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New security challenges: Broadening the Pugwash agenda?

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Abstract

Building on the legacy of the Russell-Einstein Manifesto and the success of the Pugwash Movement, this paper reflects on the nature of contemporary threats to human security and its implications to the agenda of Pugwash. On the basis of recent conceptual developments in the field of conflict studies and significant changes in current policy practice in the field of ‘peace & conflict’, this article puts the risks emanating from armament and especially weapons of mass destruction into a larger framework of human security and human development. It argues that contemporary security and conflict analysis especially tends to emphasize the importance of non-military factors and processes in causing and escalating lethal conflict. The article explores the implications of these observations for the Pugwash agenda and how to do justice to the fundamental questions arising from these recent developments in the framework of Pugwash’s agenda and interests.

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