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A change in how individuals consume energy is a key step in fighting climate change since it represents a crucial contribution to a more collective and sustainable lifestyle adoption. To carry out such process, designers and scientists are seeking new ways to increase public discussion and social involvement in energy reduction issues. In relation to this, the emphasis is on raising collective awareness to enable behavioural change and to inspire people in making sustainable decisions on energy consumption. This article draws on techniques and approaches from social science, gameful design and sustainability. It defines and discusses cooperative play as a privileged path for developing energy-related mobile applications. We present here an overview of multiple perspectives, in terms of content and methodology, to contribute to elaborating design methodologies that can favour behavioural change on households’ energy consumption.
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... By the use of gamification approach, information technologies support people towards various and beneficiary behaviours. The lens of gamification has been applied to sustainability in various fields (health, resources consumption, mobility) as it fits the purpose to change people's behaviour, increase environmental awareness [Castri et al., 2014] and motivate actions by creating positive pressure [Lee, 2013: 352]. Learning by playing involves change and occurs through experience. ...
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Design not only interacts with Territory, but it can also be one of the latter’s crucial transformation agents, due to the sizable and significant part it plays in the appreciation of local resources and contribution to identify and reveal the history, culture and predicates of communities where several of the products and services it projects are, in fact, generated. Regardless, Design’s role understandably pivots around the conceptual innovation and renovation of products, production procedures, communication strategies and overall services associated with general goods. Thus, its focus could actually be quite efficient when altering the perception which distinct agents from a certain value chain may nurture about the potential of very diverse territories, particularly through its ability to integrate different scopes of human activity, from agriculture to tourism, craftsmanship to science, gastronomy to the industry. Contemporary Design and the myriad of knowledge and values it encompasses may easily facilitate the dialogue, as well as integrate and explore multiple dimensions from historically underestimated individuals and communities, both locally and within more cosmopolitan spheres. Design changes people’s lives, alters routines, shifts expectations, opens markets and, most of all, has the ability to - through the thought and projectual action that defines its practices - connect production’s several dimensions with the ones from distribution and fruition, as much in a local as in a global scale, bestowing them with a cultural purport. Also, it is in concrete territories that transformation opportunities are created, through the development of actions and projects that are able to answer, from bottom up and in a participated manner, to the complex issues and restraints emerging from the operative social-economical models with an increasingly hegemonic propensity. Design can undoubtedly contribute to build alternatives there. On the other hand, the duo Design / Territory summons the topics from DESIGNA’s previous editions, particularly the ones concerned with Projectual Hope, un/Sustainability and Identity, although multimedia interfaces and the overall components from desire and lapse can also be easily reflected and detected in it.
... The two ways interaction is driven by the emerging E-mail address: yijararweh@just.edu.jo. techniques like demand-side management [19,32], smart metering [12], behind-the-meter energy management systems [1], and social media [10]. In addition, the extended customer engagement within the energy framework opens new frontiers for new services and products where customers are the main actors of these new services and products in residential areas [26]. ...
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... PowerPedia is an illustrative example of an application designed to better understand the energy usage metrics and to identify the energy consumption of different domestic appliances [107]. Peer-to-peer comparative approach and the social dimension is another strategy that directly correlates with existing social media initiatives [108]. In this regard, Petkov el Al. presented EnergyWiz [109], a mobile application that enables comparative feedback supported by a community where participants can compare themselves with the rest of the users. ...
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Energy-efficiency related research has reached a growing interest in recent years due to the imminent scarcity of non-renewable resources in our environment and the impending impacts their usage have on our environment. Thus, facing the reduction of energy waste and management has become a pivotal issue in our society. To cope with energy inefficiency, the scientific research community has identified the promotion of people’s behaviour change as a critical field to foster environmental sustainability. However, the body of literature shows a lack of systematic methods and processes to reach a common ground when designing technology for promoting sustainable behaviour change. Therefore, this paper contributes with a thorough review and analysis of state of the art. Firstly, theoretical works related to behaviour change are collected and studied to clarify their main concepts and theories. Secondly, the different technologies, processes, methods and techniques applied in the field are reviewed to find diverse strategies in the application of the previously explained theoretical domains. Moreover, a wide range of systems developed to improve energy efficiency through human behaviour change is analysed (from augmented objects to the Internet of Things, digital applications or websites). Finally, the detected research gaps are listed to guide future research when aiming to raise the awareness of individuals through Information and Communication Technologies.
... We agree with Castri et al. (2014) that, as schools are a natural extension of a community, an intervention in a school may have ripple effects in the community. Following the lead of Frederiks et al. (2016), we used a standardised delivery method with valid measures and a clearly defined target group. ...
