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Abstract

Our research explores the search behaviour of EFL learners (n=24) by tracking their interaction with corpus-based materials during focus-on-form activities ( Observe , Search the corpus , Rewriting ). One set of learners made no use of web services other than the BNC during the central Search the corpus activity while the other set resorted to other web services and/or consultation guidelines. The performance of the second group was higher, the learners’ formulation of corpus queries on the BNC was unsophisticated and the students tended to use the BNC search interface to a great extent in the same way as they used Google or similar services. Our findings suggest that careful consideration should be given to the cognitive aspects concerning the initiation of corpus searches, the role of computer search interfaces, as well as the implementation of corpus-based language learning. Our study offers a taxonomy of learner searches that may be of interest in future research.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
Pérez-Paredes, P., Sánchez-Tornel, M. & Alcaraz Calero, J.M. (2012) Learners search patterns during corpus-based focus-on-form activities. A study on hands-on concordancing.
International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17:4, pp. 482-515.
... Autonomous approaches encourage learners to consult corpus resources to solve their own individual production problems as the need arises. Without a teacher there to advise them, however, they may not know exactly what to look for in the corpus, and they may have difficulty working with complex corpus interfaces such as those provided by BNCweb and Sketch Engine (see, for example, Pérez-Paredes, Sánchez-Tornel & Alcaraz Calero, 2013). In contrast, a more guided approach to DDL is less likely to be tailored to individual needs, and may be more limited in terms of both quantity and quality because most learners do not have permanent one-to-one access to a corpus-literate language tutor. ...
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