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Instant Symposium — Connecting with the World's Best Talent: Attracting and Retaining Diverse Entomologists

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... Given the problems of lack of representation of minority groups in the fi eld of entomology and the consequences of this inequity to the profession (Smith and Hendrix 2014, Walker 2018, Tsui 2007, there is growing interest in implementing approaches to actively recruit and retain students, postdocs, and faculty from more diverse backgrounds in advanced degree programs in entomology (McGlynn 2017). For this reason, the development of diversity statements for entomology programs is a critical fi rst step to express the collective views of academic units on diversity and inclusion in a written and more permanent format. ...
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