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Serving the underserved: Creating a low cost sunscreen with natural ingredients for humanitarian medical trips to the developing world

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Abstract

Photodermatoses and disorders of pigmentation are commonly encountered in underserved populations during humanitarian medical trips. High cost of sunscreens and occupational UV light exposure are barriers for patients who need photoprotection. In 2009-2010, teams of dermatologists travelled to Yucatan, Mexico to provide dermatologic care.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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... The lack of financial means, occupational exposure from outdoor work, and the entry of sunlight into homes with low density materials may all contribute to high levels of skin cancer morbidity. 31 The amount of UVR exposure may be largely out of an individual's control if they are employed in an outdoor profession. Sunprotective clothing and advisement to seek shade is necessary but not always possible. ...
... An 85-gram mixture of 75% almond oil, 16% zinc oxide, and 9% beeswax provides a sun protection factor rating of approximately 15, and costs 11 times less than a similar-strength commercial alternative. 31 There are limitations to consider in the context of the global burden of skin cancer. Studies measuring KC are limited because of their exclusion from large cancer registries, which makes data comparison difficult. ...
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Background Despite efforts toward the earlier detection and prevention of skin cancer, the prevalence of skin cancers continues to increase. Identifying trends in skin cancer burdens among populations can lead to impactful and sustainable interventions. Methods We assessed the global trends in skin cancer from 1990 to 2017 in 195 countries worldwide through the Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) 2017 database. Results The rate of change in skin cancers between 1990 to 2017 varied among countries. Squamous cell carcinomas increased by 310% during this time, the highest among any neoplasm tracked by the GBD. Men experienced greater age-specific prevalence rates of keratinocyte carcinoma across all ages (P < .05). Women had a greater prevalence of melanoma until approximately age 50 years, after which the trend reversed until age 85 years. Men experienced greater age-specific death rates across all ages. The disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of melanoma and keratinocyte carcinoma increased exponentially with age (P < .05). Conclusion The incidence, prevalence, and DALYs of skin cancers are increasing disproportionately among different demographic groups. As a worldwide epidemiological assessment, the GBD 2017 provides frequently updated measures of the skin cancer burden, which may help to direct resources and allocate funding to close the gap in global skin cancer disparities.
... Due to its safer and lubrication properties as well as rapid absorption by the skin, almond oil was used in aromatherapy studies (in palliative care patients, patients with osteoarthritis, menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea, sleep quality, stress, anxiety, depression, and pain) as a carrier oil or placebo/control (Ahmad et al., 2019;Arroyo-Morales et al., 2008;Attias et al., 2018;Ayik & Özden, 2018;Cheraghbeigi et al., 2019;Han et al., 2006;Huang & Capdevila, 2017;Kyle, 2006;Lamadah & Nomani, 2016;Lewith et al., 2005;Nasiri et al., 2016;Sadeghi Aval Shahr et al., 2015;Sayorwan et al., 2012;Seol et al., 2013;Seyyed-Rasooli et al., 2016;Xiong et al., 2018). Moreover, the efficacy of a homemade low-cost sunscreen combining almond oil (75%), beeswax (9%), and zinc oxide (16%) tested on five volunteers in the United States was shown to be comparable to commercial sunscreens (Miyar et al., 2014). ...
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