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An in vitro Antibacterial Activity of Different Effective Microorganism Cultures Against Pathogenic Species

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Abstract

Five different Effective Microorganisms (EM) were studied for their antimicrobial activity against various pathogenic bacterial in vitro. Type EM<sub>1</sub>, EM<sub>4</sub><sup> </sup>and EM<sub>5 </sub>showed good antibacterial activity against animal pathogens including Escherichia coli , Salmonella spp., Pasteurella spp., and Staphyococcus spp. There was an inverse correlation between the antibacterial and the higher dilution of the culture. All biologically active EM<sub>s</sub> may be used efficiently at the highest dilution of 10<sup>4</sup>, while the EM<sub>2</sub> and EM<sub>3</sub> proved ineffective against the pathogenic organisms under study.
... This is why these authors even pointed to the use of EM for disinfectant purposes. Another earlier work supporting the pathogen inhibitory character of EM is that of Rahman et al. [80]. These authors tested the effect of EM addition on four bacterial species: S. aureus, Pasteurella spp., Salmonella spp., and E. coli, which proved to be highly efficient in inhibiting and reducing the growth of the four bacterial species, in some cases even eliminating their presence from the culture medium. ...
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The traditional logic behind effective microorganism is based on a media inoculation with mixed cultures of beneficial microorganisms to create a more favorable environment for plant growth and health when the media is the soil. Following this rationale, other research works have been focused on studying the effect of effective microorganisms when they are used as manure stabilizing agents, in some cases by including them in animal diets, reporting, in all cases, beneficial properties. However, the use of effective microorganisms is not yet widespread. One reason may be that no rigorous research has so far been done on the actual utility of these mixed cultures on manure stabilization and crop production. In this work, the potential uses of effective microorganisms are shown with the focus on evaluating the influence of these mixed cultures on the biostabilization of manure before its use as fertilizer. This work also presents some new perspectives on the role and application of effective microorganisms as microbial inoculants to achieve a microbiological balance of manure so that it can improve its quality, increasing production and protection of crops when applied as fertilizer, helping to conserving natural resources and creating a more sustainable agriculture and environment. Finally, this document also reviews strategies on how to improve the effect of effective microorganisms after their inoculation into the soil as part of the manure.
... and Campylobacter spp were not used by current study and also by the Egyptian study. But what supports the results of the current study on the efficacy of the product are the results of study of Rahman et al (30), They were tested the product on four bacterial species; S. aureus, Pasteurella spp, Salmonella spp and E. coli, which proved highly efficient in inhibiting and reducing the growth of the four bacterial species respectively. Also, an expanded study (31) conducted at the University of Pretoria confirmed that the use of this product has inhibited the growth of Clostridium perfringens and the absence of necrotic enteritis in broiler with increased metabolism, feed consumption and improved intestinal mucosa. ...
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This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Effective Microorganisms (EM1®) for inhibiting the growth of some pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli were used in this study and isolated from pathological conditions. These bacteria were diagnosed in laboratory of microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Mosul. The colonies that taken from blood agar were 5-7 and cultured in the nutrient broth and incubated at 37 ºC for 24 hours. Bacterial growth was calibrated with the second tube of the McFarland tubes 0.5%. Several concentrations of EM product were prepared 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.125%. Decimal dilutions were done for each concentration of EM product with bacterial suspension, except control group was done for bacterial suspension with nutrient broth. The bacterial count was done on nutrient agar, milk agar and EMB agar. The results of this study showed that the product of EM1® within concentrations 0.5-1% was highly efficient in inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria under study. The bacterial count of both S. aureus and E. coli was 54x107 and 52x107 CFU/ ml respectively at 1% EM1®, and 67x107 and 86x107 CFU/ ml respectively at 0.5%, while the counting of the control group was 42x109 and 67x109 CFU/ ml respectively. This study concluded that EM1® at low concentrations have a clear role in inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria, particularly S. aureus and E. coli.
... The cause of different results between Thailand study and both of the current study and the Egyptian study, may be due to the difference in the bacterial species that used in the experiments; where Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp were not used by current study and also by the Egyptian study.But what supports the results of the current study on the efficacy of the product are the results of study of Rahmanet al., (28), They were tested the product on four bacterial species; Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella spp., Salmonella spp. and E. coli, which proved highly efficient in inhibiting and reducing the growth of the four bacterial species respectively. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Effective Microorganisms (EM1®) for inhibiting the growth of some pathogenic bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli were used in this study and isolated from pathological conditions. These bacteria were diagnosed in laboratory of microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine- University of Mosul. The colonies that taken from blood agar were (5-7) and cultured in the nutrient broth and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Bacterial growth was calibrated with the second tube of the McFarland tubes (0.5%). Several concentrations of EM product were prepared (1%, 0.5%, 0.25% and 0.125%). Decimal dilutions were done for each concentration of EM product with bacterial suspension, except control group was done for bacterial suspension with nutrient broth. The Bacterial count was done on Nutrient agar, Milk agar and EMB agar. The results of this study showed that the product of EM1® within concentrations (0.5-1%) was highly efficient in inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria under study. The bacterial count of both S. aureus and E. coli was (54 x107, 52 x107) CFU/ ml respectively at 1% EM1®, and (67x107, 86x107) CFU/ ml respectively at 0.5% , while the counting of the control group was (42 x 109, 67x 109) CFU/ ml respectively. This study concluded that EM1® at low concentrations have a clear role in inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria; particularly Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli.
... and Campylobacter spp were not used by current study and also by the Egyptian study. But what supports the results of the current study on the efficacy of the product are the results of study of Rahman et al (30), They were tested the product on four bacterial species; S. aureus, Pasteurella spp, Salmonella spp and E. coli, which proved highly efficient in inhibiting and reducing the growth of the four bacterial species respectively. Also, an expanded study (31) conducted at the University of Pretoria confirmed that the use of this product has inhibited the growth of Clostridium perfringens and the absence of necrotic enteritis in broiler with increased metabolism, feed consumption and improved intestinal mucosa. ...
... It helps to speed up the decomposition of organic matters and releasing nutrients to the soil. EM has unique ability to minimize the risk factors which may contribute towards the onset of pathological problems in plants and animals (Sajjad-ur-Rahman et al., 1999). Inoculation of EM cultures to the soil plant ecosystem can improve soil quality, soil health and the growth, yield and quality of the crops (Kengo and Huilian, 2000). ...
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