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The 'Hedonic' in Human-Computer Interaction – History, Contributions, and Future Research Directions

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Over the recent years, the notion of a non-instrumental, hedonic quality of interactive products received growing interest. Based on a review of 151 publications, we summarize more than ten years research on the hedonic to provide an overview of definitions, assessment tools, antecedents, consequences, and correlates. We highlight a number of contributions, such as introducing experiential value to the practice of technology design and a better prediction of overall quality judgments and product acceptance. In addition, we suggest a number of areas for future research, such as providing richer, more nuanced models and tools for quantitative and qualitative analysis, more research on the consequences of using hedonic products and a better understanding of when the hedonic plays a role and when not.
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