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Depth-Oriented Values Extraction

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Abstract

The author examines the role of values in the career decision-making process and describes Depth-Oriented Values Extraction (DOVE) as a process that translates various types of psychological data (e.g., Holland-type themes) into values-based terms and language that facilitate career decision making. The author presents a case study to demonstrate the implications of DOVE for career counseling and makes suggestions for counselors.

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... The results were obtained from the groups who were identified with poor value connections illustrated that employees were significantly less productive than the former group. In a similar study, Colozzi (2003) used the case study approach to show the impact of values and congruence on decisions and production. One single business administration student within the career counseling profession was examined in order to ascertain the various impacts of values congruence over time (Colozzi, 2003). ...
... In a similar study, Colozzi (2003) used the case study approach to show the impact of values and congruence on decisions and production. One single business administration student within the career counseling profession was examined in order to ascertain the various impacts of values congruence over time (Colozzi, 2003). Colozzi (2003) found that the level of output and behaviour of an individual is greatly affected by their values and whether or not perceived organizational value congruence exists. ...
... One single business administration student within the career counseling profession was examined in order to ascertain the various impacts of values congruence over time (Colozzi, 2003). Colozzi (2003) found that the level of output and behaviour of an individual is greatly affected by their values and whether or not perceived organizational value congruence exists. The behaviours that resulted from high levels of value congruence were; effective decisions, ethical practices, organizational citizenship behaviour, and increased production (Colozzi, 2003). ...
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Thesis (M.A.)--Brock University, 2006. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 127-139). Microfiche.
... Depth oriented values extraction (DOVE; Colozzi, 2003) represents yet another counterpoint to the rational paradigm. Colozzi posits two distinct values systems that mutually influence cognitive and affective appraisals of options in the career decision-making process. ...
... Despite their diminished emphasis on rational methods, the anti-introspectivist view of career decision making (Krieshok, 1998), positive uncertainty (Gelatt, 1989), planned happenstance (Mitchell et al., 1999), depth oriented values extraction (Colozzi, 2003), nonlinear orientations (Bloch, 2005), and even the popular applied work of Bolles (2008), can be construed as approaches to the development of adaptive rationality (March, 1978). Adaptive rationality emphasizes experiential learning in the interest of engendering a state of affairs in which decision making is optimal as a result of the accumulation of experience and information. ...
Article
The terms of work have changed, with multiple transitions now characterizing the arc of a typical career. This article examines an ongoing shift in the area of vocational decision making, as it moves from a place where “it’s all about the match” to one closer to “it’s all about adapting to change”. We review literatures on judgment and decision making, 2-system models of decisional thought, the neuroanatomy of decision making, and the role of non-conscious processes in decision making. Acknowledging the limits of rationality, and the abundance of non-conscious processes in decision making, obliges us to act in ways that mitigate the inherent difficulties to which those processes make us vulnerable. We conclude that both rational and intuitive processes seem dialectically intertwined in effective decision making, and we offer a trilateral model of career decision making that includes rational and intuitive mechanisms, both of which are funded and kept in check by occupational engagement.
... Hablando de valores personales, hay autores (Colozzi, 2003) que distinguen entre valores expresados y valores implícitos, siendo los primeros aquellos que se dicen tener y los segundos los que de verdad se tienen. ...
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En este artículo se plantea el potencial conflicto existente entre, de un lado, una dinámica organizativa y social que empuja al individuo hacia comportamientos despersonalizados, homogéneos y estandarizados y, de otro, la tendencia de ese individuo a ser él mismo, según sus propias convicciones y valores personales. Como hilo conductor, se exponen los experimentos de Stanley Milgram sobre la obediencia. El liderazgo personal, entendido como la capacidad de cada individuo para regir su destino en coherencia con sus propios valores personales, resulta clave en la resolución de este potencial conflicto.
... The overarching question for career thinking, identified above is 'How can I be who I want to be?', and in order to answer this, people need to develop a clear sense of their current and their desired identities. The first aspect 'What matters to me?' concerns meaning, and explores values (Brown, 1996; Colozzi, 2003) and purpose (Dik & Duffy, 2009; Seligman, 1998). The second question addresses the different aspects of life and encourages individuals to conceptualise their lives and futures holistically (Mainiero & Sullivan, 2005; Savickas, 2012). ...
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Over the last decades the academic community has produced an impressive array of innovative theories and ground breaking evidence within the sphere of career development. The publications have extended the limits of our understanding and give invaluable guidance for effective, evidence-based career practice. But the bridge between research and practice is not always as well trodden as we might hope: for many practitioners, the task of synthesising these disparate theoretical and empirical literatures may be insurmountable. This paper presents a new model, a meta-model, which incorporates the concepts lying at the heart of the key ideas which have emerged in recent years. Drawing from over 50 theories and approaches, this model offers an overarching framework which sets out how the concepts within the different theories interact, overlap and complement each other. The model is intended as a tool which practitioners and students can use to help them to make sense of the theoretical landscape, and as a framework which could allow them to bring together the many theories to underpin their practice.
