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Abstract

cosmetic is defined as an "article intended to be rubbed, poured, sprinkled, or sprayed on the human body for the purpose of cleaning, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or function." [1] Appropriate skin care contributes to successful management of acne. Skin care needs to be rational, flexible, and adaptive. The objective is to keep the skin and hair (scalp) clean, to control oiliness and prevent excessive dryness, to understand the changing needs of the skin on a daily basis brought about by variations in environmental conditions, physical activities, and the effects of topical and systemic treatments, and to compensate for such changes so as to maintain the skin in a near-ideal state. This is possible to achieve by balancing cleansing, moisturizing, and judicious use of supplemental skin care products.
S55Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol | January-February 2009 | Vol 75 | Supplement 1
Acne in India: Guidelines for management
Cosmetics and skin care in acne
Cosmetics and skin care in acne
A cosmetic is defined as an “article intended to
be rubbed, poured, sprinkled, or sprayed on the
human body for the purpose of cleaning, beautifying,
promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance
without affecting the body’s structure or function.”[1]
Appropriate skin care contributes to successful
management of acne. Skin care needs to be rational,
flexible, and adaptive. The objective is to keep the skin
and hair (scalp) clean, to control oiliness and prevent
excessive dryness, to understand the changing needs
of the skin on a daily basis brought about by variations
in environmental conditions, physical activities, and
the effects of topical and systemic treatments, and to
compensate for such changes so as to maintain the
skin in a near-ideal state. This is possible to achieve
by balancing cleansing, moisturizing, and judicious
use of supplemental skin care products.
Cleansers: The purpose of cleansing is to remove
dirt, sebum, and sweat that could stick on to an oily
skin. Soaps are not recommended as they dry up the
skin which is already dry and irritated with topical
medications such as retinoids and BPO. Frequent
washing to reduce oiliness is counterproductive as
it leads to rebound oiliness through irritation of the
sebaceous gland. Steaming, scrubbing, and the use
of exfoliants make acne worse. Soap-free cleansers
with pH of 5–7 are the best. Salicylic-acid-containing
cleansers as gels and foams are helpful in the early
stages of treatment. Lathering antiseptics, lather-
producing gels or creams, should be discouraged as
they can irritate acne-treated skin. Cleansing milk
is better for make-up removal versus toners and
astringents.
Shaving: Daily shaving can irritate the skin. An electric
shaver may be better option than hand-held razor.[2] A
shaving gel or cream is better than shaving foam. A
moisturizing lotion is better than conventional after-
shave lotion.
Hair oils: Liberal use of hair oils or oil massages is
to be discouraged as this could contribute to pomade
acne. Frequent shampooing is advised to keep scalp
free of seborrhea.
Adjuvants cosmetics: Cosmetics with fragrances and
photosensitizers should be avoided. Water-based
foundation is safe to use.
Moisturizers: Most topical antiacne treatments lead
to dryness or desquamation of skin. Appropriate use
of oil-free moisturizers should be permitted or even
encouraged. The objective is to correct dryness to be
comfortable in feeling and appearance without causing
oiliness.
Sunscreen products: Some acne treatments have the
potential to cause photosensitivity. Even otherwise, a
parallel objective of treatment is to enhance the skin.
Sunprotection and tan prevention is encouraged. This
requires identifying a suitable sunscreen product
which is then incorporated in the daily routine. Most
sunscreens are too oily for acne patients and tend to
aggravate it. Lately, some sunscreen gels and oil-free
lotions have become available that are suitable for
acne patients.
Masks: These are the products that contain substances
like clay, kaolin, or talc, which can absorb sebum and
make the skin temporarily dry.[3]
Exfoliators: These are the products which contain
cornedolytics like salicylic acid, glycolic acid, and
resorcinol. They are available as cleansers, washes,
leave-on-gels, and scrubs. Exfoliators speed the natural
renewal of skin cells and help in the treatment of acne
by alleviating comedones.[4]
Foundations: They are thick and occlusive and can
lead to cosmetic acne. Hence, oil-free foundations are
better. Oils in foundations are substituted by silicone
derivatives like cyclometissue or dimethicone.
