Conference PaperPDF Available

Effects of Parsley and Coriander leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats

Authors:
  • Faculty of Agriculture ,Cairo University

Abstract

The present study aimed to investigate the effect of hypercholesterolemic diet enriched with different levels of parsley or coriander on hypercholesterolemic rats. Sixty four male albino rats (Sprague- dawly strain) weighting 250±5g were assigned to 8 groups, each groups had 8 rats. The negative control received a basal diet throughout the experiment. However, the experimental groups including fifty six rats were fed on hypercholesterolemic diet for two weeks to develop hypercholesterolemia. The hypercholesterolemic rats were divided to seven groups, fed on hypercholesterolemic diet for six week, one from the seven groups was chosen as a positive control. The rats in the positive control continued on the same hypercholesterolemic diet. The six remaining groups of rats received hypercholesterolemic diets enriched with three different levels of dried coriander or parsley leaves. Results indicated that adding parsley or coriander at 10, 15 and 20% showed significantly (P<0.05) lower body weights and feed efficiency ratios compared with the corresponding values of normal or hypercholesterolemic rats. The effect of parsley was significantly higher than that of coriander. Serum lipids (TC, TG, LDL-c, VLDL-c) and LDL/HDL of hypercholesterolemic rats fed on diets with either parsley or coriander were significantly lower (P<0.05) compared to their corresponding values of the positive control but higher than those of negative control .HDL-c values in hypercholesterolemic rats fed on diets with 10 and 15% of coriander and 10 % of parsley insignificantly differed from that of negative control. The highest HDL-c was found for 20% of parsley, followed by the group getting 20% of coriander incorporation. Among the experimental groups the positive control group fed on hypercholesterolemic diet recorded the highest significant AST and ALT values (P<0.05). No significant differences were found among AST values of the other experimental groups. While, the lowest significant ALT value (P<0.05) was noticed in negative control group. AST and ALT values of all groups were in normal range. Histopathological studies in rats fed on diets with either parsley or coriander exerted protective effects on liver. Key words: parsley, coriander, serum lipids, hypercholesterolemia, histopathology, feed efficiency ratio, feed intake, weight gain, liver function
Effects of Parsley and Coriander
leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
G.M.El-Kherbawy*, E.S. Ibrahem
**
and S.A. Zaki
*
*
Home Economic Division, Food Technology Dept., Faculty of Agric., Cairo University
**
Agricultural Research Center-Giza
The 6
th
Arab and 3
rd
International
Annual Scientific Conference on:
Development of Higher Specific Education Programs in Egypt and
the Arab World in the Light of Knowledge Era Requirements
Faculty of Specific Education
Mansoura University - Egypt
April, 13-14, 2011
2011
2011 م / 1432ـه
ةر ا ا آ
ايا )سدا اا وا (
ا او   ا ا ا ا 
ا  ت ء 
ا ـــ  ة13 14أ ـــ2011
2126
Effects of Parsley and Coriander leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
The 6
th
Arab and 3
rd
International
Annual Scientific Conference
2127
Development of Higher Specific Education Programs in Egypt and the Arab World
Faculty of Specific Education
Mansoura University - Egypt April, 13-14, 2011
Effects of Parsley and Coriander
leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
By
G.M.El-Kherbawy*, E.S. Ibrahem
**
and S.A. Zaki
*
*
Home Economic Division, Food Technology Dept., Faculty of Agric., Cairo University
**
Agricultural Research Center-Giza
Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate the effect of hypercholesterolemic
diet enriched with different levels of parsley or coriander on hypercholesterolemic
rats. Sixty four male albino rats (Sprague- dawly strain) weighting 250±5g were
assigned to 8 groups, each groups had 8 rats. The negative control received a basal
diet throughout the experiment. However, the experimental groups including fifty
six rats were fed on hypercholesterolemic diet for two weeks to develop
hypercholesterolemia. The hypercholesterolemic rats were divided to seven groups,
fed on hypercholesterolemic diet for six week, one from the seven groups was
chosen as a positive control. The rats in the positive control continued on the same
hypercholesterolemic diet. The six remaining groups of rats received
hypercholesterolemic diets enriched with three different levels of dried coriander or
parsley leaves. Results indicated that adding parsley or coriander at 10, 15 and 20%
showed significantly (P<0.05) lower body weights and feed efficiency ratios
compared with the corresponding values of normal or hypercholesterolemic rats.
