increasing effects of high delegation of decision rights, since high task interdependence means that team members depend on each other in daily work and this constrains their ability to make use of their decision rights within their assigned tasks, adapt autonomously to changing environments and to make flexible use of their expert knowledge (Janz et al., 1997;Slocum & Sims, 1980). Moreover, high task interdependence within a team undermines the team members' perception to act autonomously which then undermines intrinsic motivation and creativity (Amabile, 1996;Liu et al., 2011;Oldham & Cummings, 1996;Zhou, 1998). ...
Article
In the creative industries, creative output is often produced in temporary project teams, staffed with employees from within the organization. In this study we make two main contributions regarding the management of creative performance in such teams. First, we provide evidence for a fundamental trade-off inherent in creative teamwork. Team creativity benefits both from high team member autonomy and high task interdependence, but when team leaders give higher autonomy to team members then this undermines the positive effect of a more interdependent design of teamwork on team creativity, and vice versa. Second, we argue that cultural control at the organizational level is an effective means to resolve this team-level trade-off and to enable teams to leverage both high autonomy and high task interdependence for higher team creativity. We test our hypotheses using survey data collected at three different organizational levels (team members, team leaders, and agency heads) from 372 individuals of 101 temporary project teams within 53 advertising agencies, and find evidence consistent with our predictions.
... Within a variety of themes and approaches, research on creativity does not focus on a single homogeneous definition. For some authors, creativity refers to the creation of ideas to be judged in a sociocultural environment according to their usefulness and originality (Amabile, 1996;George, 2007). For other research, creativity involves the interaction between motivation, intentions, and the ability to transform received sensory information into original interpretations in a given context (Csikszentmihalyi, 1997). ...
... Research that, until then, focused on personality traits of creative individuals started to relate creative learning to the construction of meaning, as it is formed by the interconnection of different individual practices, and, therefore, a cognitive and social activity (Amabile, 1996;Choi et al. al., 2020;Maitlis, Vogus, & Lawrence, 2013;Stierand, 2015). Thus, knowledge and the construction of meaning are interactive processes of learning in action between recognized norms, values, and practices on the one hand, and new knowledge and creative ideas on the FGV EAESP | RAE | São Paulo | V. 62 (3) | 2022 | 1-20 | e2020-0891 eISSN 2178-938X other (Gherardi & Perrotta, 2013;Maitlis et al., 2013;Yanow, 2001). ...
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RESUMO A criatividade é precursora de inovação nas organizações, economias e sociedades contemporâneas. Entretanto, é necessário o conhecimento integrado e atualizado sobre a produção acadêmica, devido à dispersão de enfoques existentes e ao desengajamento com a epistemologia da prática. O objetivo desta pesquisa consiste em mapear e integrar a produção acadêmica sobre criatividade organizacional, propondo sua renovação conceitual com base na epistemologia da prática. O método é baseado em levantamento e análise da produção acadêmica nacional e internacional sobre criatividade organizacional e epistemologia da prática. Os resultados consistem em um conjunto de categorias de concepções da criatividade que permite integrar as pesquisas em Administração e uma proposta estruturada de renovação conceitual a partir da epistemologia da prática. Os resultados contribuem para o avanço da pesquisa em criatividade com a elaboração de um conjunto integrado de concepções sobre a criatividade organizacional e a articulação da criatividade com a perspectiva da prática, ampliando a compreensão do conceito e propondo um caminho conceitual-teórico para renovar e alimentar pesquisas futuras.
... Scholars have usually treated creativity as a precursor to innovation, defining creativity as the generation of novel and useful ideas and innovation as the successful implementation of creative ideas (Anderson, Potočnik, and Zhou, 2014). Past research on creativity has tended to construe creative projects as their own separate endeavors, focusing on what contributes to the creativity of the final product in a given project (Amabile, 1988(Amabile, , 1996Staw, 1990;West, 2002;Perry-Smith and Mannucci, 2017). The assumption is that once the final product is implemented in the market, creators move on to their next project, and the process starts anew. ...
... Whereas creators who build novel portfolios before initial success may be better positioned to expand their repertoires to incorporate new trends, creators who build varied portfolios before initial success may be better positioned to keep up with new trends using their existing repertoires. By building more-varied portfolios prior to initial success, creators should develop morediverse repertoires (Amabile, 1996;Bartel and Garud, 2009;Conti, Gambardella, and Mariani, 2014;Mannucci and Yong, 2018). As new trends emerge, creators with more-diverse repertoires should have more options for generating new products that keep up with the latest trends, without substantially expanding their existing capabilities (Ashby, 1956;Weick, 1976;Cohen and Levinthal, 1990;Baker and Nelson, 2005;Harrison and Klein, 2007). ...
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Creative industries produce many one-hit wonders who struggle to repeat their initial success and fewer hit makers who sustain success over time. To develop theory on the role of creativity in driving sustained market success, I propose a path dependence theory of creators’ careers that considers creators’ whole portfolios of products over time and how their early portfolios shape their later capacity to sustain success. The main idea is that a creator’s path to sustained success depends on the creativity in their portfolio at the time of their initial hit—relatively creative portfolios give creators more options for leveraging their past portfolios while adapting to market changes, increasing their odds of additional hits. I tested the proposed theory using an archival study of the U.S. music industry from 1959–2010, including data on over 3 million songs by 69,050 artists, and the results largely support the hypotheses. Artists who reached their initial hits with relatively creative (novel or varied) portfolios were more likely to generate additional hits, but a novel portfolio was less likely to yield an initial hit than was a typical portfolio. These findings suggest that new creators face a tradeoff between their likelihood of initial versus sustained success, such that building a relatively creative early portfolio is a risky bet that can make or break a creator’s career.
... Stein (1975) argued that the expansion of creativity research to the process between self and others, and self and the environment allows a holistic and systematic investigation of creativity. This has given rise to the emergence of contemporary theories such as the System theory (Csikszentmihalyi, 1988) and componential model of creativity (Amabile, 1996). These theories emphasise the emergent nature of creativity as a result of the interactions between the creator, the creator's disciplinary field, and the social organisation where the creator is in. ...
... If creativity is nurtured through standalone creativity enhancement programmes, the assessment could focus on appraising whether the participants show improvement in their creative performance in terms of their cognitive skills and attitude as well as beliefs about creativity. These assessments could include evaluation of self-beliefs or selfefficacy (e.g., , divergent thinking tests (e.g., Guilford, 1968) and the assessment of actual creative products or solutions judged by a panel of experts i.e., CAT (e.g., Amabile, 1996), or a set of pre-determined criteria including novelty and usefulness (Cropley et al., 2011). ...