In conclusion, dermatologists should acquire sound
knowledge and familiarity with skin care products
that need to be recommended or condemned as part
of acne management. Skin care products labeled as
“noncomedogenic” or “tested for comedogenicity”
help make the job easier. Incorporating cosmetics in
acne treatment regimens supports the concept of the
dermatologist as the skin care expert.
REFERENCES
REFERENCES
1. Tombs EL. Cosmetics in the treatment of acne vulgaris.
IAA Consensus
Document
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Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol | January-February 2009 | Vol 75 | Supplement 1S56
Acne in India: Guidelines for management
Dermatol Clin 2005;23:575-81.
2. Poli F. Acne: Personal hygiene. Ann Dermatol Venereol
2003;130:50-2.
3. Savant SS. Personal care and cosmetic products. In: Textbook
of dermatosurgery and cosmetology. 2nd ed. Vol. 62. Mumbai:
ASCAD; 2005. p. 500-15.
4. Sheth RA. Cosmetics and cosmetic procedures. In: Valia RG,
Valia A, editors. IADVL Textbook and Atlas of Dermatology.
2nd ed. Mumbai: Bhalani Publishing House; 2001. p. 1313-
25.
[Downloaded free from http://www.ijdvl.com on Friday, May 06, 2016, IP: 59.99.179.27]
... Moreover, using exfoliators and scrubbing can also irritate the sebaceous gland and leads to trauma which worsens the condition of acne. 4 Information on diet and cosmetics influence the degree of acne vulgaris which is important for the management of the skin condition and education for the community to prevent and recover from the acne condition. Hence, this ...
... A study regarding the frequency of using exfoliators and the degree of acne vulgaris or occurrence of acne vulgaris should be done for a better understanding of the relation of exfoliator and acne vulgaris. 4 In this study, most of the respondents tended to avoid the frequent usage of decorative cosmetics as they only used decorative cosmetics on special occasions. This could be due to the common belief that decorative cosmetics are occlusive and can lead to cosmetic acne. ...
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Background: Acne vulgaris (AV) is a chronic inflammatory multifactorial disease that involves the pilosebaceous unit. The lesions of acne may be either non-inflammatory (comedones, which are blackheads or whiteheads) or inflammatory lesions (papules, nodules or pustules). The effects of diet and cosmetics on acne are still inconclusive. The objective of this study was to analyse the relationship between diet, cosmetics and the degree of AV. Methods: This was a hospital-based, analytic observational study with cross-sectional design. The subjects were patients from the Outpatient Clinic of Dermatovenereology Department of Dr. Soetomo General Hospital. The questionnaire was filled by the respondents and the degree of AV was graded by the specialist. Results: Among the types of diet, white bread (p=0.039), chocolate (p=0.044) and oily food (p=0.013) are significantly associated with the degree of AV. However, white rice, potatoes and milk were insignificantly related to degree of AV (p>0.05). No significant association was found in cosmetics (cleanser, moisturizer, facial protection, exfoliators and decorative cosmetics) with the degree of AV (p>0.05). Conclusions: The factors that have an influence on the degree of AV are white bread, chocolate and oily food intake.
... [39][40][41] El afeitado es un proceso que suele ser irritante debido a la interacción entre la piel y la navaja. 42 Para minimizar el traumatismo e irritación de la piel se recomienda lavar la cara para hidratar el vello y remover el sebo y las células descamadas en la piel y las aperturas foliculares, y aplicarse gel para afeitar que lubrique la zona de afeitado. 43 Al finalizar, debe aplicarse un emoliente. ...
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I Generalidades La piel funciona como barrera entre el cuerpo y el medio ambiente al prevenir la pérdida de líquidos y electrolitos, regular la temperatura corporal y proteger contra infecciones y diversos estímulos mecánicos, térmicos, y ambientales. Además, es esencial para el sentido del tacto y la síntesis de vitamina D.1-4En el niño la piel es frágil, delgada y más propensa a dermatitis e infecciones.2,5,6 Mientras que en el adolescente, la piel experimenta cambios secundarios al alza en los andrógenos circulantes, que se traducen en mayor producción de sebo y predisposición al acné.7
... Kairavee et al. concluded that washing the face with soap is an acne trigger (24). Many studies have reported that washing the face more than three times a day can exacerbate acne with a rebound effect due to irritation of the sebaceous glands (25,26). We also found that the xeromycteria risk increased 1.79 times in those that engaged in nasal irrigation with any liquid. ...