The effect of parsley was significantly higher than that of coriander. Serum lipids
(TC, TG, LDL-c, VLDL-c) and LDL/HDL of hypercholesterolemic rats fed on
diets with either parsley or coriander were significantly lower (P<0.05) compared
to their corresponding values of the positive control but higher than those of
negative control .HDL-c values in hypercholesterolemic rats fed on diets with 10
and 15% of coriander and 10 % of parsley insignificantly differed from that of
negative control. The highest HDL-c was found for 20% of parsley, followed by
the group getting 20% of coriander incorporation. Among the experimental groups
the positive control group fed on hypercholesterolemic diet recorded the highest
significant AST and ALT values (P<0.05). No significant differences were found
among AST values of the other experimental groups. While, the lowest significant
ALT value (P<0.05) was noticed in negative control group. AST and ALT values
of all groups were in normal range. Histopathological studies in rats fed on diets
with either parsley or coriander exerted protective effects on liver.
Key words: parsley, coriander, serum lipids, hypercholesterolemia,
histopathology, feed efficiency ratio, feed intake, weight gain, liver function.
2128
Effects of Parsley and Coriander leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
The 6
th
Arab and 3
rd
International
Annual Scientific Conference
Effects of Parsley and Coriander
leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
By
G.M.El-Kherbawy*, E.S. Ibrahem
**
and S.A. Zaki
*
*
Home Economic Division, Food Technology Dept., Faculty of Agric., Cairo University
**
Agricultural Research Center-Giza
Introduction
Cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death and illness in the
developed countries, became the pre-eminent health problem worldwide.
Atherosclerosis, a progressive disease characterized by the accumulation of
cholesterol, LDL-C and fibrous elements in the large arteries, would constitute
the most important contributor to this growing burden of cardiovascular disease
(Toshima et al.,2000; Yokozawa et al., 2003 ; Jeong et al., 2005., Parsaee et
al., 2006 and Stapleton et al.,2010).
The major drugs used for treatment of hyperlipidemia have several
adverse effects (Kojuri et al., 2007). Herbal medicinal uses have increased in
the World as an alternative solution to health problems.
The cardioprotective effect of flavonoids could be attributed to its
antioxidant, antithrombogenic, and lipid lowering properties and its effect on
promoting endothelial function (Pon and Dongmin, 2009).
Apigenin, one of the main flavonoids in parsley showed strong
antioxidant effects, increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and, in turn,
decreasing the oxidative damage to tissues (Nielsen et al., 1999; Melo et al.,
2005; Ozsoy- Sacan et al., 2006 and Kolarovic et al., 2010).
As coriander extracts showed antioxidant activity, its addition to foods would
increase the antioxidant content and has a potential as natural antioxidant and
thus inhibit unwanted oxidation processes (Wangensteen et al., 2004; Melo et
al., 2005 and Dhanapakiom et al., 2008).
In spite of considerable attention has been directed toward evaluating
mechanisms by which hypercholesterolemia might impact vascular outcomes.
These included both results of direct cholesterol lowering therapies and
alternative interventions for improving vascular function (Stapleton et al.,
2010). Limited studies have concerned with phytochemicals for its antioxidant
activity and effects as potential functional foods for decreasing the risk factors
2129
Development of Higher Specific Education Programs in Egypt and the Arab World
Faculty of Specific Education
Mansoura University - Egypt April, 13-14, 2011
of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. The present study aimed to
investigate the effects of parsley and coriander at three levels 10, 15 and 20%
on hypercholesterolemic rats.
Materials and methods
Materials
Plant materials
The plant materials used in this investigation included parsley (Petroslimum
crispum) and coriander (Coriandrum Sativum) leaves were purchased from the
local market in Giza.
Chemicals
Minerals, cholesterol and bile salts were obtained from El-Gomhoria
Company for chemical and medical equipments, El-Ameyria, Cairo, Egypt.
Casein, cellulose, starch and vitamins were obtained from Morgan Company for
chemicals, Cairo, Egypt.
Kits
Kits were purchased from Gama Trade Company for chemicals, Cairo,
Egypt.
