Thesis

Sicomines – das 6,5 Milliarden US$ Abkommen als Ausdruck der Intensivierung chinesischen Engagements in der Demokratischen Republik Kongo – mutual benefit und win-win co-operation?

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Abstract

Die nachfolgende Arbeit analysiert das 2007 unterzeichnete, Rohmineralien-für-Infrastruktur „Sino-Congolais des Mines“ (Sicomines) Abkommen, zwischen der Demokratischen Republik Kongo und China. Im Zuge dessen werden die Motive der handelnden AkteurInnen, die Dynamiken in der Phase der Nachverhandlungen des Abkommens von 2007-2009, sowie die Inhalte des Abkommens eingehender beleuchtet. Zudem stellt die historische Komponente sowie die von den OECD Staaten differierende Ausrichtung des chinesischen Engagements in den Staaten des Südens einen wichtigen Bestandteil bei der Betrachtung dar. Als wichtiger Geberstaat und Rohstoffimporteur in Subsahara-Afrika und dem damit einhergehenden zunehmenden Einfluss als globaler Akteur, wird die in der letzten Dekade rasant gestiegene chinesische Aktivität auf dem afrikanischen Kontinent unterstrichen und ihre strategische Ausrichtung thematisiert. Weiters werden die im Zuge des Sicomines Abkommens ausgehandelten Infrastrukturprojekte betreffend ihrer Nachhaltigkeit und Nutzen für die DRK untersucht und der Frage nachgegangen, inwiefern die vertragliche Übereinkunft dem Konzept von mutual benefit beziehungsweise win-win co-operation gerecht wird.

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