Full-text available
Article
Introduction: This questionnaire study evaluates dermatological complaints that may arise due to hygiene measures and anxiety among healthcare professionals (HCPs) during the COVID-19 outbreak. Methods: A total of 526 volunteers, consisting of doctors and nurses, participated. Demographic features, personal hygiene behavior, personal protective equipment (PPE) use, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (HADS-A) parameters, and symptoms of various dermatological diseases (xerosis, eczema, acne, hair loss, palmar hyperhidrosis, xeromycteria, urticaria, aphthous stomatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis) were investigated. Results: Although the frequency and severity of many dermatological complaints increased during the pandemic period, the most frequent increase was observed in the frequency of complaints suggesting xerosis and eczema. We found that complaints suggesting xerosis and eczema were seen on the hands 2.44 and 3.57 times, respectively, as a result of washing hands 10 times/day, and that handwashing times of 10 seconds or more significantly increased the risk of eczema (5.44 times). Another remarkable result was a fivefold increase in acne complaints among those using any mask. The severity of all complaints except hair loss and seborrheic dermatitis correlated significantly with HADS-A. Conclusions: Our study showed that the frequency and severity of some dermatological complaints increased in HCPs.
Chapter
Cosmetics and personal care products are mixtures of chemical compounds derived from natural or synthetic sources, employed to improve the appearance or odor of the human body. This set of products is very diverse: hair-coloring, hair-waving, and hair-straightening products; depilatories; hair sprays; shampoos and conditioners; lipsticks; nail care products; perfumes, colognes, toilet waters, and other fragrance products; bath preparations; moisturizing lotions and creams for the body, face, and hands; dental products; deodorants and antiperspirants; and others. This diverse set of products contains an even wider variety of ingredients. Although cosmetics are generally regarded as nontoxic under typical or intended conditions of use, some ingredients can play a role in human toxicity, depending on the extent and route of exposure. Because most of these products are applied topically, dermal exposure considerations are dominant. For some products, there is the potential for inhalation or incidental ingestion exposures. In this article, the authors will discuss toxicological considerations for the main cosmetic product categories and key ingredients under typical conditions of use. A summary of test methods and aspects of regulation and standards are also presented.
Article
This article describes scenarios of patients who have acne vulgaris have tried over-the-counter products and cosmetics and are disheartened by the persistence of their disease and the resulting scars. They may have seen an aesthetician, plastic surgeon, or even a general practitioner before seeing a well-informed skin specialist. Patients perceive the dermatologist to be the skin care expert and seek guidance to obtain otherwise unobtainable results. Therefore, practicing dermatologists should take advantage of the available tools to treat patients aggressively and completely. Appropriately applied cosmetics can play a role in achieving this goal. This article describes scenarios that integrate cosmetics into an anti-acne treatment regimen that is effective and safe for all ethnic groups and is well tolerated by both male and female patients.
Acne: Personal hygiene
  • F Poli
Poli F. Acne: Personal hygiene. Ann Dermatol Venereol 2003;130:50-2.
Cosmetics and cosmetic procedures
  • R A Sheth
Sheth RA. Cosmetics and cosmetic procedures. In: Valia RG, Valia A, editors. IADVL Textbook and Atlas of Dermatology. 2nd ed. Mumbai: Bhalani Publishing House; 2001. p. 1313-25.
Guidelines for management
  • India Acne In
Acne in India: Guidelines for management Dermatol Clin 2005;23:575-81.
Personal care and cosmetic products In: Textbook of dermatosurgery and cosmetology Mumbai: ASCAD
  • Ss Savant
Savant SS. Personal care and cosmetic products. In: Textbook of dermatosurgery and cosmetology. 2 nd ed. Vol. 62. Mumbai: ASCAD; 2005. p. 500-15.
Supplement 1 S56 Acne in India: Guidelines for management
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol | January-February 2009 | Vol 75 | Supplement 1 S56 Acne in India: Guidelines for management Dermatol Clin 2005;23:575-81.