Experimental animals
Sixty four male albino rats (Sprague Dawley strain) weighing 250 ± 5g
were obtained from Helwan Farm, Ministry of Health and Population, Cairo,
Egypt.
Methods
Preparation of plant materials
Parsley and coriander leaves were washed with tap water, chopped into
small pieces and then separately dried in an air-circulated oven at 40°C to
complete dryness A.O.A.C., (2005). The dried materials were separately
reduced into powder form as far as possible and stored kept in the refrigerator at
4°C until use.
Animals' adaptation
The experimental was conducted in the animal house of Agricultural
Research Center, Giza, Cairo, Egypt. Male rats were placed for an adaptation
period of one week and were fed on basal diet to allow them to adjust to the
new environment. Rats were individually housed in stainless steel wire-bottom
2130
Effects of Parsley and Coriander leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
The 6
th
Arab and 3
rd
International
Annual Scientific Conference
cages at room temperature of about 25 ± 2°C with water bottles under hygienic
condition and fed on basal diet ad libitum.
Preparation of the experimental diets
The basal diet (BD) consisted of 140 g casein (83 % protein), 100 g
sucrose , 50 g corn oil , 50 g cellulose, 35 g mineral mixture, 10 g vitamin
mixture, 1.8 g L-cystine, 2.5 g choline bitartrate and the remainder (610.6 g)
corn starch. Diets were formulated according to Reeves et al., (1993).
For the hypercholesterolemic diet (HD), 10 g cholesterol, 2.5 g bile salt and
150 g beef tallow were added to the same amounts ingredients in basal diet
except for cornstarch (448.1 g) according to Zulet et al., (1999).
Experimental design and diet protocols
After the adaptation period, 64 rats were randomly assigned to the
control and hypercholesterolemic groups. The control group (8 animals)
received the basal diet (control negative). The other groups (56 rats) were
fed on a hypercholesterolemic diet for 2 weeks. After the development of
hypercholesterolemia the hypercholesterolemic rats were divided into seven
sub-groups of eight rats each. One group of rats (control positive) continued on
hypercholesterolemic diet without any addition. The six remaining groups
received hypercholesterolemic diet with three levels (10, 15 and 20 %) of dried
coriander or parsley. The composition of different experimental diets illustrated
in table (1). At the end of experimental period (6 weeks), rats were fasted over
night before sacrificing. Blood was collected and centrifuged. Serum was
separated for analysis.
2131
Development of Higher Specific Education Programs in Egypt and the Arab World
Faculty of Specific Education
Mansoura University - Egypt April, 13-14, 2011
Table (1): Composition of different experimental diets:
Hypercholesterolemic diets
Ingredients
(g) BD HD
H D C 1
(HD +10%
Coriander)
H D C 2
(HD+15%
Coriander)
H D C 3
(HD+20%
Coriander)
H D P 1
(HD +10%
Parsley)
H D P 2
(HD+15%
Parsley)
H D P 3
(HD+20%
Parsley)
Cornstarch 610.6
448.1
450.9 452.3 453.7 451.4 453.04 454.7
Casein 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140
Sucrose 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
Corn oil 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50
Cholesterol 0 10 10 10 10 10 10 10
Cellulose 50 50 47.2 45.8 44.4 46.7 45.06 43.4
Bile salt 0 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5
Beef tallow 0 150 150 150 150 150 150 150
Mineral mixture
35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35
Vitamin mixture
10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10
L-cystine 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8
Choline
bitartrate
2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5
Coriander 0 0 100 150 200 0 0 0
Parsley 0 0 0 0 0 100 150 200
Chemical analysis
For each group the analyses included the following:
Total cholesterol was determined according to Flegg, (1973). The
determination of serum triglycerides (TG) was done according to Buccolo and
David, (1973) while high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) was
determined according to Kostner, (1977).
Low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) and Very low density
lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-c) were calculated as described by
Friedewalde, et al., (1972) using the following equations:
LDL-C =TC–(HDL-C+LDL-C).
VLDL-C = TG/5.
LDL-C/HDL-C ratio was calculated.
Serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST)
were measured according to Reitman and Frankel, (1957).
