Facebook versus email

ArticleinBritish Journal of Educational Technology 41(5) · September 2010with 16 Reads
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Abstract
University-level students are among the most vigorous adopters of social networking sites, with the 2008 US-based Educause Center for Applied Research (ECAR) study reporting that 85% of students use them on a daily basis. Email supports formal and informal communication equally well as it allows one-off or regular contact between correspondents. Social networking sites, on the other hand, typically require the creation of a network, or the incorporation of a user into an existing network before communication can take place. While the overall use of webmail and social networking tools remained relatively steady, with one or the other being used in around 60% of the sessions, by 2009, students' sessions were more likely to involve social networking sites alone than in combination with webmail.

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