Article
Creativity has been recognised as one of the most important skills in the 21st century. Although creativity has been advocated in the context of education, there still seems to be a lack of understanding of the concept of creativity, leading to teaching and learning practices that still encourage uniformity and conformity. The current literature on creativity is insufficient for understanding creativity from a more comprehensive manner, as frameworks and taxonomies for creativity largely focus on either listing a set of components relevant to creativity without explaining strategies that invoke creativity or categorising creative strategies without explaining the factors that support the use of these strategies, and the result of applying these strategies. More importantly, these frameworks are largely theoretical without empirical evidence. While there have been studies that investigate approaches for developing creativity, the effectiveness of these approaches is measured based on the improvement demonstrated through the creative outputs produced by the participants, by mainly looking at the number of solutions being produced and the originality of the solutions. They do not examine the use of strategies in the creative processes. As such, the understanding of how creativity can be supported by the use of set of strategies remains insufficient. In view of these situations, this study aimed to develop a taxonomic framework that could facilitate the understanding and development of creativity, which could serve as a foundation for teaching, learning and assessment. This study viewed creativity from the problem-solving perspective, where problems act as a catalyst for creative thinking. The sample for this study was lecturers and students across various disciplines from an international university in Malaysia. This study aimed at (i) developing a prototype taxonomic framework for creativity through a synthesis of literature on theories, frameworks and research on creativity, (ii) exploring and understanding the meaning of creativity from the higher education lecturers and students’ perspectives, (iii) examining the creativity features and usability of the taxonomic framework based on the perceptions of creativity and the relevance of the framework among a group of higher education lecturers and students, and (iv) examining the use of the creative strategies in the prototype taxonomic framework for creativity through a problem-solving task. The methodology for this study involved a mixed-methods, multiphase design. This study comprised four phases i.e., (i) a systematic synthesis of the literature on creativity through a thematic analysis to develop a prototype taxonomic framework for creativity, (ii) data collection from general higher education lecturers and students through a survey, (iii) data collection from the participant-nominated creative students and lecturers through a series of interviews, and (iv) data collection from higher education students through a problem-solving task. Findings revealed that the prototype taxonomic framework for creativity consisted of 24 features of creativity. Findings gained from the survey and interviews showed that creativity was generally perceived as an ability related to the mental processes and the ability to produce something that has a value – usually innovativeness and originality. Additionally, the taxonomic framework was generally perceived to be relevant for teaching, learning and assessment. Findings from the problem-solving task revealed that the taxonomic framework was able to facilitate creativity, by allowing students to use a wider range of strategies, produce more solutions, provide greater detail to their solutions and generate solutions that are novel, useful and ethical. In general, the overall findings from the study have demonstrated that creativity is a skill that can be taught and learned. The implications of the study offered several contributions of the framework for educational purposes.
... Comprehensive reviews of the creativity literature suggest that intrinsic motivation as an internal process that leads to employee creativity has garnered the most significant attention from organizational scholars (e.g., George, 2008;Shalley et al., 2004). In particular, a number of conceptual and empirical studies have generated evidence for intrinsic motivation as a pivotal psychological mechanism that underlies creativity (e.g., Amabile, 1996;Grant & Berry, 2011). Shalley and colleagues pointed out that "each contextual characteristic affects creativity via its effects on employees' 'intrin-sic motivation' to perform a work assignment" (2004: 935). ...
... Control variables. Following prior attribution, creativity, leadership and abusive supervision research (e.g., Amabile, 1996;Erdogan & Liden, 2002;Martinko et al., 2007a;Tepper, 2007), we included control variables at three levels to rule out explanations representing alternatives to our model. At the individual level (level 1), we controlled for team member's age, gender, education, length of relationship with team leader, and objective task performance. ...
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Organizations are constantly searching for new pathways to ensure survival and sustainability in a highly dynamic and competitive environment. Against this background, the present study aims to propose a strategic framework considering the crucial role of small businesses and entrepreneurship for sustainable economic, social, and environmental development. This paper employed a selective-intensive literature review technique to review and evaluate extant sustainability orientation (SO) literature from multiple strategic orientation paradigm. In addition, drawing from the theoretical underpinnings of resource complementarity and configuration perspective, this study proposes a configuration of sustainability orientation (SO), entrepreneurial orientation (EO), and market orientation (MO) in the era of sustainable development. The key finding of this paper is the development of a higher-order dynamic capability, that is, Entrepreneurial Responsible Orientation (ERO). ERO is proposed as an entrepreneurial strategic framework that integrates three distinct but complementary elements (i.e., sustainability, entrepreneurial, and marketing) under the umbrella of strategic orientation that drives superior sustainable firm performance. Moreover, we put forward the future research agenda by developing several potential research questions, thus, the findings of this study will serve as a springboard to extend the knowledge base in this field of research. This paper provides an integrated framework in the contexts of small businesses and entrepreneurship by utilizing the combination of the theoretical and conceptual development approaches. The proposed framework, if implemented successfully, has the potential to drive sustainable performance of the small firms particularly, and sustainable development of the country, generally.
... Within a variety of themes and approaches, research on creativity does not focus on a single homogeneous definition. For some authors, creativity refers to the creation of ideas to be judged in a sociocultural environment according to their usefulness and originality (Amabile, 1996;George, 2007). For other research, creativity involves the interaction between motivation, intentions, and the ability to transform received sensory information into original interpretations in a given context (Csikszentmihalyi, 1997). ...
... Research that, until then, focused on personality traits of creative individuals started to relate creative learning to the construction of meaning, as it is formed by the interconnection of different individual practices, and, therefore, a cognitive and social activity (Amabile, 1996;Choi et al. al., 2020;Maitlis, Vogus, & Lawrence, 2013;Stierand, 2015). Thus, knowledge and the construction of meaning are interactive processes of learning in action between recognized norms, values, and practices on the one hand, and new knowledge and creative ideas on the FGV EAESP | RAE | São Paulo | V. 62 (3) | 2022 | 1-20 | e2020-0891 eISSN 2178-938X other (Gherardi & Perrotta, 2013;Maitlis et al., 2013;Yanow, 2001). ...