Biological Evaluation
During the experimental period (6 Weeks), the net feed intake was daily
recording, while body weight was weekly recorded. The net feed intake and
gained body weight were used for the calculation of feed efficiency ratio (FER)
as follows:
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Effects of Parsley and Coriander leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
The 6
th
Arab and 3
rd
International
Annual Scientific Conference
Body weight gain (g)
(FER %) = ---------------------------- × 100
Feed intake (g)
Histopathological analysis
The tissues of liver were fixed in 10% formalin and embedded in
paraffin wax. Section of 4-5 microns thickness were made using rotary
microtome and stained with haematoxylin-eosin and histological observation
were made under light microscope (Carleton, 1979).
Statistical analysis
The results are presented as means ±S.D. The obtained data were
statistically analyzed according to the SPSS-PC (statistical package software,
version, 11.0). One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the
differences between groups (SPSS, 1999).
Results and discussion
Effect of parsley and coriander addition on body weight and feed efficiency
ratio in hypercholesterolemic rats
Body weight and feed intakes of rats obtained after 6 weeks of feeding of
the different groups are shown in Figure (1).The body weights of the rats for all
the experimental groups were similar.
Figure (1): Body weight and feed intake in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats.
Among the experimental groups, the body weight of the negative
control group fed for 2 weeks on basal diet had the lowest value. However,
hypercholesterolemic rats fed on different diets showed similar body weights.
2133
Development of Higher Specific Education Programs in Egypt and the Arab World
Faculty of Specific Education
Mansoura University - Egypt April, 13-14, 2011
When feed intakes were measured, it was found that
hypercholesterolemic groups fed on hypercholesterolemic diets with either
parsley or coriander showed higher value as compared with normal control
group. The addition of parsley or coriander demonstrated the lowest feed
intakes among experimental groups. Increasing the level of addition showed
associated slightly lower feed intakes. Negligible differences between feed
intakes of parsley and coriander groups were seen.
The final body weights and body weight gains of rats obtained after 6
weeks of feeding in the different experimental groups were illustrated in the
figure(2).
Figure (2): Final body weights and Body weight gain in normal and
hypercholesterolemic rats.
The final body weight showed the same trend of body weight gain.
These results indicated that adding either parsley or coriander to the diet
showed lower values of body weight. Lower body weight of the
hypercholesterolemic rats fed on parsley or corianders were proportionally
adversely associated with increasing the level of addition.
The highest body weight gain was observed for the
hypercholesterolemic (positive group), followed by that of normal control
(negative group). However, the hypercholesterolemic rats fed on
hypercholesterolemic diet with parsley or coriander demonstrated lower values
of body weight gain compared to the other two groups (negative and positive
control). Very slight differences were noticed among the groups fed on diets
with parsley and coriander. Increasing the level of parsley or coriander addition
showed negligible lower value of body weight gain.
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Effects of Parsley and Coriander leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
The 6
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Arab and 3
rd
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Annual Scientific Conference
Body weight gain percentages and feed efficiency ratios of the different
experimental groups are presented in Table (2).
Table (2): Body weight gain percents (BWG %) and feed efficiency ratio (FER) of
normal and hypercholesterolemic rats fed on different experimental
diets
Groups BWG% FER
N C 15.07±17
b
0.992±0.07
b
P C 25.94±1.42
a
1.262±0.07
a
H D C 1 - 0.03±1.5
c
- 0.003±0.11
c
H D C 2 - 3.14±1.5
de
- 0.250±0.12
de
H D C 3 - 5.59±1.38
f
- 0.459±0.11
f
H D P 1 - 2.39±1.04
d
- 0.189±0.08
d
H D P 2 - 3.9±1.64
e
- 0.313±0.13
e
H D P 3 - 8.63±0.83
g
- 0.727±0.07
g
Values are expressed as means ± SD.
Means with the different letter superscripts in the same column denote significance at P <
0.05
Although positive control group demonstrated the highest values of
weight gain percent and feed efficiency ratio, the other hypercholesterolemic
groups fed on hypercholesterolemic diet with different levels of parsley or
coriander were not only significantly lower values compared with those of both
negative and positive groups but also compared with those recorded at the start
of the experiment. Parsley addition demonstrated more pronounced effects in
decreasing body weight gain percent and food efficiency ratio than these of
coriander. The effect of both parsley and coriander addition was proportional to
their level, which might be ascribed to the higher fiber content of these diets.
