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Oral radiology Part 2: Image interpretation

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... 3 The etiology of gemination is unknown; 4 however, there is some evidence that the condition has a familial tendency. 5 Evaluation of the fusion and gemination is very important to the dentist. One should pay attention while considering root canal treatment for fused canals especially if they are associated with bending roots. ...
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Fusion and gemination are rare occurrences in the mandibular posterior teeth. Different treatment methods can be used according to the situation. The purpose of this case report is to show surgical treatment of these teeth and to prove the exact dental anomaly by examining them histologically. A report of two cases of fused and geminated teeth are presented. The first case was an 42 year old male referred with the complaining of pain originated from the right mandibular third molar fused with a supernumerary tooth. The second case was an 23 year old male having pain in the left mandibular third molar with bifid crown. Both teeth were extracted surgically and then cut perpendicular to their long axis to investigate to name the type of the anomaly. The histological examination revealed fusion of cementum between the mandibular third molar and supernumerary fourth molar which is diagnostic for fusion of these teeth in case 1. In case 2, it was observed that the teeth were sharing same pulp chamber which is describing gemination of these teeth. We believe that diagnosing the condition will facilitate endodontic, prosthodontic, periodontic, orthodontic and surgical treatment of such teeth.
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The purpose of this study was to address the prevalence of dental fusion and gemination in a sample of Jordanian dental patients. Frequency distributions of these conditions among different types of teeth are also presented. The data were collected from examination of radiographs from a random sample of periapical films. In all, 9,373 teeth from 1,660 dental records at the Faculty of Dentistry, Irbid, Jordan, were evaluated. A tooth was recorded having gemination if its crown was enlarged with a normal root and the tooth count was normal. A tooth was recorded fused if the tooth crown and root were enlarged and the tooth count revealed a missing tooth. Fusion and gemination were detected in 18 and 21 teeth, respectively, with prevalence of 0.19% and 0.22%, respectively. Therefore, double teeth were found in 39 teeth with a prevalence of 0.42%. Maxillary central incisors Were the most commonly affected (3.6%), followed by mandibular third molars (0.9%). Fusion and gemination are uncommon conditions, but they are important dental anomalies that could affect any tooth in the mouth. Recognizing the condition will facilitate the endodontic, prosthodontic, periodontic, orthodontic, and surgical clinical management of such teeth.
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