Article
Full-text available
Creativity is a precursor to innovation in contemporary organizations, economies and societies. However, we still lack an integrated and updated knowledge about academic production on creativity, due to the dispersion of existing approaches and the deviation with the epistemology of practice. The research goal is to map and integrate the academic production on organizational creativity, proposing their conceptual renewal from the epistemology of practice. The research method is based on survey and analysis of national and international academic productions on organizational creativity and epistemology of practice. The results consist in a set of categories of the creativity conceptions that allows an integration of research on management research and a structured proposal for renewing the conceptualization of creativity from the epistemology of practice. The results contribute to the advancement of creativity research in elaboration of an integrated set of conceptions of organizational creativity and articulation of creativity with the perspective of practice, expanding the understanding of the concept and proposing a conceptual and theoretical path for renewing and feeding future research. A criatividade é precursora de inovação nas organizações, economias e sociedades contemporâneas. Entretanto, é necessário o conhecimento integrado e atualizado sobre a produção acadêmica, devido à dispersão de enfoques existentes e ao desengajamento com a epistemologia da prática. O objetivo desta pesquisa consiste em mapear e integrar a produção acadêmica sobre criatividade organizacional, propondo sua renovação conceitual com base na epistemologia da prática. O método é baseado em levantamento e análise da produção acadêmica nacional e internacional sobre criatividade organizacional e epistemologia da prática. Os resultados consistem em um conjunto de categorias de concepções da criatividade que permite integrar as pesquisas em Administração e uma proposta estruturada de renovação conceitual a partir da epistemologia da prática. Os resultados contribuem para o avanço da pesquisa em criatividade com a elaboração de um conjunto integrado de concepções sobre a criatividade organizacional e a articulação da criatividade com a perspectiva da prática, ampliando a compreensão do conceito e propondo um caminho conceitual-teórico para renovar e alimentar pesquisas futuras. Palavras-chave: criatividade, prática, epistemologia da prática, administração, estudos organizacionais. RESUMEN La creatividad es precursora de innovación en las organizaciones, economías y sociedades contemporáneas. Pero aún necesitamos un conocimiento integrado y actualizado sobre la producción académica, debido a la dispersión de los enfoques existentes y la desvinculación con la epistemología de la práctica. El objetivo de esta investigación es mapear e integrar la producción académica sobre creatividad organizacional, proponiendo su renovación conceptual desde la epistemología de la práctica. El método de investigación se basa en el relevamiento y análisis de la producción académica nacional e internacional sobre creatividad organizacional y epistemología de la práctica. Los resultados consisten en un conjunto de categorías de las concepciones de la creatividad que permite la integración de la investigación en la Administración y una propuesta estructurada de renovación conceptual desde la epistemología de la práctica. Los resultados contribuyen al avance de la investigación mediante la elaboración de un conjunto integrado de concepciones de la creatividad organizacional y articulación de la creatividad con la perspectiva de la práctica, lo que amplía la comprensión del concepto y propone un camino teórico-conceptual para renovar y alimentar futuras investigaciones. Palabras clave: creatividad; práctica; epistemología de la práctica; administración, estudios organizacionales. ARTICLES | Creativity as practice: perspectives and challenges for research on management Pérola Cavalcante Dourado | Eduardo Paes Barreto Davel 2 FGV EAESP | RAE | São Paulo | V. 62 (3) | 2022 | 1-20 | e2020-0891 eISSN 2178-938X
... The relationship between flexibility and motivation emerged as another significant subtheme according to the analysis. Existing research suggests that flexibility correlates with student motivation (Ferrer-Caja & Weiss, 2000), conversely, a rigid and controlling learning environment cause students to lose initiative and can deteriorate learning efficacy (Amabile, 1996;Utman, 1997). Luskin and Hirsen's (2010) research associated students' perception of control with increased feelings of satisfaction, enjoyment, and confidence. ...
Article
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Design education has traditionally been deemed a face-to-face endeavor causing online learning to be disregarded as a viable teaching option. Nonetheless, the recent impact of COVID-19 pressured design schools to rapidly migrate online, impelling many educators to utilize this unfamiliar and largely dismissed methodology. The impending problems exposed with this sudden shift point to a significant gap in research. Accordingly, this study proposes a set of guidelines targeting design knowledge-building, based on an in-depth look at student experience during an online design course. Data were collected through a 63-item course efficiency survey (n = 59) and a series of semi-structured focus group interviews (n = 16) with the enrolled students. The following overarching themes emerged through iterative thematic analysis of the interview data: (1) flexibility and handling stress, (2) managing self-pacing issues (3) formal conversation platform, (4) content variety and access options. The themes were interpreted in relation to the survey findings and the broader research on learning. The proposed guidelines emphasize initially clear goals and objectives, pacing flexibility with progress guidance, content and communication variety, sense of presence and peer exposure, and individualized feedback. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful in building, conducting, and evaluating future online design knowledge-building experiences.
... Eine mögliche Erklärung hierfür kann in der Problematik der Erfassbarkeit und Mehrdimensionalität von Kreativität liegen, auf die auch Urban (2004) hinweist. Neugierverhalten, Fokussierung und Mitschriften beziehen sich jedoch auf Motivation, die nach Amabile (1996) eine grundlegende Komponente von Kreativität darstellt. Deshalb ist davon auszugehen, dass diese positiven Ergebnisse vermittelnde Effekte auf die Entwicklung der Kreativität hatten. ...
Book
Der Band präsentiert grundlegende Arbeiten sowie konkrete Anwendungsbeispiele für das Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Im ersten Teil wird das Konzept vorgestellt und aus verschiedenen Perspektiven diskutiert. Im zweiten Teil werden Arbeiten von Hochschullehrenden präsentiert, die ihre Lehre im Rahmen eines SoTL-Projekts untersucht haben. Im dritten Teil werden Studien aus der Praxis der hochschuldidaktischen Weiterbildung vorgestellt, die Wege aufzeigen, wie SoTL als Konzept zur Lehrentwicklung an Hochschulen implementiert werden kann. Darüber hinaus sind Studien enthalten, in denen die Hochschuldidaktik selbst aus der Perspektive des SoTL untersucht wird.
... En effet, on trouve les deux concepts traités séparément mais également fréquemment confondus, ce qui a créé une certaine ambiguïté dans la littérature scientifique plus récente. Une large partie de chercheurs sont d'accord et considèrent la créativité comme étant une phase de l'innovation -la phase de génération des idées -alors que l'innovation quant à elle, correspond à la phase suivante qui est la mise en oeuvre des idées -le côté application - (Amabile, 1996 ;Anderson, Zhou & Potocnik, 2014 ;Oldham & Cumming, 1996 ;Potocnik & Anderson, 2016 ;West & Farr, 1990). ...
