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Abstract

Importance: Post-encephalitic parkinsonism (PEP) is believed to be caused by a viral illness which causes degeneration of the nerve cells in the substantia nigra, resulting in clinical parkinsonism. Although common during the period of the First World War, the diagnosis of PEP is rarely entertained today. Observation: We report an adolescent boy of PEP, who was bedridden due to severe parkinsonism following the encephalitis attack. After relevant imaging and investigation, he was treated with levodopa which made him independent from a year long total dependent condition. Relevance and conclusion: Encephalitis lethargica or PEP is one of the rare parkinsonian syndromes which may be amenable to treatment. Proper diagnosis and treatment may help the patient become ambulatory from the dreaded lethargic condition.

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