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CHRONIC SLEEP DEPRIVATION AND ITS EFFECT ON THE LENGTH OF HUMAN TELOMERES: A REVIEW

Authors:
  • International Institute of Sleep Sciences

Abstract

Chronic Sleep deprivation has developed into a routine in today's rapidly growing world. Variety of factors including shift works, medical conditions, sleep disorders, household stress, domestic duties, social and work pressures, etc. are responsible for increased prevalence of Sleep restriction over extended periods and subject body to stress. It produces associated observable physiological and psychological changes. The present analysis has provided certain evidences suggesting that the chronic sleep deprivation as prolonged partial sleep restriction and accelerated telomere attrition are closely linked. Telomeres are the crucial targets for the effects of myriad factors influencing ageing and age related disorders. Telomeres are 'Biomarkers of Ageing' and the chronological age advancement is closely associated with these molecular structures. Newly emerging research in telomere biology highlights variety of stress factors with all culminating into accelerated telomere shortening. The present review summarizes the studies that have investigated chronic sleep deprivation as a major stress factor with effects of prolonged sleep loss on telomeres. A brief review of methodologies used to assess sleep and quantify Telomere Length (TL) is done to aid in postulating their feasibility, sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility to help standardize future research directions in this field.
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... Moreover, sleep deprivation connected with chronic diseases such as type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. 2,3,[6][7][8][9][10][11] Academic performance in university is a significant predictor of products. For instance, cumulative grade point average (GPA) forecasts upcoming financial success and traces psychosocial well-being. ...
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