Thesis
Cette thèse a pour objectif de présenter une recherche concernant le comportement d’innovation d’un échantillon d’hygiénistes opérant dans des services d’hygiène hospitalière en France. La recherche vise à comprendre le rôle de certains facteurs susceptibles d’être des leviers (ressources individuelles et organisationnelles) et/ou des freins (individuels et organisationnels) à l’innovation des pratiques professionnelles des services d’hygiène hospitalière. Dans un premier temps, il a été fait une revue des travaux sur le comportement d’innovation organisationnelle, la satisfaction au travail, les caractéristiques du travail motivationnel et les comportements proactifs, en particulier la prise en charge. Deux études ont été réalisées pour le recueil des données : une étude qualitative menée auprès des hygiénistes de quatre Hôpitaux de la Nouvelle Aquitaine, et une étude transversale à partir d’un questionnaire auto-rapporté, envoyé à tous les hygiénistes de la France - Métropolitaine et dans les territoires d’Outre-Mer – adhérents à la Société Française d’Hygiène Hospitalière (SF2H), et ce, en un seul temps de mesure. Pour l’étude quantitative, des échelles de mesure traduites en français ont été utilisées, en l’occurrence pour les caractéristiques du travail, le comportement d’innovation. Pour les besoins de l’étude, d’autres échelles de mesure ont également été créées pour mesurer les contraintes liées au travail, les opportunités liées au travail et les échanges entre les services de soins et les services de d’hygiène.Pour tester les hypothèses de médiation, des modèles d’équations structurelles (SEM) ont été utilisés, ainsi que la Macros Process de Hayes pour tester les hypothèses de modération et de médiation modérée. Ces résultats mettent en évidence les leviers dont disposent les hygiénistes pour innover dans leurs pratiques professionnelles ; à savoir que : (1) la variété au travail et l’interdépendance au travail ont une relation positive avec le comportement d’innovation, à travers le comportement proactif de prise en charge, (2) l’autonomie a une relation directe et positive d’une part avec le comportement d’innovation, et d’autre part une relation positive avec le comportement d’innovation, à travers le comportement proactif de prise en charge. En outre, le comportement proactif de prise en charge a une relation positive avec le comportement d’innovation.De plus, ces résultats permettent également d’identifier que les échanges entre les cadres de santé et les hygiénistes sont un levier organisationnel au comportement d’innovation dans leurs pratiques professionnelles, et les contraintes liées au travail sont quant à eux des défis organisationnels à relever. Ces deux facteurs organisationnels contribuent à accélérer le comportement proactif de prise en charge et renforcent davantage le comportement d’innovation.
... Team behavioral integration, in which the whole team shares information, resources, and decisions (Hambrick, 1997), is conducive to team creativity for several reasons. First, behaviorally integrated teams are likely to have a broad scope of information and perspectives that provide a cognitive base for members to generate novel and useful ideas (Amabile, 1996;Leung and Wang, 2015;Hu et al., 2018). Additionally, team behavioral integration fosters member commitment to collective goals and mutual collaboration to resolve team problems (Carmeli et al., 2011). ...
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This study developed and tested a research model to examine the influence of leader humility on team creativity. Drawing on social learning theory, we tested team behavioral integration as a mediator in the relationship between leader humility and team creativity. Moreover, we tested the moderating effect of leader performance on this mediated relationship. We tested our hypotheses using a multiple-source research design. Data were collected from 275 employees in 67 work teams from a variety of industrial companies in Southeast China. The results confirmed that team behavioral integration mediated the relationship between leader humility and team creativity. Furthermore, the indirect effect of leader humility on team creativity via team behavioral integration was stronger when leader performance was higher (vs. lower). We discuss the implications of our findings for the theory and practice of leader humility.
... Trust increases the likelihood of knowledge and ideas being shared (Coleman, 1990). When team members collaborate well, creativity increases (Amabile, 1996). Both incremental and RI outputs are influenced by SC (Berraies, 2019). ...
Article
This study investigates the impact of High-Performance Work Systems (HPWS) on radical and incremental innovation in the services industry. Insights from the Social Exchange Theory (SET) and Ability-Motivation-Opportunity (AMO) Framework have been used to assess the role of social capital (SC) as a mediator between HPWS, radical innovation (RI), and incremental innovation (II). By using a simple random sampling technique, 328 responses were received from respondents in Pakistan’s banking sector firms. For data analysis, structural equation modeling was applied. The results of the study show that HPWS is a significant driver of II, but not RI, in banking sector firms. Moreover, SC plays the role of mediator in the HPWS-innovation link. Outcomes of the study extend the understanding of the “black-box” (i.e., the transmission mechanism between systems of HR practices and innovation). It also contributes to understanding HPWS, SC, II, and RI in the context of Pakistan’s banking sector. This study expands on earlier research in the areas of HPWS, SC, and Innovation. It supports the view that internal SC enables RI and II. Prior studies indicated that HPWS drives innovations, yet there has been no clear explanation about the mechanism of this effect. By providing empirical evidence on the mediating role of SC, this study expands on existing literature. Empirical validation of an association between HPWS RI, and II contributes to theory by supporting the tenets of the AMO Framework. Unlike prior research that focused on short-term financial outcomes, this study used RI and II as alternate indicators of organizational performance. Our study expanded the literature into the services sector. Furthermore, we contributed to the methodology by conceptualizing HPWS as a high-order formative construct, resulting in significant model parsimony. Insights from our study are relevant to managers because it shows that HPWS implementation not only helps banks to attract, develop, and retain talent but also facilitates the development of SC, which is critical for enabling the innovation capability of the firm. Top managers need to consider internal SC in the design of HPWS because carefully designed HPWS drives SC. This enables idiosyncratic relationships among members of the organization. Thus, the firm gets a competitive advantage that is harder to be copied by competitors. First, data were collected from a single industry. It will be useful to know the effects of multiple industries in future research. Second, this study did not differentiate between different dimensions of SC, i.e., structural, cognitive, and relational. It will be interesting to see how these dimensions relate to HPWS and innovation in future research.
... Studies in educational settings have shown that teachers who are autonomy supportive (as opposed to controlling) promote greater intrinsic motivation, curiosity, and desire for challenge in their students (Deci, Nezlek, & Sheinman, 1981;Flink, Boggiano, & Barrett, 1990;Ryan & Grolnick, 1986). In contrast, students taught with a more controlling approach lose initiative and learn less effectively, especially when learning requires conceptual and/or creative processing (Amabile, 1996;Grolnick & Ryan, 1987;Utman, 1997). Finally, the third psychological need proposed, relatedness, also has a role to play in supporting intrinsic motivation. ...