These diets are in the same line with those of Matos et al., (2005)
The efficiency of these treatments in reducing body weight gain and
food efficiency ratio could be a potential for reducing body weight and thus
treating obesity.
Effect of parsley and coriander leaves on lipid profile in normal and
hypercholesterolemic rats
Serum lipids (TC, TG, VLDL-c, LDL-c and HDL-c and LDL/HDL in
the normal and hypercholesterolemic rats fed on diets without or with different
levels of coriander and parsley were recorded in Table (3).
2135
Development of Higher Specific Education Programs in Egypt and the Arab World
Faculty of Specific Education
Mansoura University - Egypt April, 13-14, 2011
Table (3): Lipid profile in normal and hypercholesterolemic rat groups fed on
different experimental diets
HDL-C LDL-C VLDL-C
TG TC LDL/H
DL
mg/dl
Groups
0.63
±
0.06
f
59.37
±
2.50
cd
37.60
±
2.39
f
12.40
±
0.28
f
62.00
±
1.41
f
109.38
±
2.26
g
N C
7.10
±
0.59
a
34.25
±
2.71
e
242.15
±
2.73
a
25.85
±
0.58
a
129.25
±
2.91
a
302.25
±
4.23
a
P C
2.54
±
0.13
b
57.37
±
1.84
d
146.00±
3.370
b
17.62±
0.84
b
88.12±
4.22
b
221.00±
2.82
b
H D C 1
2.23 ±
0.22
c
60.25
±
3.91
c
133.97
±
4.54
c
16.40
±
0.38
c
82.00
±
1.92
c
210.63
±
2.97
d
H D C 2
1.77
±
0.13
de
65.37
±
2.92
b
116.20
±
4.27
d
15.67
±
0.51
de
78.37
±
2.56
de
197.25
±
3.05
e
H D C 3
2.22
±
0.17
c
61.37
±
2.973
c
136.38
±
5.07
c
17.25
±
0.69
b
86.25
±
3.49
b
215.00
±
4.24
c
H D P 1
1.82
±
0.20
d
64.87
±
4.01
b
117.75
±
5.95
d
16.00
±
0.28
cd
80.00
±
1.41
cd
198.63
±
3.54
e
H D P 2
1.54
±
0.08
e
68.62
±
2.82
a
106.25
±
3.46
e
15.25
±
0.45
e
76.25
±
2.25
e
190.13
±
4.22
f
H D P 3
Values are expressed as means ± SD.
Means with the different letter superscripts in the same column denote significance at P < 0.05
The results in table (3) demonstrated that hypercholesterolemic rats
(control positive group) showed significantly (P<0.05) higher values of serum
T.C, TG, VLDL-c, LDL-c and LDL/HDL ratio but significantly lower HDL-c
as compared to control negative group.
Groups fed on diets with parsley and coriander at the three different
levels demonstrated significantly (P<0.05) higher values of HDL-c but lower of
other lipids (LDL-c, VLDL, TG and LDL-c/HDL-c) compared to the
hypercholesterolemic rats fed on hypercholesterolemic diet without addition.
There were significant differences between serum lipids in rats fed on the three
levels of coriander and parsley. Increasing supplementation level exhibited
lower mean values of TC, TG, VLDL- c, LDL-c and LDL/HDL ratio and
higher values of HDL-c.
The values of HDL-c in hypercholesterolemic rats fed on diets with 10
and 15% of either parsley or coriander did not significantly differed from that of
normal negative control. Parsley supplementation exerted more effect than that
of coriander. The highest HDL-c was found for parsley (20%), followed by the
group getting the same percent of coriander incorporation.
Epidemiological studies have shown that high HDL-c levels could
potentially contribute to anti-atherogenesis, including inhibition of LDL-c
2136
Effects of Parsley and Coriander leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
The 6
th
Arab and 3
rd
International
Annual Scientific Conference
oxidation to protect the endothelial cells from the cytotoxic effects of oxidized
LDL (Harrison et al., 2003). The in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity of
parsley leaves extract exhibited a certain protective effect as good scavenges of
OH radicals (Popovic et al., 2006). Coriander has demonstrated significant
hypocholesterolemic action (Dhanapakiam et al., 2008) and could alter lipid
metabolism by decreasing lipid uptake and enhancing lipid metabolism. Such
effect of coriander or parsley on LDL-c and HDL-c might be related to the
presence of flavonoids, and phenolic compounds as reported in some studies
(Nielsen et al., 1999, Weggemans et al., 2003 and Wangensteen et al., 2004).