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South African schools are finding electricity costly in terms of money that could be spent on the primary purpose of educating children, but they tend not to be proactive about these costs. Managing the monthly bills is a huge task: the usage numbers on the bill are incomprehensible, the time-of-use tariff structure is bewilderingly complex, and the person who deals with payments is usually an overburdened teacher. This paper describes a controlled behavioural experiment carried out at five schools in Stellenbosch. We provided highly visualised and intuitive daily, weekly and monthly reports to three of the schools, the other two acting as controls. The reports were shared with teachers, principals and the governing body to encourage accountability. Usage was shown as a colour-coded energy and financial component per hour and per tariff class. Using the difference-in-differences method, we found financial savings of 11% and 14% at two of the schools and 13% at the third school, where staff were also trained on the tariff structure before reporting started. These results suggest that sharing high-frequency, digestible information could help South African schools reduce their energy bills; a saving that has particular relevance given the country’s dependence on fossil fuels.
... We agree with Castri et al. (2014) that, as schools are a natural extension of a community, an intervention in a school may have ripple effects in the community. Following the lead of Frederiks et al. (2016), we used a standardised delivery method with valid measures and a clearly defined target group. ...
Article
Full-text available
South African schools are finding electricity costly in terms of money that could be spent on the primary purpose of educating children, but they tend not to be proactive about these costs. Managing the monthly bills is a huge task: the usage numbers on the bill are incomprehensible, the time-of-use tariff structure is bewilderingly complex, and the person who deals with payments is usually an overburdened teacher. This paper describes a controlled behavioural experiment carried out at five schools in Stellenbosch. We provided highly visualised and intuitive daily, weekly and monthly reports to three of the schools, the other two acting as controls. The reports were shared with teachers, principals and the governing body to encourage accountability. Usage was shown as a colour-coded energy and financial component per hour and per tariff class. Using the difference-in-differences method, we found financial savings of 11% and 14% at two of the schools and 13% at the third school, where staff were also trained on the tariff structure before reporting started. These results suggest that sharing high-frequency, digestible information could help South African schools reduce their energy bills; a saving that has particular relevance given the country’s dependence on fossil fuels.
... By the use of gamification approach, information technologies support people towards various and beneficiary behaviours. The lens of gamification has been applied to sustainability in various fields (health, resources consumption, mobility) as it fits the purpose to change people's behaviour, increase environmental awareness [Castri et al., 2014] and motivate actions by creating positive pressure [Lee, 2013: 352]. Learning by playing involves change and occurs through experience. ...
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Our environment evolves in relation to changes in lifestyle, consumption and production behaviors, and with the evolution in communication and interaction interfaces. Interactive technologies play an important part in this change working as personal devices, social and communication platforms, and also as networked sensors systems. Among the main emerging trends are Internet of Things (IoT) and Gamification, which constitute in fact the latest trends for interacting with reality and at the same time learning from the environment through an increasingly participatory experience. While this technical progress is fast, changes in nature are slower though sometimes irreversible. The development of the achievable scenarios for ecological and economical sustainability lacks in design approaches for the promotion at large scale of an ecological mindset. This paper positions its findings on a participatory design mind-set that acts as a key to fostering a more sustainable world. There is the need to integrate the ecological perspective as active part of the Design discussion and to bridge the communication among actors involved, people, interfaces and territory, in a more reciprocal way. This paper could provide insights and suggestions for the most effective use of reality-based interaction design in future research. By the review of case studies from different sectors, the article illustrates the current models of user’s engagement offering an overview of design features, revealed dimensions, as well as gaps for multidisciplinary design integrations. The innovative models offer several opportunities to: engage people into the design discussion, stimulate more active approaches and increase the awareness on both local and global changes.
... Finally is quantified the effect of peer pressure (pp) that a community has on the flexibility ( according to the definition of Section 3A) of a peer . Based on relevant field trials [11][12] [23][24], we assume that the peer pressure impact is quantified as a reduction of the flexibility parameter (increase in flexibility) from the a priori value to an a posteriori (after the peer pressure) value of given by: ...
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... The use of gamification in typically non-game environments, with the additional connection to real-world data that make one's own behavior more tangible, can encourage participation in public issues, enhance problem solving, and improve the understanding of our behavior (Lee et al. 2013;Thiel and Fröhlich 2017). Gamified technologies leverage on the intrinsic enjoyment of play through mastering skills or a sense of accomplishment to increase the player's motivation and engagement in an activity context of well-defined and significant purpose (e.g., mobility choice or energy use), thus being meaningful and effective in stimulating behavior change (Castri et al. 2014;Cellina et al. 2016;Deci and Ryan 1985;Hamari et al. 2014;Malone and Lepper 1987). Reaching a level of engagement to prompt actual behavior change is however closely dependent on the framing and the motivational setting of playful contexts (Amory and Seagram 2013). ...
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