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Abstract Occupational therapists face challenges of practice development when working in emerging settings. This study provides an understanding of the process of developing practice in Irish mainstream post primary schools with adolescents with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD). This is a collaboration between the National Behaviour Support Service, Department of Education and Skills and the Discipline of Occupational Therapy, Trinity College Dublin. A school-based self-regulation programme called ‘Movement Matters’ is the focus. Methods An embedded mixed method design was applied to three objectives. The first was to describe and critique the context of occupational therapy practice that led to the development of the Movement Matters Programme (qualitative). A matrix analysis was applied to 12 documentation sources such as peer reviewed journals; NBSS web based information; course manuals; and teacher training courses to critique if and how the programme reflected core occupational therapy theory and values as stated in the vision for the service (MacCobb 2012). The second was to analyse student attitudinal and behavioural measures pre and post participation in the Programme (quantitative). The ‘Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire’ (SDQ) and ‘Pupil Attitude to Self and School’ (PASS) provide triangulated data from the student, parent and teacher collected for 39 targeted students. The third was to map the clinical reasoning process of the occupational therapists who developed and observed the programme in use (qualitative). This is achieved by analysing qualitative data delivered through three semi structured group interviews with two occupational therapists who developed the programme over the course of a twelve-month period of its national piloting. Main Findings The mixed method approach was successful in achieving the research objectives. All the key principals of occupational therapy practice described by MacCobb (2012) are evident in the critique. The PASS and SDQ data created a profile that provides insight into how 39 students from an underserved population (SEBD) experience school. This profile differs from a UK national study norms in most areas, particularly around self-efficacy, self-determination, and motivation as learners. Occupational therapists’ clinical reasoning suggests that the Movement Matters Programme was effective as a self-regulation programme for targeted students. The co-occupation activities of the programme created a social environment which promoted the development of collaborative relationships between teachers and students, acknowledged as central to effective interventions with students with SEBD. Important learning about practice development emerged and recommendations for the profession are provided. The most relevant finding to emerge from this study was that a new interdisciplinary scholarship of practice approach (Fitzgerald and MacCobb, 2017) generated new knowledge in this emerging area.
... Moreover, through delegation of authority and fostering of autonomy (Bass, 1985), the transformational leadership style not only facilitates better skill acquisition and mastery development (Adil et al., 2020;Afsar & Masood, 2018;Cai et al., 2021;Han & Bai, 2020), but higher follower creativity (Gong et al., 2009;Mielniczuk & Laguna, 2020;Mittal & Dhar, 2015). Due to their tendency to generate novel solutions to tasks at hand (Amabile, 1983(Amabile, , 1996(Amabile, , 1988, creative employees have a high drive for tackling organisational challenges (Bandura, 1986;Royston & Reiter-Palmon, 2019), and in a lean and efficient manner (Gong et al., 2009) that meet customers' products and service needs (Zhou, 1998;Zhou & Shalley, 2003, 2008. Therefore, they are highly rated by their supervisors (Oldham & Cummings, 1996). ...
Article
The current paper is one of the rare studies to specifically focus on the contextual conditions under which the learning-related actions of transformational supervisors' help retailing supermarkets' store managers to learn and engage in behaviours that produce creative outcomes. We use a qualitative research approach with the data based on in-depth semi structured interviews with 40 retailing supermarkets' store managers in Nigeria, South Africa and the UK. Our findings show that transformational supervision significantly boosts store managers' creativity, facilitated by fostering store managers' learning orientation, creative role identity (CRI) and creative self-efficacy (CSE), in all three contexts. From our findings, we have developed a model that symbolise the role of transformational supervisors in fostering store managers' creativity, which provides a baseline for supermarkets in (re)evaluating the significance of their leadership styles on follower creativity.
... It has been argued that creativity can foster learners' original thinking, increase their engagement in the learning process, and boost their motivation (Kaufman, 2016;Kaufman & Sternberg, 2010); it has also been identified as an important component of problem-solving and cognitive skills (Plucker et al., 2004). The incorporation of creativity into curricula is an increasingly popular topic in the field of education (e.g., Amabile, 1996;Craft, 2011) as well as in various other fields (Bloom & Dole, 2018;Csikszentmihalyi & Wolfe, 2014). Creative pedagogy refers to teaching that enhances creative development via three interrelated elements: creative teaching, teaching for creativity, and creative learning (Lin, 2011). ...
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The movement from STEM to STEAM, with its emphasis on real-world applications, promises to meet the changing needs of a globally connected world. However, the potential of transdisciplinarity to inspire and deepen our understanding of who we are and how we make sense of a world in turmoil remains undertheorized. This article makes a case for repositioning STEAM education as democratized enactments of transdisciplinary education, where arts and sciences are not separate or even separable endeavors. Drawing upon posthumanist theorizing, three projects will exemplify transdisciplinarity across music, mathematics, and science education. Transgressing and transcending disciplinary boundaries, and attending to both human and nonhuman perspectives, we invite a rethink of the work of schools, going beyond democratizing creativity to fully enact posthumanist transdisciplinarity.
... The starting point in teaching positive creativity is scaffolding motivation that benefits others. Much research on motivation for creativity has focused on the locus of motivationwhether motivation is intrinsic or extrinsic [20]. Forgeard and Mecklenburg [21], in their two-dimensional model of creative motivation, also considered the intended beneficiaries of creative work, distinguishing self-oriented and other-oriented motivation. ...
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Guided by research in creativity studies, moral development, and positive youth development, this paper proposes four principles to guide education toward positive creativity: (1) building prosocial motivation, (2) building emotion skills to build persistence, (3) building an understanding of creativity as dynamic, and (4) building self-concept of positive creativity. To illustrate applying these theoretically derived principles to teaching positive creativity, we provide examples from the inspirED program for secondary school students, which aims to build a more positive social and emotional climate through student-led creative projects. The four phases of the inspirED program—Assess the problems, Brainstorm ideas, Complete a project, and Debrief the project’s impact—are mapped onto the four principles of teaching for positive creativity.
... In other words, the specifications of usefulness are dictated by the task. Indeed, experts display high interrater reliability when it comes to judging the creativity of outcomes in their respective fields of expertise (Amabile, 1996). The exceptions are instances of transformative, historic creativity that are so radical that their value may not be appreciated by the creators' contemporaries and can take longer to be recognized. ...
