ArticlePDF Available

The remarkable parallel between Rogers’ core conditions and Adler’s social interest.

Authors:

Abstract

This article demonstrates the remarkable similarity between Adler's social interest and Rogers' therapist-offered core conditions.
... Both approaches are targeted towards self-understanding, self-knowledge and self-evaluation. Thus the client/patient is the driver of the psychotherapeutic session, towards the direction of his/her choice, towards a meaningful (for him/her) destination (self-actualization); the role of the psychotherapist is ether to implement the 6 therapeutic conditions (PCA- Rogers, 1957) and/or proceed with the Socratic Method (Watts, 1998). Indeed Watts makes a strong case of the similarity of the 6 core conditions to Adler's social interest, especially with regards to the role of the therapist (Watts, 1998). ...
... Thus the client/patient is the driver of the psychotherapeutic session, towards the direction of his/her choice, towards a meaningful (for him/her) destination (self-actualization); the role of the psychotherapist is ether to implement the 6 therapeutic conditions (PCA- Rogers, 1957) and/or proceed with the Socratic Method (Watts, 1998). Indeed Watts makes a strong case of the similarity of the 6 core conditions to Adler's social interest, especially with regards to the role of the therapist (Watts, 1998). As a result both approaches are based on cooperation, respect, empathy, encouragement and real care towards the client/patient. ...
... Adlerian therapists focus on developing a respectful, egalitarian, optimistic, and growth-oriented therapeutic alliance that emphasizes clients' assets, abilities, resources, and strengths. Watts (1998) noted that Adler's descriptions of therapist-modeled social interest look very similar to Rogers's descriptions of the core facilitative conditions of client change: congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathic understanding. Those qualities and characteristics of the therapeutic alliance are embedded in what Adlerians have historically called encouragement, or the therapeutic modeling of social interest (Mosak & Maniacci, 1999;Watts, 1998;Watts & Pietrzak, 2000). ...
... Watts (1998) noted that Adler's descriptions of therapist-modeled social interest look very similar to Rogers's descriptions of the core facilitative conditions of client change: congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathic understanding. Those qualities and characteristics of the therapeutic alliance are embedded in what Adlerians have historically called encouragement, or the therapeutic modeling of social interest (Mosak & Maniacci, 1999;Watts, 1998;Watts & Pietrzak, 2000). Stressing the importance of encouragement in therapy, Adler (1956) stated: "Altogether, in every step of the treatment, we must not deviate from the path of encouragement" (p. ...
Article
Full-text available
The contemporary relevance of Adler’s thinking is evident in many streams of contemporary psychological thinking, including positive psychology. This article demonstrates the enormous common ground between Adler’s mature theoretical ideas and the positive psychology movement and argues for Adler’s acknowledgment as the original positive psychology. Key words: Alfred Adler, Adlerian psychology, Positive Psychology, Gemeinschaftsgefuhl, Striving for Perfection/Superiority.
... For Adlerians, a strong counselor-client relationship is usually developed when counselors model social interest. According to Watts (1998), Adler's descriptions of therapist-modeled social interest look very similar to Rogers's descriptions of the core facilitative conditions of client change: congruence, empathic understanding, and unconditional positive regard. Furthermore, Mosak (1979) discusses the counselor-client relationship in terms of "faith, hope, and love" (p. ...
... Because psychotherapy occurs in a relational context, Adlerian therapists focus on developing a respectful, collaborative, and egalitarian therapeutic alliance with clients. Therapeutic efficacy in other phases of Adlerian therapy-analysis, insight, and reorientation-is predicated on the development and continuation of a strong therapeutic relationship (Mosak, 1979(Mosak, , 1995Watts, 1998Watts, , 1999Watts, , 2000Watts, , 2003aWatts & Pietrzak, 2000;Watts & Shulman, 2003). ...
... Adlerian therapists focus on developing a respectful, egalitarian, optimistic, and growth-oriented therapeutic alliance that emphasizes clients' assets, abilities, resources and strengths. Watts (1998) noted that Adler's descriptions of therapistmodeled social interest look very similar to Rogers's descriptions of the core facilitative conditions of client change; congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathic understanding. The above qualities and characteristics of the therapeutic alliance are embedded in what Adlerians have historically called encouragement, or the therapeutic modeling of social interest (Mosak & Maniacci, 1999;Watts, 1998;Watts & Pietrzak, 2000). ...
... Watts (1998) noted that Adler's descriptions of therapistmodeled social interest look very similar to Rogers's descriptions of the core facilitative conditions of client change; congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathic understanding. The above qualities and characteristics of the therapeutic alliance are embedded in what Adlerians have historically called encouragement, or the therapeutic modeling of social interest (Mosak & Maniacci, 1999;Watts, 1998;Watts & Pietrzak, 2000). Stressing the importance of encouragement in therapy, Adler (1956) stated: "Altogether, in every step of the treatment, we must not deviate from the path of encouragement" (p. ...
Article
Full-text available
In addressing foundational perspectives, proponents of the current positive psychology movement typically identify Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and Gordon Allport as precursors and ancestors. This article demonstrates that the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler preceded the aforementioned ancestors of positive psychology and could be viewed as the original positive psychology. Following a brief overview of key ideas from Adler’s Individual Psychology, the authors specifically address two foundational tenets of Adler’s theory that particularly resonate with those from positive psychology and then address more broadly the remarkable common ground between Adler’s mature theoretical ideas and the positive psychology movement.
