Article

THE EVOLUTION OF THE SHADOW

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

The term shadow refers to that part of the personality which has been repressed for the sake of the ego ideal. Since everything unconscious is projected, we encounter the shadow in projection—in our view of "the other fellow." As a figure in dreams or fantasies the shadow represents the personal unconscious. It is like a composite of the personal shells of our complexes and is thus the doorway to all deeper transpersonal experiences. Practically speaking, the shadow more often than not appears as an inferior personality. However, there can also be a positive shadow, which appears when we tend to identify with our negative qualities and repress the positive ones. The following example of the shadow is a classical one from a familiar situation. A middle-aged patient complains repeatedly and bitterly about her mother-in-law. Her description seems by and large to be correct and adequate, for her husband, independently of his wife, has provided a description which is practically identical. Mother is seen by both as utterly domineering, never able to admit another person's viewpoint, in the habit of asking for advice and at once deprecating it, always feeling at a disadvantage, abused, martyred and, as a result of all this, almost impossible to reach. Our analysand, the daughter-in-law, feels that her mother-in-law stands between her and her husband; the son must constantly serve his mother, and the wife consequently feels eclipsed. Her marital situation seems to be in a hopeless impasse. She has the following dream: I am in a dark hallway. I attempt to reach my husband, but my way is barred by my mother-in-law. What is most frightening, however, is that my mother-in-law cannot sec me, even though a spotlight shines brightly upon me. It is as if I did not exist at all as far as she is concerned.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

... Part of this rejection can be projected on to others, making them ''carry'' the unlived elements (Storr, 1999, p. xv). Whitmont (1969Whitmont ( /1991) describes the shadow as consisting of ''complexes, of personal qualities resting on behaviour patterns which are a definite 'dark' part of the personality structure. In most instances they are readily observable by others. ...
... Part of this rejection can be projected on to others, making them ''carry'' the unlived elements (Storr, 1999, p. xv). Whitmont (1969Whitmont ( /1991) describes the shadow as consisting of ''complexes, of personal qualities resting on behaviour patterns which are a definite 'dark' part of the personality structure. In most instances they are readily observable by others. ...
Article
Full-text available
The paper suggests that public-relations (PR) ethics might benefit from the ideas of Carl Jung (1875–1961), suggesting wholeness instead of goodness as an ethical foundation. PR ethics are located in professional ethics, highlighting problems with idealized self-images. The possibilities of a Jungian ethic are then explored, with emphasis on the integration of shadow material. Finally, these ideas are tentatively applied to public relations, asking whether the dominance of the Excellent Persona has fueled the shadow of deceit and manipulation. The paper is written from a hermeneutic perspective, viewing professional ethics through a Jungian lens.
... Part of this rejection can be projected on to others, making them ''carry'' the unlived elements (Storr, 1999, p. xv). Whitmont (1969Whitmont ( /1991) describes the shadow as consisting of ''complexes, of personal qualities resting on behaviour patterns which are a definite 'dark' part of the personality structure. In most instances they are readily observable by others. ...
... Part of this rejection can be projected on to others, making them ''carry'' the unlived elements (Storr, 1999, p. xv). Whitmont (1969Whitmont ( /1991) describes the shadow as consisting of ''complexes, of personal qualities resting on behaviour patterns which are a definite 'dark' part of the personality structure. In most instances they are readily observable by others. ...
Book
Do professions really place duty to society above clients' or their own interests? If not, how can they be trusted? While some public relations (PR) scholars claim that PR serves society and enhances the democratic process, others suggest that it is little more than propaganda, serving the interests of global corporations. This is not an argument about definitions, but about ethics - yet this topic is barely explored in texts and theories that seek to explain PR and its function in society. This book places PR ethics in the wider context of professional ethics and the sociology of professions. By bringing together literature from fields beyond public relations - sociology, professional and philosophical ethics, and Jungian psychology - it integrates a new body of ideas into the debate. The unprecedented introduction of Jungian psychology to public relations scholarship shifts the debate beyond a traditional Western 'Good/Bad' ethical dichotomy towards a new holistic approach, with dynamic implications for theory and practice. This thought-provoking book will be essential reading for students, academics and professionals with an interest in public relations, ethics and professionalism.
Chapter
In this chapter, I adopt the work of Carl Jung to explain the affective dimensions of mythology and its psychological foundations. Through Jung’s model of the human psyche, I discuss his concept of archetypes and the collective unconscious. Here, I will discuss the transpersonal dynamics that help to explain the oscillation that occurs between non-representational and representational aspects of consciousness, mythology, and ideology. In doing so, I propose affective apparatus as the most substantive term for encompassing the entire psycho-discursive dimensions, language formations, and social expressions of mythology. This approach enriches the scope of DMA and provides us with a psycho-discursive synergy that other discursive frameworks previously lacked.
Article
This article uses the Jungian concepts of the shadow and shadow projection to illuminate racism. It argues that racism is one form of shadow projection. Racism and shadow projection have deleterious effects on both the targets and the perpetrators of projection. For the targets of projection, psychotherapy involves empathic understanding of the effects of racism and client empowerment. For the perpetrators of projection, psychotherapy involves exploration, acceptance, and monitoring their shadow side. This article suggests that training for therapists also include awareness of the shadow. Such awareness would support therapists' comfort with clients of different cultural backgrounds. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.