... Carr and Johansson (1995) describe innovation as the transformation of ideas and alternatives into useful applications that lead to change and improvement. Amabile (1996) defines innovation as the successful implementation of creative ideas within an organisation. Sawhney, Wolcott and Arroniz (2006) define business innovation as the creation of substantial new value for customers and company by creatively changing one or more dimensions of the business systems. ...
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The overall intent of this research study is to investigate the relative effect of SIMPLEX and Akinboye Practical Creativity at Work (APCAW) strategies on the business innovation competence of selected managers in Information Technology and Service industry in Lagos. The study adopted a pre-test, post-test, control group, experimental design with a 3x3x2 factorial matrix. The participants consisted of 126 managers drawn from three ITS companies in Lagos, Lagos state. The participants were categorised according to their levels of emotional intelligence based on their score on the Shutte emotional intelligence scale. Thereafter, the experimental and control groups were exposed to six weeks of Simplex (foreign) and Apcaw (indigenous) and placebo training respectively. The dependent variable was business innovation competence. This was measured using the business innovation assessment scale (BIAS). One hypothesis was tested and the data was analysed using Analysis of Co-variance (ANCOVA), pair wise comparison. Findings from the study revealed that treated participants' were significantly superior to control on business innovation competence (F(2,107)=12.304;p<0.00). Conclusively, SIMPLEX and APCAW techniques were found to be effective in fostering business innovation competence of managers. It was therefore recommended that management should employ the use of these techniques to enhance employee business innovation competence on the job. In addition, employers of labour are strongly encouraged to incorporate creativity and innovation training in their personnel programme, such as, in the induction, recruitment, selection and promotion of staff to managerial cadre. .
... Yet, these studies focused solely on creativity, which is known to be affected by regulatory focus -a large body of research showing an advantage of promotion over prevention in creativity tasks (without considering closure; e.g., Friedman & Förster, 2001, 2005Sacramento et al., 2013;Wu et al., 2008). Authors suggest that promotion focus is associated with a cognitive flexibility and divergent thinking, which are determinant of success in creativity tasks (see Amabile, 1996;De Dreu et al., 2008). As a consequence, different rates of success observed after promotion closure versus prevention closure in creativity tasks could be due at least partly to qualitatively different cognitive processing of these tasks (such as cognitive flexibility and divergent thinking). ...
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Past research has found that regulatory closure, that is, successful goal striving regulated either under a promotion or prevention focus, has important consequences in terms of motivational activation and mobilisation of cognitive resources in subsequent tasks, but it mostly investigated motivation in the same or similar tasks to the one for which closure was achieved. Drawing from an energisation-deactivation hypothesis, we investigated the effect of closure on performance and persistence in unrelated subsequent cognitive tasks. Across four studies, we found that promotion closure had an energising effect leading to: quicker decision times in lexical tasks (Studies 1-2), increased persistence and greater originality (Study 3), and greater visuospatial memory performance (Study 4). In contrast, prevention closure had a deactivating effect leading to reduced performance and persistence. No systematic differences arose in situations of non-closure. We discuss results and implications with respect to both regulatory closure and regulatory fit theoretical approaches.
... Such a mindset can further encourage employees to explore what new individual skills and abilities are required to bring about improvements and changes in their workplace. (Amabile 1996;Hirst et al. 2009). Therefore, we propose the following hypothesis: ...
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Adopting an interactionist perspective and drawing on the proactive-motivation model, this study examines whether rolebreadth self-efficacy mediates the relationship between employees learning goal orientation and taking charge. Additionally, we examine whether the proposed mediation is strengthened underconditions of high co-worker support. Empirical data was drawn from 193 full-time employees across five service sector organizations in Malaysia. Process Macro was used to test our proposed hypothesis and the moderated-mediation model. The paper found rolebreadth self-efficacy to fully mediate the relationship between employees learning goal orientation and taking charge. Contrary to expectations, co-worker support was found not to moderate the relationship between learning goal orientation and rolebreadth self-efficacy, nor was the moderated-mediation relationship was stronger under conditions of high co-worker support. This study builds a contingent model that extends the effect of learning goal orientation on taking charge and thereby the nomological network of both learning goal orientation and taking charge literatures. Additionally, this study enriches our understanding on how learning goal orientation leads to taking charge behavior by exploring whether a contextual factor, co-worker support, moderates our proposed mediating model. Doing so, we extend the existing proactive motivation model.
... Following Amabile's advice, the judges were not "preselected on any dimension other than their familiarity with the domain" (1996: 42). 4 For the second dimension, we chose the label "mastery of convention" rather than the more commonly used label of "usefulness"(Amabile, 1996) because the notion of usefulness is misleading in the context of creative music. Music is not more or less useful; it is more or less technically sophisticated in the sense of displaying a mastery of musical conventions(Becker, 1982;Godart, Seong, & Phillips, 2020). ...
... In a performance context, where the TMS is considered relevant, the innovative work behavior tends to be consistently involved in problem-seeking and problem-solving activities such as searching for unique and effective ideas. Therefore, we predict that in a team-based situation, TMSs replicate two dimensions of Amabile (1996) model, which eventually impact salespeople's innovative work behavior. When employees work in a fully advanced TMSs environment, the team communicates valuable information about the actual findings of work-related activities, allowing them to demonstrate a high degree of meaningful engagement and establish new work patterns. ...
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In today’s complex selling environment, it is challenging for sales leaders to enhance the effectiveness of their sales teams. The aim of this study is to observe the impact of authentic leadership on salespersons’ internal and external behaviors under B2B selling context [i.e., transactive memory system (TMS), innovative work behavior, and customer-directed OCB] and their consequences in team selling performance. Respondents of our survey included salespersons and managers working in the sales departments of pharmaceutical companies. By using structural equation modeling, the dyad responses from 348 matched salespeople–managers were analyzed. The findings disclose that authentic leadership behavior has a stronger relationship with the TMS, innovative work behavior, and customer-directed OCB. Our results also indicate that innovative work behavior and customer-directed OCB are potentially mediated between authentic leadership and team selling performance relationship. The theoretical implication of these results for managerial practice is also discussed.
... There is international evidence of this kind of practice within D&T education and other subjects stretching over a period of time (Nicholl & Spendlove, 2016;Renzulli et al., 2003;Stables, 2017;Williams, 2017). Commentators suggest however that creativity cannot be reduced to teaching via a series of steps in this way (Amabile, 1996;Boden, 1990;Weisberg, 2006). For that reason professional development (PD) has aimed to challenge teachers' conceptions of problem-solving in order to help them to integrate it into their classroom practices in a more meaningful and authentic way. ...
