Conference PaperPDF Available

A Model for Human-Computer Trust

Authors:

Abstract and Figures

Trusting is a rather complex phenomena and this complexity has been increasing with the pervasiveness of computing systems. In this virtual realms, Human-computer trust represents a key issue in today’s organizations, and it has a significative role in leveraging interactions and mediating interrelationships and auto-regulate knowledge sharing processes. This paper reports an research framework, which aims to facilitate the use of the acquired understanding of the role of trust in (A) Human Computer Interaction; and in (B) Computer mediated Interaction. Results situate the model as a key contribute for leveraging people’s interactions and their technological artefacts.
Content may be subject to copyright.
A preview of the PDF is not available

Supplementary resource (1)

... Trust has been a topic which has been receiving increased attention within the human computer interaction (HCI) community, as is evident from some recent publications (Sousa, Lamas, and Dias 2014;Lamas 2017, 2018;Lewis, Sycara, and Walker 2018;Yagoda and Gillan 2012). Much of this increased interest can be attributed to developments in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (Kuipers 2018). ...
... As put forth earlier, the main aim of the current study is to test the attributes of a human computer trust model (HCTM) proposed initially by Sousa, Lamas, and Dias (2014) to ascertain if they capture the essence of and help measure trust. HCTM was developed in four phases comprising of an extensive literature review on trust, a word elicitation study to capture a rich set of its multidisciplinary notions, participatory design sessions with users and unification of Davis (1989) and Venkatesh et al. (2003) technology acceptance models. ...
... HCTM was developed in four phases comprising of an extensive literature review on trust, a word elicitation study to capture a rich set of its multidisciplinary notions, participatory design sessions with users and unification of Davis (1989) and Venkatesh et al. (2003) technology acceptance models. As a result, Sousa, Lamas, and Dias (2014) were able to obtain a set of seven attributes (namely motivation, willingness, competence, benevolence, predictability, honesty and reciprocity) which would predict trust in user technology interactions. However, as with some of the models mentioned in the previous section, the major limitation with HCTM was that the attributes proposed in the model had not been empirically assessed to see if they actually do predict trust. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
New technologies, data, and algorithms impact nearly every aspect of daily life. Unfortunately, many of these algorithms operate like black boxes and cannot explain their results even to their programmers, let alone to end-users. As more and more tasks get delegated to such intelligent systems and the nature of user interactions with them becomes increasingly complex, it is important to understand the amount of trust that a user is willing to place on such systems. However, attempts at quantifying trust have either been limited in their scope or not empirically thorough. To address this, we build on prior work which empirically modelled trust in user-technology interactions and describe the development and evolution of a human computer trust scale. We present results of two studies (N=118 & N=183) which were undertaken to assess the reliability & validity of the proposed scale.
... Trust has been a topic which has been receiving increased attention within the human computer interaction (HCI) community, as is evident from some recent publications (Sousa, Lamas, and Dias 2014;Lamas 2017, 2018;Lewis, Sycara, and Walker 2018;Yagoda and Gillan 2012). Much of this increased interest can be attributed to developments in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (Kuipers 2018). ...
... As put forth earlier, the main aim of the current study is to test the attributes of a human computer trust model (HCTM) proposed initially by Sousa, Lamas, and Dias (2014) to ascertain if they capture the essence of and help measure trust. HCTM was developed in four phases comprising of an extensive literature review on trust, a word elicitation study to capture a rich set of its multidisciplinary notions, participatory design sessions with users and unification of Davis (1989) and Venkatesh et al. (2003) technology acceptance models. ...
... HCTM was developed in four phases comprising of an extensive literature review on trust, a word elicitation study to capture a rich set of its multidisciplinary notions, participatory design sessions with users and unification of Davis (1989) and Venkatesh et al. (2003) technology acceptance models. As a result, Sousa, Lamas, and Dias (2014) were able to obtain a set of seven attributes (namely motivation, willingness, competence, benevolence, predictability, honesty and reciprocity) which would predict trust in user technology interactions. However, as with some of the models mentioned in the previous section, the major limitation with HCTM was that the attributes proposed in the model had not been empirically assessed to see if they actually do predict trust. ...
Article
Full-text available
New technologies, data, and algorithms impact nearly every aspect of daily life. Unfortunately, many of these algorithms operate like black boxes and cannot explain their results even to their programmers, let alone to end-users. As more and more tasks get delegated to such intelligent systems and the nature of user interactions with them becomes increasingly complex, it is important to understand the amount of trust that a user is willing to place on such systems. However, attempts at quantifying trust have either been limited in their scope or not empirically thorough. To address this, we build on prior work which empirically modelled trust in user-technology interactions and describe the development and evolution of a human computer trust scale. We present results of two studies (N=118 & N=183) which were undertaken to assess the reliability and validity of the proposed scale. Our study contributes to the literature by (a) developing a multi-dimensional scale to assess user trust in HCI and (b) being the first study to use the concept of design fiction and future scenarios to study trust.
