Conference Paper

Improvement of depressed symptoms through music compared with single psychotherapy

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Abstract

Background / Purpose: We designed a study testing the effects of music and compared it with the effects of psychotherapy in low and medium grades of depression. There are three main conventional treatments for depression: psychotherapy, pharmaceutical treatments, and electroconvulsive therapy. Because conventional treatment is not a guarantee for successful improvement, new means of treatment must be found that might improve depression when used together with any other of those therapies.In order to do this, we performed a randomized controlled trial with a convenience sample of 79 patients aged 25-60 years with a psychological diagnosis of low- and medium-grade depression. We employed the Zung depression scale for selection purposes. Patients were randomly assigned to the music therapy group (classical Music of Mozart, and baroque music of Corelli and Bach) (n= 41), or the psychotherapy group based on conductive-behavioral therapy (n= 38). The music therapy was applied for 50 min a day, every day, for eight weeks. Main conclusion: At the end, the music-therapy group had less depressive symptoms than the psychotherapy group, and this was proven to be statistically significant with the Friedman test.We propose that patients with low-grade and medium-grade depression can use music to enhance the effects of other therapies support.

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