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Research relating to the nature and purpose of ‘design’ activity across education sectors has accelerated in recent years as governments and policy makers throughout the world highlight the importance of skills such as creative problem-solving and innovation. Within secondary schools, responsibility for teaching and learning through design is often assigned to Technology and Engineering subjects, however, gaps tend to exist in relation to what different teachers understand and experience about the teaching and learning of problem-solving and design in their classrooms. In this exploratory study, a small group of practicing secondary school teachers completed a one day training workshop where they were introduced to new knowledge and pedagogical skills relating to design problem-solving using a classroom intervention called ‘Designing Our Tomorrow’. The teachers participated in a focus group discussion before and after the workshop in which they discussed their experiences in teaching design. Conceptual Metaphor Theory (CMT) (Lakoff & Johnson Metaphors we live, University of Chicago Press, 1980) was employed to highlight the figures of speech used by the teachers during the focus groups and from these a number of conceptual metaphors were identified that described their understandings and experiences of teaching design problem-solving. In synthesizing the broad theoretical base relating to understandings of design problem-solving and CMT together with the findings from the one day professional development workshop, the paper highlights the potential value for researchers in using CMT to unpack teachers' views on how design problem-solving is taught and learned in schools. Finally, the paper reveals a potential new space to inform and evaluate future professional development of Technology teachers, particularly where the focus is on complex and difficult to define concepts such as design and problem-solving.
... T. Amabile (1996) nustatė, kad vidinė mo tyvacija kūrybą skatina, išorinė -slopina. 1908 m. ...
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Organizacija, kurianti pridėtinę vertę, turi būti kūrybiška, inovatyvi, nuolat keistis ir ieškoti naujų idėjų. Inovacija, kaip ir kūryba, šiame tyrime laikome problemų sprendimo procesą, kurio rezultatas – kūrybiški produktai. Kūrybišku produktu, metodu, informacija ir t. t. laikome tokį veiklos rezultatą, kuris yra ne tik naujas, originalus, išskirtinis, bet ir vertingas, naudingas, efektyvus. Tyrimo tikslas – identifikuoti organizacijoje vykdomo kūrybiško problemų sprendimo procesą lemiančius veiksnius ir sudaryti šių veiksnių modelį. Išanalizavę mokslinę literatūrą nustatėme, kad inovacijos proceso kokybę lemia du pagrindiniai veiksniai: kūrėjas (jo kūrybinis potencialas, asmenybės savybės, energija ir proceso valdymas) ir organizacija (aplinka, veiklos sąlygos, išoriniai subjektai ir organizacijos daroma įtaka kūrybos procesui).
... According to Amabile (1996), improving creativity requires three prerequisites: professional knowledge, creative thinking skills, and intrinsic motivation. Intrinsic motivation plays an important role in creativity. ...
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The online creativity generation research is a new field of creativity research. However, very little is known about the specific psychological processes of online idea generation. Against this background, this study explored the correlation between student intrinsic motivation and online creativity and possible mechanisms that may lie within this relationship. A sample of 423 Chinese students from three public universities participated in this study by completing measurements of intrinsic motivation, online learning engagement, creativity, and perceived teacher emotional support. The results indicated that student online learning engagement partially mediates the positive association between student intrinsic motivation and their online creativity. Teacher emotional support moderates the positive relationship between student intrinsic motivation and online learning engagement. Our findings suggested that student online creativity benefited from their intrinsic motivation in an online environment. The limitations of this study were also discussed.
... Even though there is a consensus among scholars on the notion that creativity can be taught (cf. Amabile, 1996;Craft, 2000;James, Lederman, & Vagt-Traore, 2004;Chen, 2010;, current literature fails to offer a detailed account of how creative talent cultivation is carried out systematically (Wei, 2018). ...
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Globalization has led to intense demand for diverse, multi-talent, and creative workforce to sustain market competitiveness, innovation, and corporate performance, while simultaneously intensifying challenges for higher education to transform. In Taiwan, universities have responded by formalizing and continuously restructuring their overall systems to cultivate creative talents for sustainable growth. The study has examined the practices that enable creative education at the National Chengchi University (NCCU) using data from different sources, i.e., semi-structured interviews, content analysis, and personal observations. Current findings suggest that creative education at NCCU is characterized by supporting environment and resources; interdisciplinary faculty teams; innovative HR practices for student recruitment; rich course content focused on students’ holistic development; teaching methods based on students’ experience, interaction, and teamwork; and conducive environment for creative learning.
... The existing research does not have any consensus regarding this. One group of authors suggests that internal motivation such as challenges has a key role in the encouragement of employee creativity (Amabile, 1996;Hackman and Oldham, 1980;Oldham and Cummings, 1996). Assignment of work tasks that are complex and challenging is a potential channel of creativity incitement in this context. ...
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Strong market competition is a prerequisite for new business approaches and the improvement of competitiveness based on the management system and a strategic framework while choosing the interventions which stimulate creativity. The aim of the paper is to point out the role and importance of managing organizational creativity. It is intended to answer the basic research question of whether organizations that successfully manage creativity have a competitive advantage. The creativity implementation in an organizational context depends on a wide range of elements and has a whole new dimension in business that is reflected in the readiness to take risks and apply different creative methods and techniques, especially how (and how successfully) an organization applies the methods of fostering creativity from the establishment of multidisciplinary or diverse teams, rotation of the employees, introducing financial and non-financial stimulations for development of the creativity, and training employees for the development and the interaction of creative ideas. The paper is based on a basic hypothesis that there is a statistically significant difference in achieving the competitive advantage of those companies that use the organizational creativity management system and those which do not. Research results suggest that successful creativity management positively influences the company's competitive advantage. Organizations implementing the creativity management system have a higher *
... In well-known theories of creativity (Amabile, 1996;Sternberg & Lubert, 1999), motivation is regarded as a critical element for creative learning. Creativity mindset (CM), grit, and self-determination have been defined as critical motivational variables (e.g., Hochanadel & Finamore, 2015;Karwowski, 2014;Yeh et al., 2020;) affecting learners' self-efficacy. ...