... To address the aforementioned issues, the goal of the present study is twofold. First, to further study formation and evaluation of trust in technical artifacts (more specifically on artifacts which are instances of HLT 's), we build on prior work [9,36] and empirically assess the suitability of a human computer trust model (HCTM) in user technology interactions. Second, by building on recent work on HLT 's [39,16], we advance discussions and suggest directions for future research on the topic. ...
... As mentioned earlier, the main aim of our study is to empirically assess suitability of HCTM [9,36] with technological artifacts which are instances of HLT. An important reason behind the pursuit of this model is its ability to appreciate and capture the multidimensional nature of trust, taking into account other attributes for trust measurement alongside the conventional trust attributes such as competence, benevolence, honesty etc. ...
... Conventionally, honesty is defined as a secure belief of an individual that the other person makes good faith agreements, tells the truth, and fulfills promises [24]. From a technical standpoint, honesty has been understood to be a users perception as to whether an artifact adheres to stringent processes and procedures regarding the management of their personal information and overall data integrity [9,36]. If the users perceive that the information which they exchange with an artifact is being managed according to certain rules and regulations, they perceive the artifact to be honest [12]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Trust is an important decision-making construct helping users to adopt and continually use a system. Despite its importance, past research has mainly focused on studying and researching it in technology mediated interactions. As nature of technical artifacts becomes increasingly intelligent and human-like, a theory for explaining and predicting trust in such artifacts also becomes important. However, studying trust relationship of a user with technical artifacts is still in its infancy. To address this, we build on prior work which empirically modelled trust in user technology interactions and evaluate a human computer trust model using partial-least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM). Our research results identify four factors: competence, benevolence, willingness & reciprocity which impact user trust. Suggestions for future applications of the model are also discussed. Our study contributes to the literature by advancing the discussion on (a) human-like technologies and (b) the role of trust in human-artifact relationship.
... People are getting more engaged, involved and reliant on technology for their day to day tasks. Considering the kind of technology being developed and the rate at which it is being developed, it is safe to say that computing is at one its most exciting moments, playing an essential role in supporting human activities, facilitated by growing availability of services, devices and interaction modalities, all associated with tangible consequences [67]. This is also supported by Häkkinen [24] who recognize the seamless ? ...
... With this in mind, the main aim of the present article is twofold: (1) First, we address the need for a dedicated model to quantify trust in the HCI domain. To advance this discussion, we wish to refine and empirically assess the suitability of socio-technical model (STM) of human computer trust proposed by Sousa et al. [67] in user technology interactions and (2) secondly, we advance the discussion on understanding the role of trust with technological artefacts and suggest directions for future research on the topic. ...
... As explained earlier, the present study is aimed at empirically assessing and refining the human-computer trust model [67]. The research questions associated with achieving this goal are as follows: ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Trust has shown to be a key factor influencing user uptake and acceptance of technologies. Despite the increase in interest in trust research and its stated importance in HCI, prior research has mainly focused on understanding its role in human to human interactions mediated through technology. The ongoing and rapid technological developments have made it necessary to move beyond studying trust relationships between people mediated by information technology (IT) and focus on studying the relationship of the user with the IT artifact itself. We recognize that HCI discipline lacks a focused body of knowledge on trust and there is a lack of theoretically grounded and robust psychometric instruments for quantifying trust. With this in mind, this article is aimed at empirically evaluating a socio-technical model of trust so as to assess its feasibility in user technology interactions. Using prior established measures and theories, we identify seven trust attributes and test the proposed model using partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM). Our study contributes to the literature by advancing the discussion of trust in human-artefact relationship.
... Specifically I discussed areas such as system and interface design from a "Simplicity, Consistency, Universality, Familiarity" (Mackay 2016b) perspective and wider system security engineering considerations such as "ACID -Atomic, Consistent, Isolate and Durable" (Mackay 2016b). I also formed a strong understanding of how trust is an important human aspect to consider, in a post reply I critically analysed Sousa et al. (2014) argument that trust can be viewed as a measurable risk perspective. I disagreed, stating that "trust for computer systems is a complex subject" (Mackay 2016c). ...