In this respect, Pon and Dongmin, (2009) demonstrated that, flavonoids
possess the bioactivity to beneficially affect the cardiovascular risk factors such
as lipoprotein oxidation, dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction and blood
platelet aggregation. Rashed et al.( 2010) also reported that, rats fed the control
diet containing mixture of whole wheat, (cabbage or, red beet root), parsley and
pepper showed a significant reduction in plasma total lipids, TC, LDL-c, TG
and the ratio of TC /HDLc in different degrees, while HDL-c significantly
increased. In this respect,
Effect of coriander and parsley on AST and ALT in normal and
hypercholesterolemic rats
Liver enzymes (AST and ALT) of the normal and hypercholesterolemic
rats at the end of the experiment were presented in Table (4).
Table (4): AST and ALT in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats fed on different
experimental diets
ALT AST
(µ/L)
Groups
27.62±1.59
e
52.87±3.681
b
N C
47.75±2.54
a
76.87±2.85
a
P C
34.87±2.10
b
55.00±3.66
b
H D C 1
33.62±2.13
bc
53.25±3.45
b
H D C 2
32.00±2.72
c
53.12±2.29
b
H D C 3
33.50±1.77
bc
54.50±2.32
b
H D P 1
31.87± 1.95
c
53.12±3.39
b
H D P 2
29.62±1.06
d
52.12±1.95
b
H D P 3
Values are expressed as means ± SD.
Means with the different letter superscripts in the same column denote significance at P < 0.05.
The mean values of serum AST and ALT concentration in
hypercholesterolemic group showed the highest significant values (P<0.05)
2137
Development of Higher Specific Education Programs in Egypt and the Arab World
Faculty of Specific Education
Mansoura University - Egypt April, 13-14, 2011
among the experimental groups. On the other hand, the lowest significant levels
of liver enzymes were observed for negative control group (P<0.05).
Insignificant differences were found among AST values of the other
experimental groups. Among the experimental groups, the lowest significant
ALT (P<0.05) was noticed in negative control group (P<0.05).
Adding parsley or coriander showed significant differences (P<0.05).
ALT values that were significantly higher than those of positive normal control
but lower than the corresponding values noticed for negative control. Thus, it is
obvious that the addition demonstrated adverse effect on ALT in
hypercholesterolemic rats. Slight differences were observed among
hypercholesterolemic fed on diets enriched with the different levels of parsley
or coriander. These results are in accordance with those observed for coriander
and parsley (Popovic, et al., 2006; Ozsoy-Sacan, et al., 2006; Sreelatha, et
al., 2009 and Kolarovic, et al., 2009). The values of AST and ALT of the
positive group and those fed on diets with parsley and coriander were in the
normal range.
Serum AST and ALT have been considered as sensitive indicators of
hepatic injury that could alter their transport functions and membrane
permeability, leading to the leakage of enzymes from their cells. This leakage
would cause an increase in ALT and AST levels that might explain their values
of control positive of this study (Krishna et al., 2007)..
Histopathological Results
Histopathological examination of liver sections of control group
showed normal cellular architecture with distinct hepatic cells, sinusoidal
spaces and central vein (Pict. 1),While disarrangement of normal hepatic cell
were observed in the (control positive ) hypercholesterolemic rat (Pict. 2) .
Pict. (2):
liver of hypercholesterolemic rat
degeneration of hepatocytes and (control
positive) showing hydropic hepatic
simisoidal leucocutosis ( H & E ×200) .
Pict. (1):
liver of control negative group
showing the normal histology of (H & E
×200).
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Effects of Parsley and Coriander leaves on hypercholesterolemic rats
The 6
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The liver section of the hypercholesterolemic rat fed on diets with 10%
percent coriander and parsle showed wide spread fat vacules in the
hepatocytes, while those fed on diet with the same percent of parsley
demonstrated hypertrophy & hyperplasia of kupffer cells and few apoptotic cell
(pict.3 and 4).
