Conference Paper

The "Kibaran Belt" of central Africa: what's in a name?

Authors:
  • Fortescue Metals Group
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... From oldest to youngest, the West Congo Supergroup ( Fig. 2A) is divided into the rift-related Zadinian (siliciclastic sediments overlain by tholeiitic basalts; 1000-920 Ma) and Mayumbian (felsic volcano-plutonic complex; 920-910 Ma) groups. The tholeiitic basalts and overlying felsic rocks mark a typical bimodal (sub)surface assemblage, which is itself overlain by the sedimentary West Congolian Group (910-566 Ma;Frimmel et al., 2006;Tack et al., 2001Tack et al., , 2011. The latter is subdivided into four subgroups (Delhaye and Sluys, 1923;Lepersonne, 1951Lepersonne, , 1974Cahen, 1978). ...
Article
In the Lower Congo region, the Ediacaran Schisto-Calcaire Subgroup consists of five carbonate-dominated formations (C1 to C5). They record tectono-eustatic sea-level fluctuations controlled by several short-time extensional tectonic events occurred in the whole basin, followed by the development of the Araçuaï-West Congo Orogen between 630 Ma and 560 Ma. The uppermost units of the C2 Formation, i.e. C2d and C2e members, consist of open marine to peritidal/sabkha cycles of 1 m to 4 m in thickness formed during in a Highstand Systems Tract (HST). The unexposed transition between the C2 and C3 formations is interpreted as a ‘final’ HSTphase which initiated the burial of the carbonate ramp by prograding siliciclastics or an early Transgressive Systems Tract (TST) phase. The carbonates of the C3 Formation represent open marine shallowing-upward cycles of 3 m to 8 m in thickness, with deposition at the top of massive oolitic barrier shoals during a TST which flooded the entire the Neoproterozoic West Congo Basin. During the highstand, contributions of river water and land-derived material inputs occured, intermittently according to the semi-arid to arid conditions that prevailed in the restricted inner ramp and in the sabkha facies belts.
... 3.3.1.1 The Sangha-Comba-Lower-Congo basins, DRC ( Fig. 3.2A) Lithostratigraphically, the West Congo Supergroup (Fig. 3.2B) is divided into, from oldest to youngest, the rift-related volcanoclastic 999 AE 7 Ma Zadinian and vol- cano-sedimentary AE 910 Ma Mayumbian groups deposited on a AE 2.1 Ga polymetamorphic Kimezian basement, and the sedimentary West Congolian Group ( Tack et al. 2011). This latter (originally described by Cahen 1978) is subdivided into four subgroups: (i) the 1,650 m-thick (B) Synthetic stratigraphic log combined with C and Sr isotopic curves of the West Congolian Group in the DRC (modified after Tait et al. 2011). ...
Chapter
The Congo Shield is a central African large landmass with several Archean nuclei welded during the Eburnean orogeny approx. 2.1-1.8 Ga and subsequently stabilized as a coherent unit throughout late Paleoproterozoic to Meso-Neoproterozoic times. The early Neoproterozoic was marked by rifting along the margins of the Congo Shield related to the break-up of Rodinia at about 1.0 Ga, and opening of the Adamastor Ocean, followed by a passive margin-type sedimentation, and finally a foreland basin deposition during the amalgamation of Gondwanaland initiated at approximately 600 Ma. We summarize the present knowledge of the lithostratigraphy of the Neoproterozoic basins exposed along margins of the Congo Basin in an attempt to establish chronostratigraphic correlations between these isolated basins in the Democratic Republic of Congo and neighboring countries.
... We suggest that the assembled landmass formed the protoCongo Craton (Fig. 11a;Fernandez-Alonso et al., 2011). Since the Late Palaeoproterozoic, this proto-craton stabilised and remained a united entity (Tack et al., 2006Tack et al., , 2008), which underwent repeated intracratonic transtensional tectonomagmatic events (Tack et al., 2010Tack et al., , 2011Delvaux et al., 2011) but not breakup, drifting or the formation of juvenile oceanic crust. Rodinia and Gondwana orogenic events are considered to have occurred along the margins of the proto-Congo craton. ...
Article
The Mesoproterozoic Kibara Belt (also Kibaran Belt or Kibarides in some references) of Central Africa was often portrayed as a continuous, c. 1500 km long orogenic belt, trending NE to NNE from Katanga, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in the south, up into SW Uganda in the north. Recently however, the Karagwe-Ankole Belt (KAB; formerly the NE Kibara Belt) has been redefined as the part north of a NW oriented Palaeoproterozoic basement high of the Ubende-Rusizi Belts, while the Kibara Belt (KIB) is now limited to the part south of this rise.
Chapter
The Congo Shield is a central African large landmass with several Archean nuclei welded during the Eburnean orogeny approx. 2.1-1.8 Ga and subsequently stabilized as a coherent unit throughout late Paleoproterozoic to Meso-Neoproterozoic times. The early Neoproterozoic was marked by rifting along the margins of the Congo Shield related to the break-up of Rodinia at about 1.0 Ga, and opening of the Adamastor Ocean, followed by a passive margin-type sedimentation, and finally a foreland basin deposition during the amalgamation of Gondwanaland initiated at approximately 600 Ma. We summarize the present knowledge of the lithostratigraphy of the Neoproterozoic basins exposed along margins of the Congo Basin in an attempt to establish chronostratigraphic correlations between these isolated basins in the Democratic Republic of Congo and neighboring countries.
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