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Anomuran and brachyuran crab symbionts of Singapore hard corals of the families Acroporidae, Agariciidae and Pocilloporidae

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Anomuran and brachyuran crab symbionts from 51 colonies of corals belonging to the families Acroporidae, Agariciidae and Pocilloporidae were investigated. A total of seven species of anomurans and 27 species of brachyurans were collected, of which the majority were corallophilous symbionts. Comparisons with studies made at four oceanic reefs revealed a paucity of brachyuran corallicolous symbionts, with only four species of Anomura and four species of Brachyura observed in Singapore. However, there was a high abundance of corallophilous and casual symbionts in Singapore.
... General aspects of the ecology of Tetralia, together with other symbionts and associates of corals, were reviewed by Castro (1976), Patton (1976), and Stella et al. (2011). Species richness and host distribution of Tetralia were studied by Patton (1966Patton ( , 1994, Ribes (1978), Goh et al. (1990), , Sin (1999), and Vytopil & Willis (2001). Sin (1999) suggested that Tetralia in Queensland, Australia, including colour morphs of one species, select particular coral host species. ...
... CYMO Cymo (Xanthidae: Cymoinae: eight species [Ho & Ng, 2005; Chapter 71-18 in this volume]) is regularly collected from live acroporid, pocilloporid, and other zooxanthellate (hermatypic) scleractinian corals across the Indo-West Pacific (Garth, 1964(Garth, , 1974b(Garth, , 1984Patton, 1966Patton, , 1974Patton, , 1994Austin et al., 1980;Black & Prince, 1983;Nakasone et al., 1986;Chang et al., 1987;Goh et al., 1990, Tsuchiya & Yonaha, 1992Tsuchiya, 1999;Marin & Spiridonov, 2007;Brösing et al., 2014). There does not seem to be a narrow host specificity, species of the crab genus having been recorded from corals belonging to several families (Serène, 1984), as well as from dead corals (Patton, 1974;Brösing et al., 2014). ...
... OTHER XANTHOIDEA Numerous species of Chlorodiella, Cyclodius, Etisus, Liomera, Pilodius, and Pseudoliomera (Xanthidae: Actaeinae, Chlorodiellinae, Etisinae, and Liomerinae) have been recorded as "associates" or "commensals" of live zooxanthellate (hermatypic) scleractinian corals (Garth, 1964(Garth, , 1974b(Garth, , 1984(Garth, , 1989Barry, 1965;Austin et al., 1980;Edwards & Emberton, 1980;Black & Prince, 1983;Nakasone et al., 1986;Goh et al., 1990). Barry (1965) found coral fragments and mucus in the stomach of Pseudoliomera speciosa (as Actaea speciosa) from live Pocillopora in the Hawaiian Islands but little is known about the biology of this and other xanthids associated with corals. ...
... For the Pilumninae, many taxa are commonly found at the base of live corals, with some authors terming them corallophilous symbionts; whether they are actually commensals is not known. For example, Goh et al. (1990) documented Actumnus elegans De Man, 1887, Nanopilumnus barbatus (A. Milne-Edwards, 1873, Glabropilumnus edamensis (De Man, 1888) and Pilumnus spinifrons Ng & Tan, 1984, from the live scleractinian corals belonging to Acroporidae, Agariciidae, and Pocilloporidae in Singapore. ...
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A new genus and new species of pilumnid crab, Ericiolumnus symbioticus (Decapoda: Brachyura), is described from the sponge Callyspongia Duchassaing & Michelotti, 1864 (Porifera: Callyspongiidae) in reefs in Lombok, Indonesia. The new taxon is characterized, among several characters, by the unusual shape of the carapace, which possesses sharp anterolateral teeth armed with secondary spinules, and prominently spinulous ambulatory legs. Another pilumnid, Pseudactumnus pestaeBalss, 1933, is shown to be a junior synonym of Actumnus asper (Rüppell, 1830). The pilumnid genus PseudactumnusBalss, 1933 is additionally synonymised with ActumnusDana, 1851. A review of symbiosis in Pilumnidae is also presented.
... Mobile epifauna were collected from their host corals following Goh, Chou, and Ng (1989)) five months after nursery-rearing in December 2016. Each fragment was removed from the nursery and immediately sealed in a zipper bag to prevent the epifauna from escaping before bringing the samples to the research vessel. ...
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... There have been no comprehensive studies of soft corals undertaken in the reefs around the Southern Islands of Singapore and very little is known about their diversity and distribution. Although much information has been gathered on coral reefs in Singapore, these studies have not given much attention to soft corals, but rather have focused on other reef organisms, particularly hard corals (Chou and Teo, 1983;Chong, 1985;Chong, 1986;Chou, 1988;Goh et al., 1990;Chua, 1990;Goh and Chou, 1991;Low and Chou, 1991;Low and Chou, 1992;Leng and Lim, 1992;Goh and Chou, 1993;Chou et al., 1994a). A total of 197 hard corals species from 55 genera have been recorded here, accounting for almost 25% of the global total (Chou et al., 1994a;Chou and Goh, 1998;Tan et al., 2007). ...
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