... Efforts to link career interests and work values with aspects of personality underscore the notion that they share some common structural components. In fact, Spokane andDecker (1999, as cited in Larson, Rottinghaus &Borgen, 2002) suggest that "interests, personality, self-efficacy, and other variants of personality and vocational self-concept may be facets of a Based on the relationships between interests and values as suggested by theory (e.g., Colozzi, 2003;Holland, 1997;Smith & Campbell, 2009) and on personal experience, practicing counselors typically link individuals' interests and values in helping to explore "matching" occupations. For example, if one is working with an individual who scores high on the "Social" interest scale on the O*NET assessment, the assumption is that the person would find satisfaction in work that affords the opportunity to foster the welfare of others (i.e., the "Relationships" value scale in terms of the O*NET Work Importance Locator). ...
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Person by environment fit is the most common approach used to support career decision making. In short, individuals learn how their personal characteristics can be “matched” to the occupations that correspond to those characteristics. Various career assessments have been designed to facilitate this matching process, including the O*NET Interest Profiler (designed to assess an individual’s career interests) and the O*NET Work Importance Locator (designed to assess an individual’s work values), both published by the U. S. Department of Labor. The assumed relationships between career interests and work values have not been thoroughly researched, especially as measured by these O*NET instruments. The present study sought to examine the relationships. In particular, it was hypothesized that each career interest would significantly correlate with one or possibly two theoretically related work values: Realistic with Working Condition; Investigative with Achievement; Artistic with Independence; Social Interest with Relationships; Enterprising with Status; and Conventional with Support and/or Recognition. O*NET-based career assessments from a sample of over 52,000 individuals (assumed to be primarily high school students, given the nature of those usually assessed with such systems) were examined. O*NET career interest scales were correlated with O*NET work value scales to determine the relationships between these two related sets of constructs. While a number of correlations were significant at p < .01, no correlation was larger in magnitude than 0.05. Effect sizes (r2) were calculated, and no effect size exceeded 0.2% of variance explained. The overall conclusion reached was that career interests and work values, as assessed by the O*NET instruments, were substantially unrelated. Three broad potential explanations for the lack of correlation were suggested: (1) limitations of the assessment instruments; (2) applicability of interest and value constructs to high school students; and (3) career interests and work values are totally nonoverlapping constructs. Evidence consistent with the first explanation was presented. The second and third explanation should be explored in further studies.
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Holland's (1985a) typology of persons and environments is outlined, and support for the theory as an explanation of stability and change in careers and work satisfaction is summarized. Studies show that people flourish in their work environment when there is a good fit between their personality type and the characteristics of the environment. Lack of congruence between personality and environment leads to dissatisfaction, unstable career paths, and lowered performance. The results of recent research designed to strengthen the explanatory power of Hollands's typology and link it to the Big Five personality factors is described. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Personality was studied as a conditioner of the effects of stressful life events on illness onset. Two groups of middle and upper level executives had comparably high degrees of stressful life events in the previous 3 years, as measured by the Holmes and Rahe Schedule of Recent Life Events. One group (n = 86) suffered high stress without falling ill, whereas the other (n = 75) reported becoming sick after their encounter with stressful life events. Illness was measured by the Wyler, Masuda, and Holmes Seriousness of Illness Survey. Discriminant function analysis, run on half of the subjects in each group and cross-validated on the remaining cases, supported the prediction that high stress/low illness executives show, by comparison with high stress/high illness executives, more hardiness, that is, have a stronger commitment to self, an attitude of vigorousness toward the environment, a sense of meaningfulness, and an internal locus of control.
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A description is given of the change in the value orientation of the individual from infancy to average adulthood, and from this adult status to a greater degree of psychological maturity attained through psychotherapy or fortunate life circumstances. On the basis of these observations, the theory is advanced that there is an organismic basis for the valuing process within the human individual; that this valuing process is effective to the degree that the individual is open to his experiencing; that in persons relatively open to their experiencing there is an important commonality or universality of value directions; that these directions make for the constructive enhancement of the individual and his community, and for the survival and evolution of his species.
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