Article
Creativity mindset (CM), grit, and self-determination have been defined as critical motivational variables affecting learners' self-efficacy. Therefore, this study pioneers the examination of the relationship between these motivational variables and creativity self-efficacy (CSE) during game-based learning. A Creativity Mindset Inventory (CMI) and a game-based learning intervention were employed. Participants for developing the CMI were 281 3rd to 6th graders, and those for the intervention were 114 3rd and 4th graders. The result revealed that the CMI included four constructs (growth-internal control, growth-external control, fixed-internal control, and fixed-external control). Moreover, the employed intervention enhanced the children's growth CM and CSE. Regression analysis results suggest that self-determination mediates the influence of growth CM and grit on CSE. Additionally, growth CM, especially the growth-internal control CM, is a powerful predictor of self-determination and CSE. In contrast, fixed CM (the overall fixed CM, the fixed-internal control CM, or the fixed-external control CM) does not have any significant influence on self-determination or CSE. Notably, the findings of this study support that growth CM can be enhanced through a well scaffolded educational game. This study contributes to the field of game-based learning by developing a CM inventory, demonstrating a growth CM intervention, and clarifying influential factors to CSE during game-based training. While game-based learning has become popular among elementary school students, the findings of this study provide important insights into the design of game-based learning and creativity training.
... We have discussed stress above. But environments reward creativity differently (Amabile, 1996) and even have different conceptions of what it means to be creative. Conceptions of creativity differ from one place to another and a test that may be viewed as measuring-or a program that may be viewed as developing-creativity in a person in one socio-cultural setting may not be so perceived in another setting (e.g., Niu, 2019;Niu & Sternberg, 2001, 2002Rudowicz, 2003). ...
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Existing theories and frameworks generally have regarded creativity as inhering in a person, a task, a situation, or a combination of 2 of these 3 elements. After reviewing these approaches, and frameworks that are based on the interaction of more than 2 components, we propose a Person × Task × Situation synergistic paradigm, according to which creativity is dynamic and can be fully understood only as an interaction of all 3 of the elements. Building on the strengths of existing frameworks, our P × T × S proposal highlights: (a) the need to include the other 2 elements as moderators, regardless of which element is the central or starting point of the analysis, (b) the idea that the extent to which each element influences the others and the degree of overlap among elements can vary, and (c) the dynamic aspect of creativity, associated with changes in different persons across the lifespan, for different creative tasks, and for different situations. In addition to contributing an integrative theoretical account, this framework has significant, pragmatic implications for both the assessment and the development of creativity. We end with a call for both researchers and practitioners who test for or teach for creativity to specify the range of persons, tasks, and situations to which their assessments or training generalize.
... There are different stakeholders in the creative endeavor, from the actor to the audience (Glăveanu, 2013) and the judgment of what is creative is subjective. Yet a general consensus tends to emerge among experts about which products are more or less creative (Amabile, 1996;Kaufman & Baer, 2012). Similarly, the perception of what constitutes an effective act or a desirable outcome is subjective as well (Cropley et al., 2014). ...
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The dark side of creativity entails using original thought to meet a selfish, negative, or evil goal, with or without the deliberate intent to harm others. Recent empirical advances have studied the behavioral correlates of such creativity, including associations with aggression, deception, and subclinical psychopathy. The time, therefore, seems apt to propose a theoretical framework for dark creativity’s development and manifestation. This paper outlines the AMORAL model of dark creativity, which traces a creative action from its Antecedents to Mechanisms and Operants to its Realization, and to the subsequent Aftereffects and Legacy of the act. We use both real-life and simulated examples to illustrate the application of the theory across multiple domains, from law enforcement to interpersonal relationships. Our goal is to help guide future scholarship and measurement.
... Because of its indistinct and ambiguous definition, creativity has been considered a challenging subject to study empirically. However, psychology-based literature nowadays provides a wealth of evidence depicting the psychological factors that facilitate creativity: elements of personality, cognition and motivation can either facilitate or impair creativity (Amabile 1996;Csikszentmihalyi 2009;Sawyer 2012). ...
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... The motivators such as expected performance evaluation, competing for prizes or contracting for a reward can also lead to high levels of creativity (T. Amabile, 1996). She found that synergistic extrinsic motivators, which provide information or enable the person to better complete the task and which can act in concert with intrinsic motives, can be beneficial for creativity. ...
... Otros muchos autores han afrontado sus estudios desde la creatividad y la educación desde la perspectiva artística, autores como Eisner, Lowenfeld, Kogan, Arnheim, Amabile o Getzels, entre otros. Según Mackinnon (1975), estos estudios se han realizado mayoritariamente desde cuatro perspectivas indispensables: la del sujeto como ser creativo, la del proceso que se lleva a cabo, la del producto resultante y la de los contextos o situaciones que propician conductas denominadas creativas (Amabile, 1983;1996). Aun habiendo pasado mucho tiempo de algunas de estas investigaciones, hay patrones muy similares que aun aparecen en los estudios actuales. ...
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Resumen: En el presente artículo aborda mediante el análisis factorial, la interpretación de los datos resultantes de un cuestionario creado para conocer la percepción y la opinión que sobre la creatividad poseen estudiantes universitarios del Grado en Educación Primaria. Se indaga en la formación creativa que poseen, así como en la formación recibida en etapas formativas anteriores a la universitaria, desde la perspectiva de género, año académico y Bachillerato de procedencia. La muestra fue de 712 estudiantes pertenecientes a cinco cursos académicos diferentes, y encuestados al inicio de la primera asignatura artística cursada. La metodología se basó en la recogida de datos mediante un cuestionario Likert y su posterior procesamiento mediante el Análisis de Componentes Principales, ofreciendo unos resultados significativos entre el género y la percepción personal que sobre la creatividad se posee, así como también se encontraron diferenciadas significativas en cuanto al Bachillerato de procedencia y sobre la formación creativa recibida en su formación previa. Los datos obtenidos evidencian la necesidad de profundizar e insistir en la formación creativa en etapas previas a la universitaria, incidiendo en la necesidad de que los alumnos sean conscientes de los procesos para fomentar su creatividad en los que estén inmersos.
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Motivation, defined as the internal and/or external forces that initiate the triggering, direction, intensity and persistence of behavior, is often cited as one of the determinants of success in various areas of personal, professional or academic life. It is linked to emotional processes and contributes greatly to learning. This chapter presents three main theoretical approaches to motivation that are currently most influential in the field of learning and education. These are, self‐determination theory, achievement goal theory, and sense of self‐efficacy. The chapter then develops the consequences of the different ways of being motivated in academic work, in particular the consequences on academic performance, subjective evaluation of one's own competence, perseverance in the face of difficulty or even on well‐being. It identifies a number of suggested levers that can promote optimal academic motivation and that are the subject of consensus in the literature.
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