... be the counselor-client relationship are also used in the Adlerian literature (e.g., Ansbacher & Ansbacher, 1956; Dreikurs, 1967; Dinkmeyer, Dinkmeyer, & Sperry, 1987; Mosak, 1979; Sweeney, 1998; Watt,>, 1999; Watts & Pietrzak, 2000). For Adlerians, a strong counselor-client relationship is usually developed when counsel­ ors model social interest. Watts (1998) noted that Adler's descriptions of therapist-modeled social interest look very similar to Carl Rogers's descriptions of the core facilitative conditions of client change: congru­ ence, unconditional positive regard, and empathic understanding. Fur­ thermore, Mosak (1979) discusses the counselor-client relationship in terms of "faith, ho ...
... Because psychotherapy occurs in a relational context, Adlerian thera­ pists focus on developing a respectful, collaborative, and egalitarian therapeutic alliance with clients. Therapeutic efficacy in other phases of Adlerian therapy is predicated upon the development and continua­ tion of a strong therapeutic relationship (Watts, 1998Watts, , 2000 Watts & Pietrzak,2000). ...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter discusses the significant common ground between Adlerian and constructivist therapies, and suggests aspects from each perspective that may be usefully integrated into the other,
... For Adlerians, a strong counselor­ client relationship is usually developed when counselors model social interest. Watts (1998) noted that Adler's descriptions of thera­ pist-modeled social interest look very similar to Rogers's descrip­ ~~-----~-tions of the core facilitative conditions of client change: congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathic understanding. Furthermore, Mosak (1979) discusses the counselor-client relation­ ship in terms of "faith, hope, and love" (p. ...
... and egalitarian therapeutic alliance with clients. Therapeutic efficacy in other phases of Adlerian therapy-analysis, inSight, and reorientation-is predicated upon the development and continuation of a strong therapeutic relation­ ship (Watts, 1998, Watts, 2000Watts, 2003;Watts & Pietrzak, 2000;Watts & Shulman, 2003) . ...
... The valuable interdisciplinary contributions of Alfred Adler's precursory postmodern theory can be seen in the work of such individuals as Glasser, Rogers, Ellis, Frankl, Maslow and Hawes (Mosak, 1995; Watts, 1998; Watts & Pietrzak, 2000). Education, however, was ...
Article
Full-text available
I work in literacy education, encouraging teacher candidates to experiment with the arts to make a novel come alive for adolescent readers. Part of my research agenda, which is intertwined with my teaching, seeks to make sense of the question: What are the effects of arts-based learning on the teacher candidates’ theoretical and classroom practices? To first consider the above research question from my own pedagogical perspective, I draw on my earlier recollections (Adler, 1958) of arts and classroom living using the methodology of narrative inquiry—the study of the ways humans experience the world via the construction and reconstruction of their own stories (Connelly & Clandinin, 1990). Informed by my teaching narrative, crafted in the backdrop of remembered times, I venture forth to address the effects of arts-based learning on the teacher candidates’ theoretical and classroom practices. A more informed construction of our recurring narratives, rekindled by the illumination of early recollections, will play an integral role.
... Many con sider Adler's influence on the development of other theories as his most '~important contribution to the field of counseling and psychotherapy (Corey, 1996). Adler's influence has been acknowledged and/or his vision traced to neo-Freudian approaches (e.g., Ansbacher & Ansbacher, 1979;Ellenberger, 1970), existential therapy (e.g., Frankl, 1963Frankl, , 1970May, 1970May, , 1989, person-centered therapy (e.g., Ansbacher, 1990;Watts, 1998), rational-emotive therapy (e.g., Dryden & Ellis, 1987;Ellis, 1970Ellis, , 1973Ellis, , 1989, cognitive therapy (e.g., Beck, 1976;Beck & Weishaar, 1989;Dowd & Kelly, 1980;Freeman, 1981Freeman, , 1993Freeman & Urschel, 1997;Raimy, 1975;Sperry, 1997), reality therapy (e.g., Glasser, 1984;Whitehouse, 1984;Wubbolding, 1993), family systems approaches (e.g., Broderick & Schrader, 1991;Carich & Willingham, 1987;Kern, Hawes, & Christensen, 1989;Nichols & Schwartz, 1995;Sherman, 1999;Sherman & Dinkmeyer, 1987), and constructivist and social construc tionist perspectives (Carlson & Sperry, 1998;Disque & Bitter, 1998;Jones, 1995;Jones & Lyddon, 1997;Lafountain & Garner, 1998,2002Mahoney, 2002aMahoney, , 2002bMaster, 1991;Schneider & Stone, 1998;Scott. Kelly. ...
... Adlerian therapists focus on developing a respectful, egalitarian, optimistic, and growth-oriented therapeutic alliance that emphasizes clients' assets, abilities, resources, and strengths. Watts (1998) noted that Adler's descriptions of therapist-modeled social interest look very similar to Rogers's descriptions of the core facilitative conditions of client change: congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathic understanding. The above qualities and characteristics of the therapeutic alliance are embedded in what Adlerians have historically called encouragement, or the therapeutic modeling of social interest (carlson, Watts, & Maniacci, 2006;Mosak and Maniacci, 1999). ...
Article
Full-text available
Alfred Adler died in 1937 having created a personality theory and approach to counseling so far ahead of his time that many contemporary approaches have “discovered” many of Adler 's fundamental conclusions, often without recognition of his vision and influence. Many students, educators, and practitioners may view the Adlerian approach as an antiquated model; that is, one having limited utility in contemporary practice. This paper briefly overviews some fundamental tenets of Adlerian counseling and psychotherapy and discusses the contemporary viability of the approach.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.