Article

An Investigation into the Benefits of the Proudly South African Campaign to the Small, Medium and Micro Enterprise sector

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Abstract

The “Proudly South African ” (PSA) campaign is currently very topical, having become a visible brand in its own right in the space of a year and a half since launch, with the primary objective of creating job employment. Requirements for a company to belong to, and use the PSA endorsement, include having at least 50 % local content- whether service or product, quality of a high standard, fair labour practice and environmental responsibility. The aim of this research initiative is an investigation of the benefits of the PSA campaign to the small, medium and micro enterprises (SMME’s) and how PSA functions as a brand endorser for member firms in this business sector. The research also set out to ascertain the reasons for firms joining PSA, what they hoped to gain from their membership, and whether these benefits have been realised. This resulted in providing a recommendation to PSA for improving their service to SMME’s and helping them to best leverage the PSA endorsement. Findings show an overwhelming sense of patriotism from this sector, which prompted their membership. Benefits have not resulted in sales, as yet, however there has been an increase in prestige and perception of the organisations which belong to PSA. A large portion of the SMME base are very new members, having joined after July 2003, and thus it will take time for real growth due to the PSA affiliation to be realised.

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Includes: • Benchmarking analyzing similar campaigns from around the world -Australia -"Australian Made" campaign (AMC) -USA -"Made in USA" -Malaysia -Domestic Campaign "Buatan Malaysia" and International "Made in Malaysia
The "Proudly South African Campaign" Research Databook, Kaiser Associates (March 2001). Includes: • Benchmarking analyzing similar campaigns from around the world -Australia -"Australian Made" campaign (AMC) -USA -"Made in USA" -Malaysia -Domestic Campaign "Buatan Malaysia" and International "Made in Malaysia" -New Zealand -"Buy New Zealand Made" -India -"India Brand Equity Fund" (IBEF) -Italy -"Italian Trade Commission" (ITC)
Proudly South African" Campaign Task Team Recommendation
"Proudly South African" Campaign Task Team Recommendation, PSA, January (2001)
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