Article
Full-text available
MSc Module Paper covering Learning Reflection and some nascent understanding of philosophy. 1st person.
Article
Evidence from past news research suggested that people are less interested to read hard news including public affairs news. Focusing on Malaysia, this study examines the role of demographic variables, mobile and social media use for news, perceived news credibility and users’ motivations for news in explaining online consumption of public affairs news in the setting which is known for its tight media control. An online survey was employed to collect data from Malaysian Internet users, aged between 18 and 64, who regularly read news online. Data were analyzed using multiple regression. The findings of the study suggest that digital immigrants, or older news users, are more likely to consume public affairs news than young ones. Malaysians read public affairs news which they perceive to be highly credible to fulfill their information and social needs. News organizations in Malaysia can use these findings to design a strategic approach for a more competitive news industry.
Article
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The main goal of this paper is to present and validate a socio-technical model of trust. This model aims to depict the implications of trust on moderating learners online interactions. This work main motivation is focused on design ways to promote a stronger acceptance sense of community among learners, by giving emphasis to a more active learning through collaboration and social construction understanding. This model aims to eventually provide the means to detect potential trust violations within an online relationship, helping educators to move towards practices of reconciliation. This socio-technical trust model takes into account individuals trust predispositions and other five trust attributes and establishes their role on building relationships, and in developing underlying attitudes, behaviours and beliefs of an learning community. This paper starts by providing a contextualization on this research background and rationale, that leads to a the design of the preliminary exploratory model of model of trust, describes it validation procedure by setting results of a survey procedure.
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports an effort to investigate the potential of using real time data for deliver and help teachers in assessing and monitoring learner’s trust. This is due to the believe that by supporting trustful interactions (within technology enhanced learning scenarios) we are recognizing group vulnerabilities, and contribute for supporting positive actions and therefore reinforce learners autonomy and motivations. The work described here is part of an attempt to understand how trust can be leverage for supporting online learning creative collaboration. The work reported clarifies this understanding from a teacher perspective. It examines leaners’ trust commitments during real case scenario where international learners need to articulate and collaborate (at a distance) their learning tasks and skills. This line of research aims to recognize group vulnerabilities as a way to strengthen their cooperation and collaboration. We also believe that by understanding how to assess and monitor learners’ trust vulnerabilities, teachers could use this information to intervene (when needed) for provide positive support and contribute for positive actions among learners and therefore reinforce learners’ autonomy and motivations to engage in every-day creativity skills and innovations. The main achieved results so far reports that influence in learners behaviours. It points to three main aspects to observe regarding trust and it role in leverage supportive and positive actions, that is ob-serve (1) how learners perceive others intentions in a given context, (2) second observes learner's commitments changes towards a particular activity (level of cooperation) and final (3) observes learners perc Creativity, Trust, e-learning, Personal learning environments, Innovation, Learning Interactions, e-participation eptions towards the use of the communication mediums for learn-ing purpose (reactions, intentions of use and actual use).
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents an attempt to provide un understand of the possible trust influence in the successful development of online communities. This was achieved by implementing a research framework who aims to understand what is trust and it role in the online learning communities development and how does that interrelations is related with learners' activity and participation patterns. This research main rational was focused on the today's social changes, especially those who are related with people's education patterns. It believes that people's trust beliefs are somehow related with the online community development, and somehow is a key element for participation. Major contributions of this work are twofold (1) it briefly outline a research strategy and main motivation for exploring the above proposed relationship, (2) presents and discusses the early results of a survey carried out among e-learning communities. Results that explores the interrelation between people's trust beliefs and their sharing activities and participation attitudes in an online context.
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the role of trust in organizational response to crisis. Based on prior research and interviews with 33 top managers during a period of industry crisis, trust is conceptualized in terms of four dimensions: competence, openness, concern, and reliability. Trust at the group, organizational, and interorganizational levels is hypothesized to be positively related to decentralization of decision making, undistorted communication, and collaboration within and between organizations during crisis. Trust is also hypothesized to be positively related to organizational performance.