Pict .(4) liver of hypercholesterolemic rat treated
with parsley 10 % showing the
hypertrophy&hyperplasia of kupffer cells
and few apoptotic cell (H&E × 200).
Pict. (3) liver of hypercholesterolemic rat
treated with 10% corinder showing wide
spread fat vacules in hepatocytes (H&E ×
200).
However , the addition of higher percentages (15 %) of coriander
exhibited protiction against the hypercholesterolemic diet as focal area of
hepatocellular necrosis replaced with Inflammatory(pict.5) or 15% of parsley
as early reaction of inflammatory cells replacing necrotic area and apoptotic
cells (pict.6).
Pict .(6):liver of hypercholesterolemic rat treated 15
%parsley showing early reaction of
inflammatory cells replacing necrotic area and
apoptotic cells (H&E ×200).
Pict.(5): liver of hypercholesterolemic rat treated with
15% corinder showing focal area of
hepatocellular necrosis replaced with
inflammatory cells (H&E × 200).
2139
Development of Higher Specific Education Programs in Egypt and the Arab World
Faculty of Specific Education
Mansoura University - Egypt April, 13-14, 2011
Increasing the level of incorporation prohibited the adverse effect of
hypercholesterolemic diet since, 20% of coiriander induced few fat laden
hepatocytes (pict.7) and 20% ofparsley only cused mild fatty degeneration of
hepatocytes(pict.8).
Pict .(8): liver of hypercholesterolemic rat treated 20
%parsley showing showing mild fatty
degeneration of hepatocytes ells (H&E ×100).
Pict.(7): liver of hypercholesterolemic rat treated
with 20% corinder showing few fat
ladenhepatocytes (H&E × 200).
Finally, it could be concluded that the histopathological studies in rats
fed on diets with either parsley or coriander exerted protective effects on liver.
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ﺔﺑﺎﺼﳌﺍ ﻥﺍﺮﺌﻔﻟﺍ ﻰﻠﻋ ﺓﺮﺑﺰﻜﻟﺍﻭ ﺲﻧﻭﺪﻘﺒﻟﺍ ﻕﺍﺭﻭﺃ ﲑﺛﺄﺗ
ﻝﻭﲑﺘﺴﻴﻟﻮﻜﻟﺍ ﻯﻮﺘﺴﻣ ﻉﺎﻔﺗﺭﺎﺑ
يوا ي ةد
*
هاإ  نإ ،
**
آز ا   ،
*
*
اا تا  )ا دا  ( ارا آ ةها 
**
ارا ثا آ ةا
ﻲﺑﺮﻌﻟﺍ ﺺﺨﻠﳌﺍ
ةاو وا   ت إ  ارد إ ا ا ف ت
ما  لوا ى عر ا ناا .   ا 64  ار
ا رآا)واد ا ( ا ا  ازوأ وا5 ± 250  ا ز 
8  آ ت 8  نا ُأ  ُ   آ هاإ ت
ا    ا ا .  و  ا تا     
ا ه ىإ  تا و أ ة لوا ا ت)  آ
 ( ا   ا ه  )6أ ( تو  ُتا  
ا ةا وأ وا قاروأ     ف لوا .
 ا وا قاروأ  آ إ نأ ا تأ و10 ،15 ،20 %
ي ضا ثو إ ىدأ او ا ا ا   ر ت
)P<0.05 ( ءاا ةءآ لو ناا نازوأ  آ  . أ نآ وا  نأ و
ةا    ر .
ا  آ  نأ  ا توا ،ا تاا ،ا لو
آ ةا وأ وا  ف تو   ا نا ًا ا او ا
 أ)P<0.05 ( أ ا   و ،ا ا ا   
ً)P<0.05 (     ،ا ا ا نا ا  
 ف تو    ا ناا ت ا ا توا10 ،15 %
و ةا 10 % ا ا ا    ً  وا  . وو
نأ إ  ا ا    أ20 % ا ا   وا 
ةا   ا  إ  .
 أ ا ا ا  آ)P<0.05 (ا ت  .
إ   تASTا تا  ى  أ آ  ، ALT  آ
ا ا ا .  آوALT, AST ا دوا  تا  .
لوا ا ت ةا وأ وا إ نأ ا ا أ
ا  و تا .
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